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Early Childhood Obesity Risk Factors: Socioeconomic Adversity, Family Dysfunction, Offspring Distress, and Junk Food Self-Medication.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences. Karolinska insitutet.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7335-3796
2018 (English)In: Current Obesity Reports, E-ISSN 2162-4968, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 204-209Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To explore the sequence and interaction of infancy and early childhood risk factors, particularly relating to disturbances in the social environment, and how the consequences of such exposures can promote weight gain and obesity.

RECENT FINDINGS: This review will argue that socioeconomic adversity is a key upstream catalyst that sets the stage for critical midstream risk factors such as family strain and dysfunction, offspring insecurity, stress, emotional turmoil, low self-esteem, and poor mental health. These midstream risk factors, particularly stress and emotional turmoil, create a more or less perfect foil for calorie-dense junk food self-medication and subtle addiction, to alleviate uncomfortable psychological and emotional states. Disturbances in the social environment during infancy and early childhood appear to play a critical role in weight gain and obesity, through such mechanisms as insecurity, stress, and emotional turmoil, eventually leading to junk food self-medication and subtle addiction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 7, no 2, p. 204-209
Keywords [en]
Affective states, Emotion regulation, Family environment, Food addiction, Infancy, Obesity etiology
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5264DOI: 10.1007/s13679-018-0310-2ISI: 000432628100013PubMedID: 29704182OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-5264DiVA, id: diva2:1210052
Available from: 2018-05-25 Created: 2018-05-25 Last updated: 2018-06-07

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Hemmingsson, Erik

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