Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH

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Publications (10 of 16) Show all publications
Bolam, K., Bojsen-Møller, E., Wallin, P., Paulsson, S., Lindwall, M., Rundqvist, H. & Ekblom Bak, E. (2024). Association between change in cardiorespiratory fitness and prostate cancer incidence and mortality in 57 652 Swedish men.. British Journal of Sports Medicine
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between change in cardiorespiratory fitness and prostate cancer incidence and mortality in 57 652 Swedish men.
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2024 (English)In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To examine the associations between changes in cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in adulthood and prostate cancer incidence and mortality.

METHODS: In this prospective study, men who completed an occupational health profile assessment including at least two valid submaximal CRF tests, performed on a cycle ergometer, were included in the study. Data on prostate cancer incidence and mortality were derived from national registers. HRs and CIs were calculated using Cox proportional hazard regression with inverse probability treatment weights of time-varying covariates.

RESULTS: During a mean follow-up time of 6.7 years (SD 4.9), 592 (1%) of the 57 652 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer, and 46 (0.08%) died with prostate cancer as the primary cause of death. An increase in absolute CRF (as % of L/min) was associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer incidence (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.96 to 0.99) but not mortality, in the fully adjusted model. When participants were grouped as having increased (+3%), stable (±3%) or decreased (-3%) CRF, those with increased fitness also had a reduced risk of prostate cancer incidence compared with those with decreased fitness (HR 0.65, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.86), in the fully adjusted model.

CONCLUSION: In this study of employed Swedish men, change in CRF was inversely associated with risk of prostate cancer incidence, but not mortality. Change in CRF appears to be important for reducing the risk of prostate cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2024
Keywords
Physical fitness
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Urology and Nephrology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-8093 (URN)10.1136/bjsports-2023-107007 (DOI)38290798 (PubMedID)
Projects
HPI-gruppen
Available from: 2024-02-02 Created: 2024-02-02 Last updated: 2024-02-22
Ekblom Bak, E., Bojsen-Møller, E., Wallin, P., Paulsson, S., Lindwall, M., Rundqvist, H. & Bolam, K. (2023). Association Between Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Cancer Incidence and Cancer-Specific Mortality of Colon, Lung, and Prostate Cancer Among Swedish Men.. JAMA Network Open, 6(6), Article ID e2321102.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association Between Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Cancer Incidence and Cancer-Specific Mortality of Colon, Lung, and Prostate Cancer Among Swedish Men.
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2023 (English)In: JAMA Network Open, E-ISSN 2574-3805, Vol. 6, no 6, article id e2321102Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

IMPORTANCE: Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) levels appear to be an important risk factor for cancer incidence and death.

OBJECTIVES: To examine CRF and prostate, colon, and lung cancer incidence and mortality in Swedish men, and to assess whether age moderated any associations between CRF and cancer.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A prospective cohort study was conducted in a population of men who completed an occupational health profile assessment between October 1982 and December 2019 in Sweden. Data analysis was performed from June 22, 2022, to May 11, 2023.

EXPOSURE: Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed as maximal oxygen consumption, estimated using a submaximal cycle ergometer test.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Data on prostate, colon, and lung cancer incidence and mortality were derived from national registers. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression.

RESULTS: Data on 177 709 men (age range, 18-75 years; mean [SD] age, 42 [11] years; mean [SD] body mass index, 26 [3.8]) were analyzed. During a mean (SD) follow-up time of 9.6 (5.5) years, a total of 499 incident cases of colon, 283 of lung, and 1918 of prostate cancer occurred, as well as 152 deaths due to colon cancer, 207 due to lung cancer, and 141 deaths due to prostate cancer. Higher levels of CRF (maximal oxygen consumption as milliliters per minute per kilogram) were associated with a significantly lower risk of colon (HR, 0.98, 95% CI, 0.96-0.98) and lung cancer (HR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96-0.99) incidence, and a higher risk of prostate cancer incidence (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.00-1.01). Higher CRF was associated with a lower risk of death due to colon (HR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96-1.00), lung (HR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.95-0.99), and prostate (HR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.93-0.97) cancer. After stratification into 4 groups and in fully adjusted models, the associations remained for moderate (>35-45 mL/min/kg), 0.72 (0.53-0.96) and high (>45 mL/min/kg), 0.63 (0.41-0.98) levels of CRF, compared with very low (<25 mL/min/kg) CRF for colon cancer incidence. For prostate cancer mortality, associations remained for low (HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.45-1.00), moderate (HR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.34-0.97), and high (HR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.10-0.86) CRF. For lung cancer mortality, only high CRF (HR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.17-0.99) was significant. Age modified the associations for lung (HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.99-0.99) and prostate (HR, 1.00; 95% CI, 1.00-1.00; P < .001) cancer incidence, and for death due to lung cancer (HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.99-0.99; P = .04).

