Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH

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Publications (10 of 28) Show all publications
Larsson, L. E., Wang, R., Cederholm, T., Wiggenraad, F., Rydén, M., Hagman, G., . . . Thunborg, C. (2023). Association of Sarcopenia and Its Defining Components with the Degree of Cognitive Impairment in a Memory Clinic Population.. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 96(2), 777-788
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of Sarcopenia and Its Defining Components with the Degree of Cognitive Impairment in a Memory Clinic Population.
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 96, no 2, p. 777-788Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Sarcopenia and cognitive impairment are two leading causes of disabilities.

OBJECTIVE: The objective was to examine the prevalence of sarcopenia and investigate the association between sarcopenia diagnostic components (muscle strength, muscle mass, and physical performance) and cognitive impairment in memory clinic patients.

METHODS: 368 patients were included (age 59.0±7.25 years, women: 58.7%), displaying three clinical phenotypes of cognitive impairments, i.e., subjective cognitive impairment (SCI, 57%), mild cognitive impairment (MCI, 26%), and Alzheimer's disease (AD, 17%). Sarcopenia was defined according to diagnostic algorithm recommended by the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People. Components of sarcopenia were grip strength, bioelectrical impedance analysis, and gait speed. They were further aggregated into a score (0-3 points) by counting the numbers of limited components. Multi-nominal logistic regression was applied.

RESULTS: Probable sarcopenia (i.e., reduced grip strength) was observed in 9.6% of the patients, and 3.5% were diagnosed with sarcopenia. Patients with faster gait speed showed less likelihood of MCI (odds ratio [OR]: 0.24, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.06-0.90) and AD (OR: 0.12, 95% CI: 0.03-0.60). One or more limited sarcopenia components was associated with worse cognitive function. After adjusting for potential confounders, the association remained significant only for AD (OR 4.29, 95% CI 1.45-11.92).

CONCLUSION: The results indicate a connection between the sarcopenia components and cognitive impairments. Limitations in the sarcopenia measures, especially slow walking speed, were related to poorer cognitive outcomes. More investigationsare required to further verify the causal relationship between sarcopenia and cognitive outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2023
Keywords
Alzheimer’s disease, body composition, cognitive function, gait speed, hand grip strength, outpatients, sarcopenia
National Category
Geriatrics Neurology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7949 (URN)10.3233/JAD-221186 (DOI)001099536400028 ()37899056 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2022-01404Knowledge Foundation, 2018-0151, 2021-0002, 2022-0202The Karolinska Institutet's Research Foundation, 2022-02248
Available from: 2023-11-20 Created: 2023-11-20 Last updated: 2024-01-26
Wu, J., Xiong, Y., Xia, X., Orsini, N., Qiu, C., Kivipelto, M., . . . Wang, R. (2023). Can dementia risk be reduced by following the American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7?: A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis.. Ageing Research Reviews, 83, Article ID 101788.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can dementia risk be reduced by following the American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7?: A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis.
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2023 (English)In: Ageing Research Reviews, ISSN 1568-1637, E-ISSN 1872-9649, Vol. 83, article id 101788Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aimed to quantify the relationships between the American Heart Association (AHA) Cardiovascular Health (CVH) metrics, namely AHA Life's Simple 7, and cognitive outcomes. We searched PubMed and Embase (January 1, 2010-August 24, 2022) and finally included 14 longitudinal studies (311654 participants with 8006 incident dementia cases). Random-effects meta-analysis and one-stage linear mixed-effects models were performed. Increased CVH score seemed to associate with decreased risk of incident dementia in a linear manner, but this relationship varied by the measurement age of CVH metrics. That is, midlife CVH tended to have a linear association with late-life dementia risk, whereas a J-shaped association was observed between the late-life CVH score and dementia. In addition, late-life dementia risk was reduced significantly if individuals maintained an ideal level of AHA's CVH guidelines of physical activity, fasting plasma glucose, total cholesterol, and smoking. However, our meta-analysis did not show a significant association between CVH score and global cognitive decline rate. Following AHA's CVH guidelines and maintaining CVH at an optimal level would substantially reduce the late-life dementia risk. More research is required to explore the link between a favorable CVH score and cognitive trajectories among cognitively asymptomatic older populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Cardiovascular health, Dementia, Global cognitive function, Life’s Simple 7, Meta-analysis
National Category
Geriatrics
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7425 (URN)10.1016/j.arr.2022.101788 (DOI)000974976400001 ()36371016 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-12-02 Created: 2022-12-02 Last updated: 2023-06-27
Wang, R., Dekhtyar, S. & Wang, H.-X. (2023). Cognitive Reserve: A Life-Course Perspective. In: Petrosini, Laura (Ed.), Neurobiological and Psychological Aspects of Brain Recovery: (pp. 121-135). Springer Publishing Company
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive Reserve: A Life-Course Perspective
2023 (English)In: Neurobiological and Psychological Aspects of Brain Recovery / [ed] Petrosini, Laura, Springer Publishing Company, 2023, p. 121-135Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The concept of reserve has been developed to account for the discontinuity between the extent of brain damage at its clinical manifestation in the form of cognitive decline or dementia. In this chapter, we discuss contributors to cognitive reserve from various stages of the life-course, including childhood, early adulthood, middle age, and late life. Evidence from observational studies as well as intervention trials is presented and assessed. We conclude by arguing that reserve formation in dementia risk is a life-course process whereby baseline cognitive abilities are subjected to modulation by subsequent experiences at diverse stages over the entire life-course. Variations among individuals in their ability to withstand age-related brain changes are ultimately dependent on their life-time accumulation of mental, physical, and lifestyle inputs into cognitive reserve.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Publishing Company, 2023
National Category
Neurosciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7675 (URN)10.1007/978-3-031-24930-3_5 (DOI)978-3-031-24930-3 (ISBN)978-3-031-24929-7 (ISBN)978-3-031-24932-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-06-27 Created: 2023-06-27 Last updated: 2023-06-27
Ekblom, M., Ekblom, Ö., Wiklund, C. & Wang, R. (2023). Environmental and genetic contributions to device-based measures of physical activity in Swedish 9-year-olds.. In: : . Paper presented at ISBNPA, International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity annual meeting, June 14-17, 2023, Uppsala, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental and genetic contributions to device-based measures of physical activity in Swedish 9-year-olds.
2023 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

