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Insomnia and cardiorespiratory fitness in a middle-aged population: the SCAPIS pilot study.
University of Gothenburg.
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6058-4982 
University of Gothenburg.
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2019 (English)In: Sleep and Breathing, ISSN 1520-9512, E-ISSN 1522-1709, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 319-326Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The relationship between insomnia and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), a well-established risk factor for cardiovascular disease, has not been extensively studied. We aimed to assess the independent association between insomnia and CRF in a population-based cohort of subjects aged 50 to 64 years.

METHODS: Subjects participating in the Swedish CArdioPulmonary bioImaging Study (SCAPIS) pilot cohort (n = 603, men 47.9%) underwent a submaximal cycle ergometer test for estimation of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). Data on physical activity and sedentary time were collected via waist-worn accelerometers. An insomnia severity index score ≥ 10 was used to define insomnia.

RESULTS: Insomnia was identified in 31.8% of the population. The VO2max was significantly lower in insomnia subjects compared with the non-insomnia group (31.2 ± 6.3 vs. 32.4 ± 6.5 ml* kg-1 *min-1, p = 0.028). There was no difference in objectively assessed physical activity or time spent sedentary between the groups. In a multivariate generalized linear model adjusting for confounders, an independent association between insomnia status and lower VO2max was found in men, but not in women (β = - 1.15 [95% CI - 2.23-- 0.06] and - 0.09 [- 1.09-0.92], p = 0.038 and 0.866, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS: We found a modest, but significant, association between insomnia and lower CRF in middle-aged men, but not in women. Our results suggest that insomnia may link to cardiovascular disease via reduced CRF. Insomnia may require a specific focus in the context of health campaigns addressing CRF.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019. Vol. 23, no 1, p. 319-326
Keywords [en]
Cardiovascular disease, Gender, Insomnia, Maximal oxygen consumption, Physical activity, Population-based cohort
National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5504DOI: 10.1007/s11325-018-1765-9ISI: 000462650800038PubMedID: 30547350OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-5504DiVA, id: diva2:1271268
Available from: 2018-12-17 Created: 2018-12-17 Last updated: 2019-04-23Bibliographically approved

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