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: In this cohort of Swedish men, moderate and high CRF were associated with a lower risk of colon cancer. Low, moderate, and high CRF were associated with lower risk of death due to prostate cancer, while only high CRF was associated with lower risk of death due to lung cancer. If evidence for causality is established, interventions to improve CRF in individuals with low CRF should be prioritized.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Medical Association (AMA), 2023
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7722 (URN)10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2023.21102 (DOI)001059352200007 ()37382952 (PubMedID)
Projects
HPI-gruppen
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society, 21 1837
Available from: 2023-08-21 Created: 2023-08-21 Last updated: 2024-01-11
Henning, G., Stenling, A., Tafvelin, S., Ebener, M. & Lindwall, M. (2023). Levels and change in autonomous and controlled work motivation in older workers: The role of proximity to retirement and sense of community at work. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 96(1), 33-55
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Levels and change in autonomous and controlled work motivation in older workers: The role of proximity to retirement and sense of community at work
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, ISSN 0963-1798, E-ISSN 2044-8325, Vol. 96, no 1, p. 33-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous studies suggest a preretirement disengagement process from work, which includes reduced work motivation. In this study, we investigated changes in autonomous and controlled work motivation over two years among participants of the Health, Aging and Retirement Transition in Sweden (HEARTS) study. We found stability in both types of motivation; however, those who retired after the study period showed more distinct declines in autonomous motivation. A stronger sense of community at work was related to level, but not change in autonomous motivation. Intra-individual fluctuations in the expected retirement age did not predict work motivation or vice versa. Future studies are needed to better understand the antecedents and consequences of preretirement declines in autonomous work motivation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
retirement, self-determination theory, work motivation
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7387 (URN)10.1111/joop.12406 (DOI)000871026700001 ()
Available from: 2022-11-15 Created: 2022-11-15 Last updated: 2023-03-07
Agahi, N., Kelfve, S., Hassing, L. B. & Lindwall, M. (2022). Alcohol Consumption Over the Retirement Transition in Sweden: Different Trajectories Based on Education. Work, Aging and Retirement, 8(1), 74-81
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alcohol Consumption Over the Retirement Transition in Sweden: Different Trajectories Based on Education
2022 (English)In: Work, Aging and Retirement, ISSN 2054-4642, E-ISSN 2054-4650, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 74-81Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Retirement is a major life transition that involves changes to everyday routines, roles, and habits. Previous studies suggest that retirement may influence drinking habits. Many natural inhibitors of alcohol consumption disappear with the removal of work constraints. The potential impact depends on both individual and contextual factors. Women in the cohorts undergoing retirement now have been more active on the labor market, including the occupation of higher status jobs, which indicates more financial resources as well as a larger role loss after retirement. Also, the current cohorts who retire have had more liberal drinking habits throughout their lives compared to previous cohorts. We therefore examined changes in alcohol consumption surrounding retirement in different education groups among women and men undergoing retirement using annual data from the Health, Aging and Retirement Transitions in Sweden (HEARTS) study, a longitudinal national study of 60- to 66-year-olds (n = 5,913), from 2015 to 2018. Latent growth curve models were used to estimate trajectories of alcohol consumption. Results showed that those who retired during the follow-up increased their usual weekly alcohol consumption while those who worked or were retired throughout the period had stable drinking habits. Those who were retired reported the highest alcohol consumption. The increase surrounding retirement was driven by people with higher education. Women with tertiary education and men with intermediate or tertiary education increased their weekly alcohol intake after retirement, while those with low education had unchanged drinking habits. Mechanisms and motivations that may fuel increased alcohol intake among people with higher education should be further investigated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2022
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6630 (URN)10.1093/workar/waab004 (DOI)000745661100006 ()
Available from: 2021-04-09 Created: 2021-04-09 Last updated: 2022-02-08
Stenling, A., Eriksson Sörman, D., Lindwall, M. & Machado, L. (2022). Bidirectional Within- and Between-Person Relations Between Physical Activity and Cognitive Function. The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, 77(4), 704-709
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bidirectional Within- and Between-Person Relations Between Physical Activity and Cognitive Function
2022 (English)In: The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, ISSN 1079-5014, E-ISSN 1758-5368, Vol. 77, no 4, p. 704-709Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To examine bidirectional within- and between-person relations between physical activity and cognitive function across 15 years.