 

National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-8062 (URN)
Conference
ISBNPA, International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity annual meeting, June 14-17, 2023, Uppsala, Sweden
Funder
Knowledge FoundationSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2024-01-17 Created: 2024-01-17 Last updated: 2024-01-18Bibliographically approved
Chen, S., Persson, M., Wang, R., Dalman, C., Lee, B. K., Karlsson, H. & Gardner, R. M. (2023). Random capillary glucose levels throughout pregnancy, obstetric and neonatal outcomes, and long-term neurodevelopmental conditions in children: a group-based trajectory analysis.. BMC Medicine, 21(1), Article ID 260.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Random capillary glucose levels throughout pregnancy, obstetric and neonatal outcomes, and long-term neurodevelopmental conditions in children: a group-based trajectory analysis.
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2023 (English)In: BMC Medicine, E-ISSN 1741-7015, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 260Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with both short- and long-term risks, although it is unknown if risks vary by severity, timing, and duration of gestational hyperglycemia. We aimed to identify trajectories of random capillary glucose (RCG) levels throughout pregnancy and assess their associations with both obstetric/neonatal outcomes and children's risk of neurodevelopmental conditions (NDCs) (i.e., autism, intellectual disability, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorders [ADHD]).

METHODS: A population-based cohort study was conducted involving 76,228 children born to 68,768 mothers without pregestational diabetes. Group-based trajectory modeling was utilized to identify distinct glucose trajectories across RCG values throughout the course of pregnancy. The associations between these trajectory groups and obstetric/neonatal outcomes as well as children's NDCs were then assessed using generalized estimating equation models with a logit link. The Benjamini-Hochberg (BH) procedure was employed to adjust P-values for multiple comparisons, controlling the false discovery rate (FDR).

