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Calcaneal adduction and eversion are coupled to talus and tibial rotation.
German Sport University, Cologne.
German Sport University, Cologne.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1210-6449
German Sport University, Cologne.
2018 (English)In: Journal of Anatomy, ISSN 0021-8782, E-ISSN 1469-7580Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to quantify isolated coupling mechanisms of calcaneal adduction/abduction and calcaneal eversion/inversion to proximal bones in vitro. The in vitro approach is necessary because in vivo both movements appear together, making it impossible to determine the extent of their individual contribution to overall ankle joint coupling. Eight fresh frozen foot-leg specimens were tested. Data describing bone orientation and coupling mechanisms between segments were obtained using bone pin marker triads. The bone movement was described in a global coordinate system to examine the coupling between the calcaneus, talus and tibia. The strength of coupling was determined by means of the slope of a linear least squares fit to an angle-angle plot. The coupling coefficients in the present study indicate that not only calcaneal eversion/inversion (coupling coefficient: 0.68 ± 0.15) but to an even greater extent calcaneal adduction/abduction (coupling coefficient: 0.99 ± 0.10) was transferred into talus and tibial rotation, highlighting the relevance of calcaneal adduction for the overall ankle joint coupling. The results of this study present the possibility that controlling calcaneal adduction/abduction can affect talus and tibial rotation and therefore the possible genesis of overuse knee injuries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018.
Keyword [en]
ankle joint, locomotion, movement coupling, overuse injury
National Category
Neurosciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5232DOI: 10.1111/joa.12813PubMedID: 29582433OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-5232DiVA, id: diva2:1193997
Available from: 2018-03-28 Created: 2018-03-28 Last updated: 2018-04-04Bibliographically approved

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The full text will be freely available from 2019-03-26 10:00
Available from 2019-03-26 10:00

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Arndt, Anton

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