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Increased physical activity in abdominally obese women through support for changed commuting habits: a randomized clinical trial.
Karolinska institutet.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7335-3796​
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2009 (English)In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 33, no 6, 645-52 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Abdominally obese women can reduce their health risk through regular physical activity. There is, however, little evidence on the effectiveness of interventions that promote physical activity long-term, such as cycling and walking to and from work.

METHODS: This intervention focused on physically active commuting (cycling and walking) in middle-aged (30-60 years), abdominally obese (waist circumference > or = 88 cm) women (n=120), recruited by newspaper advertisement. The intervention group was a moderate-intensity programme with physician meetings, physical activity prescriptions, group counselling and bicycles. The control group was a low-intensity group support programme with pedometers. We used a randomized, controlled, 2-armed design with 18 months duration and intention-to-treat analysis (data collection 2005-2006). Treatment success was defined as bicycling > or = 2 km/d (primary) or walking 10,000 steps per day (secondary).

RESULTS: At baseline, mean (s.d.) age was 48.2 years (7.4), waist circumference 103.8 cm (7.8), walking 8471 steps per day (2646), bicycling 0 km per day. Attrition at 18 months was 10% for the intervention group and 25% in the control group (P=0.03). The intervention group was more likely to achieve treatment success for cycling than controls: 38.7 vs 8.9% (odds ratio (OR)=7.8 (95% confidence interval=4.0 to 15.0, P<0.001)), but with no difference for compliance with the walking recommendation: 45.7 vs 39.3% (OR=1.2 (95% CI=0.7 to 2.0, P=0.50)). Commuting by car and public transport were reduced by 34% (P<0.01) and 37% (P<0.001), respectively, with no differences between groups. Both groups attained similar waist reductions (-2.1 and -2.6 cm, P=0.72).

CONCLUSIONS: Abdominally obese women can increase PA long-term through moderate-intensity behavioural support aimed at changing commuting habits.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 33, no 6, 645-52 p.
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4750DOI: 10.1038/ijo.2009.77PubMedID: 19417772OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-4750DiVA: diva2:1068866
Available from: 2017-01-26 Created: 2017-01-26 Last updated: 2017-01-31Bibliographically approved

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