RESULTS: Five distinct glucose trajectory groups were identified, each with varying percentages diagnosed with GDM. Their associations with obstetric/neonatal outcomes as well as children's NDCs varied. For example, when compared to the "Persistently Low" group, other groups exhibited varying degrees of increased risk for large-for-gestational-age babies, with the exception of the "High in Early Pregnancy" group. Compared to the "Persistently Low" group, all other trajectory groups were associated with NDC outcomes, except the "High in Mid-Pregnancy" group. However, none of the associations with offspring NDCs remained significant after accounting for the FDR correction.

CONCLUSIONS: Persistent high glucose levels or moderately elevated glucose levels throughout pregnancy, as well as transient states of hyperglycemia in early or mid-pregnancy, were found to be associated with increased risks of specific obstetric and neonatal complications, and potentially offspring NDCs. These risks varied depending on the severity, timing, duration, and management of hyperglycemia. The findings underscore the need for continuous surveillance and individualized management strategies for women displaying different glucose trajectories during pregnancy. Limitations such as potential residual confounding, the role of mediators, and small sample size should be addressed in future studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Autism, Intellectual disability, Maternal glucose levels, Neonatal outcomes, Obstetric outcomes
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Endocrinology and Diabetes
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7733 (URN)10.1186/s12916-023-02926-3 (DOI)001032094700006 ()37468907 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-08-29 Created: 2023-08-29 Last updated: 2023-09-12
Ekblom, M., Bojsen-Møller, E., Blom, V., Tarassova, O., Moberg, M., Pontén, M., . . . Ekblom, Ö. (2022). Acute effects of physical activity patterns on plasma cortisol and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in relation to corticospinal excitability.. Behavioural Brain Research, 430, Article ID 113926.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute effects of physical activity patterns on plasma cortisol and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in relation to corticospinal excitability.
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2022 (English)In: Behavioural Brain Research, ISSN 0166-4328, E-ISSN 1872-7549, Vol. 430, article id 113926Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cortisol are both capable of modulating synaptic plasticity, but it is unknown how physical activity-induced changes in their plasma levels relate to corticospinal plasticity in humans. Sixteen inactive middle-aged men and women participated in three separate interventions consisting of 3hours prolonged sitting (SIT); 3hours sitting interrupted every 30minutes with frequent short physical activity breaks (FPA); and 2.5hours prolonged sitting followed by 25minutes of moderate intensity exercise (EXE). These 3hour sessions were each followed by a 30min period of paired associative stimulation over the primary motor cortex (PAS). Blood samples were taken and corticospinal excitability measured at baseline, pre PAS, 5min and 30min post PAS. Here we report levels of plasma BDNF and cortisol over three activity conditions and relate these levels to previously published changes in corticospinal excitability of a non-activated thumb muscle. There was no interaction between time and condition in BDNF, but cortisol levels were significantly higher after EXE compared to after SIT and FPA. Higher cortisol levels at pre PAS predicted larger increases in corticospinal excitability from baseline to all subsequent time points in the FPA condition only, while levels of BDNF at pre PAS did not predict such changes in any of the conditions. Neither BDNF nor cortisol modified changes from pre PAS to the subsequent time points, suggesting that the increased corticospinal excitability was not mediated though an augmented effect of the PAS protocol. The relationship between cortisol and plasticity has been suggested to be U-shaped. This is possibly why the moderately high levels of cortisol seen in the FPA condition were positively associated with changes AURC, while the higher cortisol levels seen after EXE were not. A better understanding of the mechanisms for how feasible physical activity breaks affect neuroplasticity can inform the theoretical framework for how work environments and schedules should be designed. DATA AVAILABILITY: Data are available from the corresponding author upon reasonable request.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
BDNF, attention, cortisol, motor cortex, paired associative stimulation, plasticity
National Category
Psychiatry Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7061 (URN)10.1016/j.bbr.2022.113926 (DOI)000816115000002 ()35568076 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20160040, 20180151, 20210002
Note

