Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH

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Acute effects of physical activity patterns on plasma cortisol and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in relation to corticospinal excitability.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physical Activity and Health. Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.. (Fysisk aktivitet och hjärnhälsa)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7879-9188
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physical Activity and Health. (Fysisk aktivitet och hjärnhälsa)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3805-2861
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physical Activity and Health. Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.. (Fysisk aktivitet och hjärnhälsa)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0079-124x
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7456-8606
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2022 (English)In: Behavioural Brain Research, ISSN 0166-4328, E-ISSN 1872-7549, Vol. 430, article id 113926Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cortisol are both capable of modulating synaptic plasticity, but it is unknown how physical activity-induced changes in their plasma levels relate to corticospinal plasticity in humans. Sixteen inactive middle-aged men and women participated in three separate interventions consisting of 3hours prolonged sitting (SIT); 3hours sitting interrupted every 30minutes with frequent short physical activity breaks (FPA); and 2.5hours prolonged sitting followed by 25minutes of moderate intensity exercise (EXE). These 3hour sessions were each followed by a 30min period of paired associative stimulation over the primary motor cortex (PAS). Blood samples were taken and corticospinal excitability measured at baseline, pre PAS, 5min and 30min post PAS. Here we report levels of plasma BDNF and cortisol over three activity conditions and relate these levels to previously published changes in corticospinal excitability of a non-activated thumb muscle. There was no interaction between time and condition in BDNF, but cortisol levels were significantly higher after EXE compared to after SIT and FPA. Higher cortisol levels at pre PAS predicted larger increases in corticospinal excitability from baseline to all subsequent time points in the FPA condition only, while levels of BDNF at pre PAS did not predict such changes in any of the conditions. Neither BDNF nor cortisol modified changes from pre PAS to the subsequent time points, suggesting that the increased corticospinal excitability was not mediated though an augmented effect of the PAS protocol. The relationship between cortisol and plasticity has been suggested to be U-shaped. This is possibly why the moderately high levels of cortisol seen in the FPA condition were positively associated with changes AURC, while the higher cortisol levels seen after EXE were not. A better understanding of the mechanisms for how feasible physical activity breaks affect neuroplasticity can inform the theoretical framework for how work environments and schedules should be designed. DATA AVAILABILITY: Data are available from the corresponding author upon reasonable request.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022. Vol. 430, article id 113926
Keywords [en]
BDNF, attention, cortisol, motor cortex, paired associative stimulation, plasticity
National Category
Psychiatry Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7061DOI: 10.1016/j.bbr.2022.113926ISI: 000816115000002PubMedID: 35568076OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-7061DiVA, id: diva2:1659356
Part of project
E-PABS - a centre of Excellence in Physical Activity, healthy Brain functions and Sustainability, Knowledge FoundationPhysical activity and healthy brain functions in office workers, Knowledge Foundation
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20160040, 20180151, 20210002
Note

Övriga finansiärer: ICA Gruppen, Intrum, SATS, Monark Exercise, Intrum Justitia

Available from: 2022-05-19 Created: 2022-05-19 Last updated: 2024-03-21

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Ekblom, MariaBojsen-Møller, EmilBlom, VictoriaTarassova, OlgaMoberg, MarcusPontén, MarjanWang, RuiEkblom, Örjan

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