Övriga finansiärer: ICA Gruppen, Intrum, SATS, Monark Exercise, Intrum Justitia

Available from: 2022-05-19 Created: 2022-05-19 Last updated: 2024-02-27
Motovylyak, A., Vogt, N. M., Adluru, N., Ma, Y., Wang, R., Oh, J. M., . . . Okonkwo, O. C. (2022). Age-related differences in white matter microstructure measured by advanced diffusion MRI in healthy older adults at risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Aging Brain, 2, Article ID 100030.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age-related differences in white matter microstructure measured by advanced diffusion MRI in healthy older adults at risk for Alzheimer’s disease
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2022 (English)In: Aging Brain, ISSN 2589-9589, Vol. 2, article id 100030Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI) is an advanced diffusion imaging technique, which can detect more distinct microstructural features compared to conventional Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). NODDI allows the signal to be divided into multiple water compartments and derive measures for orientation dispersion index (ODI), neurite density index (NDI) and volume fraction of isotropic diffusion compartment (FISO). This study aimed to investigate which diffusion metric—fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), NDI, ODI, or FISO—is most influenced by aging and reflects cognitive function in a population of healthy older adults at risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Age was significantly associated with all but one diffusion parameters and regions of interest. NDI and MD in the cingulate region adjacent to the cingulate cortex showed a significant association with a composite measure of Executive Function and was proven to partially mediate the relationship between aging and Executive Function decline. These results suggest that both DTI and NODDI parameters are sensitive to age-related differences in white matter regions vulnerable to aging, particularly among older adults at risk for AD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Aging, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI), White matter
National Category
Neurosciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6980 (URN)10.1016/j.nbas.2022.100030 (DOI)
Available from: 2022-02-22 Created: 2022-02-22 Last updated: 2023-01-16
Vesperman, C. J., Wang, R., Schultz, S. A., Law, L. L., Dougherty, R. J., Ma, Y., . . . Okonkwo, O. C. (2022). Cardiorespiratory fitness and cognition in persons at risk for Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring, 14(1), Article ID e12330.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiorespiratory fitness and cognition in persons at risk for Alzheimer's disease
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2022 (English)In: Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring, ISSN 2352-8729, Vol. 14, no 1, article id e12330Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: This study examined the relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and longitudinal cognitive functioning in a cohort enriched with risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Methods: A total of 155 enrollees in the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention completed repeat comprehensive neuropsychological evaluations that assessed six cognitive domains. Peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) was the primary measure of CRF. Random effects regression was used to investigate the effect of CRF on cognitive trajectories.

Results: Higher CRF was associated with slower decline in the cognitive domains of verbal learning and memory (P < .01) and visual learning and memory (P < .042). Secondary analyses indicated that these effects were stronger among men than women, and for noncarriers of the apolipoprotein E ε4 allele.

Discussion: Higher CRF was associated with a slower rate of the decline in episodic memory that occurs as a natural consequence of aging in a cohort enriched with risk factors for AD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Alzheimer's Association, 2022
Keywords
aging, cogntion; episodic memory; exercise test; humans; neuropsychological tests
National Category
Neurology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7127 (URN)10.1002/dad2.12330 (DOI)000822296300001 ()35845261 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-09-13 Created: 2022-09-13 Last updated: 2023-01-16
Freak-Poli, R., Wagemaker, N., Wang, R., Lysen, T. S., Ikram, M. A., Vernooij, M. W., . . . Tiemeier, H. (2022). Loneliness, Not Social Support, Is Associated with Cognitive Decline and Dementia Across Two Longitudinal Population-Based Cohorts. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 85(1), 295-308
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Loneliness, Not Social Support, Is Associated with Cognitive Decline and Dementia Across Two Longitudinal Population-Based Cohorts
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 85, no 1, p. 295-308Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Poor social health is likely associated with cognitive decline and risk of dementia; however, studies show inconsistent results. Additionally, few studies separate social health components or control for mental health.

Objective: To investigate whether loneliness and social support are independently associated with cognitive decline and risk of dementia, and whether depressive symptoms confound the association.

Methods: We included 4,514 participants from the population-based Rotterdam Study (RS; aged 71±7SD years) followed up to 14 years (median 10.8, interquartile range 7.4-11.6), and 2,112 participants from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen (SNAC-K; aged 72±10SD years) followed up to 10 years (mean 5.9±1.6SD). At baseline, participants were free of major depression and scored on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) ≥26 for RS and ≥25 for SNAC-K. We investigated loneliness, perceived social support, and structural social support (specifically marital status and number of children). In both cohorts, dementia was diagnosed and cognitive function was repeatedly assessed with MMSE and a global cognitive factor (g-factor).

Results: Loneliness was prospectively associated with a decline in the MMSE in both cohorts. Consistently, persons who were lonely had an increased risk of developing dementia (RS: HR 1.34, 95%CI 1.08-1.67; SNAC-K: HR 2.16, 95%CI 1.12-4.17). Adjustment for depressive symptoms and exclusion of the first 5 years of follow-up did not alter results. Neither perceived or structural social support was associated with cognitive decline or dementia risk.

Conclusion: Loneliness, not social support, predicted cognitive decline and incident dementia independently of depressive symptoms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2022
Keywords
Psychiatry and Mental health, Geriatrics and Gerontology, Clinical Psychology, General Medicine, General Neuroscience
National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6866 (URN)10.3233/jad-210330 (DOI)000740947000025 ()34842183 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-12-02 Created: 2021-12-02 Last updated: 2023-01-16Bibliographically approved
Liang, Y., Gao, Y., Wang, R., Grande, G., Monastero, R., Dong, Y., . . . Qiu, C. (2022). Migraine, Cognitive Decline, and Dementia in Older Adults: A Population-Based Study.. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 88(1), 263-271
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Migraine, Cognitive Decline, and Dementia in Older Adults: A Population-Based Study.
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 263-271Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The potential impact of migraine on cognitive aging among older adults remains controversial.

OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship of migraine and subtypes with cognitive decline and dementia in an older Swedish population.

METHODS: This population-based study included 3069 participants (age≥60) from the Swedish National study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen, Stockholm. Baseline examination was conducted in 2001-2004, and participants were followed every 3 or 6 years until 2013-2016. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews, clinical examinations, laboratory tests, and linkage with registers. Global cognitive function was measured with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Dementia was diagnosed according to the DSM-IV criteria. Migraine and subtypes were defined following the international classification system. Data were analyzed using logistic regression, Cox regression, and linear mixed-effects models.

RESULTS: At baseline, 305 participants were defined with non-migraine headache and 352 with migraine. The cross-sectional analysis showed that the multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of prevalent dementia was 0.49 (0.20-1.21) for migraine and 0.66 (0.26-1.66) for migraine without aura. The longitudinal analysis showed that the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios of incident dementia associated with migraine and subtypes ranged 0.68-0.89 (p > 0.05). Furthermore, migraine and subtypes were not significantly associated with either baseline MMSE score or MMSE changes during follow-ups (p > 0.05). The nonsignificant associations did not vary substantially by age, APOEɛ4 allele, cerebrovascular disease, and antimigraine treatment (p for interactions > 0.05).

CONCLUSION: This study shows no evidence supporting the associations of migraine and its subtypes with cognitive decline and dementia among older adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2022
Keywords
Cognitive aging, dementia, headache, migraine, population-based study
National Category
Geriatrics
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7064 (URN)10.3233/JAD-220013 (DOI)000828029000021 ()35570487 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-05-19 Created: 2022-05-19 Last updated: 2023-01-16
Projects
E-PABS - a centre of Excellence in Physical Activity, healthy Brain functions and Sustainability [20210002 01 H]; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH; Publications
Hoy, S., Larsson, H., Kjellenberg, K., Nyberg, G., Ekblom, Ö. & Helgadóttir, B. (2024). Gendered relations? Associations between Swedish parents, siblings, and adolescents' time spent sedentary and physically active. Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, 6, Article ID 1236848. Heiland, E. G., Kjellenberg, K., Tarassova, O., Nyberg, G., Ekblom, M., Ekblom, Ö. & Helgadóttir, B. (2023). Acute effects of nitrate and breakfast on working memory and cerebral blood flow in adolescents: a randomized crossover trial. In: : . Paper presented at The International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA), Uppsala, Sweden, June 15-18, 2023. Regan, C., Heiland, E. G., Ekblom, Ö., Tarassova, O., Kjellenberg, K., Larsen, F. J., . . . Helgadóttir, B. (2023). Acute effects of nitrate and breakfast on working memory, cerebral blood flow, arterial stiffness, and psychological factors in adolescents: Study protocol for a randomised crossover trial.. PLOS ONE, 18(5), Article ID e0285581. Farias, L., Nyberg, G., Helgadóttir, B. & Andermo, S. (2023). Adolescents' experiences of a school-based health promotion intervention in socioeconomically advantaged and disadvantaged areas in Sweden: a qualitative process evaluation study.. BMC Public Health, 23(1), Article ID 1631. Larsson, L. E., Wang, R., Cederholm, T., Wiggenraad, F., Rydén, M., Hagman, G., . . . Thunborg, C. (2023). Association of Sarcopenia and Its Defining Components with the Degree of Cognitive Impairment in a Memory Clinic Population.. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 96(2), 777-788Yman, J., Helgadóttir, B., Kjellenberg, K. & Nyberg, G. (2023). Associations between organised sports participation, general health, stress, screen-time and sleep duration in adolescents.. Acta Paediatrica, 112(3), 452-459Wu, J., Xiong, Y., Xia, X., Orsini, N., Qiu, C., Kivipelto, M., . . . Wang, R. (2023). Can dementia risk be reduced by following the American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7?: A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis.. Ageing Research Reviews, 83, Article ID 101788. Nyberg, G., Helgadóttir, B., Kjellenberg, K. & Ekblom, Ö. (2023). COVID-19 and unfavorable changes in mental health unrelated to changes in physical activity, sedentary time, and health behaviors among Swedish adolescents: A longitudinal study.. Frontiers In Public Health, 11, Article ID 1115789. Helgadóttir, B., Fröberg, A., Kjellenberg, K., Ekblom, Ö. & Nyberg, G. (2023). COVID-19 induced changes in physical activity patterns, screen time and sleep among Swedish adolescents - a cohort study.. BMC Public Health, 23(1), Article ID 380. Kjellenberg, K., Heiland, E. G., Tarassova, O., Fernström, M., Nyberg, G., Ekblom, M., . . . Ekblom, Ö. (2023). Effects of physical activity breaks on working memory and oxygenated hemoglobin in adolescents: Results from the AbbaH teen study. In: : . Paper presented at ArtScientific 2023, Frankfurt, Germany, May 5-6, 2023.
The twin project – Twin-based studies on the importance of genes and environment in associations between physical activity patterns and brain health in adolescents; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH; Publications
Ekblom, M., Ekblom, Ö., Wiklund, C. & Wang, R. (2023). Environmental and genetic contributions to device-based measures of physical activity in Swedish 9-year-olds.. In: : . Paper presented at ISBNPA, International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity annual meeting, June 14-17, 2023, Uppsala, Sweden.
What can motor function tell us about cognitive aging and dementia? A multidisciplinary approach towards precision medicine [VR 2022-01404]; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH; Publications
Larsson, L. E., Wang, R., Cederholm, T., Wiggenraad, F., Rydén, M., Hagman, G., . . . Thunborg, C. (2023). Association of Sarcopenia and Its Defining Components with the Degree of Cognitive Impairment in a Memory Clinic Population.. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 96(2), 777-788Wu, J., Xiong, Y., Xia, X., Orsini, N., Qiu, C., Kivipelto, M., . . . Wang, R. (2023). Can dementia risk be reduced by following the American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7?: A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis.. Ageing Research Reviews, 83, Article ID 101788. Wang, R., Dekhtyar, S. & Wang, H.-X. (2023). Cognitive Reserve: A Life-Course Perspective. In: Petrosini, Laura (Ed.), Neurobiological and Psychological Aspects of Brain Recovery: (pp. 121-135). Springer Publishing Company
Exploring neighbourhood effects on aging: An opportunity for enhancing brain health across the lifespan [KK 20220202]; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH; Publications
Larsson, L. E., Wang, R., Cederholm, T., Wiggenraad, F., Rydén, M., Hagman, G., . . . Thunborg, C. (2023). Association of Sarcopenia and Its Defining Components with the Degree of Cognitive Impairment in a Memory Clinic Population.. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 96(2), 777-788
Organisations
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7209-741x

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