Methods: Participants (N = 1722, age range 40-85 years, 55% women) were drawn from the Betula prospective cohort study. We included four waves of data. Bivariate latent curve models with structured residuals were estimated to examine bidirectional within- and between-person relations between physical activity and cognitive function (episodic memory recall, verbal fluency, visuospatial ability).

Results: We observed no statistically significant bidirectional within-person relations over time. Higher levels of physical activity at baseline were related to less decline in episodic memory recall. Positive occasion-specific within- and between-person relations were observed, with the most consistent being between physical activity and episodic memory recall.

Discussion: The lack of bidirectional within-person relations indicate that shorter time lags may be needed to capture time-ordered within-person relations. The link between higher physical activity at baseline and less decline in episodic memory recall over time may indicate a protective effect of physical activity on episodic memory recall.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2022
Keywords
adults, cognition, exercise, reciprocal relations
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7012 (URN)10.1093/geronb/gbab234 (DOI)000756738800001 ()34940838 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-00273Swedish Research Council, K2010-61X-21446-01Swedish Research Council, 345-2003-3883Swedish Research Council, 315-2004-6977Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationRiksbankens Jubileumsfond, 1988-0082:17Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, J2001-0682
Available from: 2022-03-15 Created: 2022-03-15 Last updated: 2022-04-22
Henning, G., Johansson, B., Lindwall, M. & Huxhold, O. (2022). Retirement Adjustment in Germany From 1996 to 2014. Work, Aging and Retirement, 8(3), 304-321
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Retirement Adjustment in Germany From 1996 to 2014
2022 (English)In: Work, Aging and Retirement, ISSN 2054-4642, E-ISSN 2054-4650, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 304-321Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The context of retirement has changed over the last decades, but there is little knowledge on whether the quality of retirement adjustment has changed as well. Changes in retirement regulations and historical differences in resources may affect the quality of adjustment and increase inequalities between different socioeconomic groups. In the present study, we investigated historical differences in retirement adjustment by comparing cross-sectional samples of retirees from 1996, 2002, 2008, and 2014, based on the population-based German Ageing Survey. Adjustment was measured with three different indicators (perceived change in life after retirement, retirement satisfaction, adjustment difficulties). Retirement satisfaction was higher in later samples, but for the other two outcomes, there was no evidence for systematic increases or decreases in levels of retirement adjustment with historical time over the studied period. White-collar workers reported better adjustment than blue-collar workers did, and for two of three outcomes, this effect was stable over time. The white-collar workers’ advantage concerning retirement satisfaction, however, increased. We conclude that in Germany, at least for those who retire within the usual time window, adjustment quality has not changed systematically over the examined 18-year period. We only found mixed evidence for a growing social inequality in the retirement adjustment. However, as individual agency in choosing one’s retirement timing and pathway is increasingly restricted, social inequalities in well-being before retirement may increase.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2022
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6869 (URN)10.1093/workar/waab027 (DOI)000764702500001 ()
Available from: 2021-12-02 Created: 2021-12-02 Last updated: 2022-11-21
Ivarsson, A., Stenling, A., Weman Josefsson, K., Höglind, S. & Lindwall, M. (2021). Associations between physical activity and core affects within and across days: a daily diary study.. Psychology and Health, 36(1), 43-58
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between physical activity and core affects within and across days: a daily diary study.
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2021 (English)In: Psychology and Health, ISSN 0887-0446, E-ISSN 1476-8321, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 43-58Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The objective of the present study was to investigate (a) if daily physical activity at the within-person level is related to four different core affects the same evening, (b) if core affects in the evening predict physical activity the following day, and (c) if physical activity predicts core affects the following day.

Design: A total of 166 university students were asked to complete the affect and physical activity measures once a day (in the evening), for seven days. Bivariate unconditional latent curve model analyses with structured residuals were performed to investigate the relations within days and across days between the core affects and physical activity.

Main outcome measures: Core affects and physical activity.

Results: Physical activity had positive within-day associations with pleasant-activated and pleasant-deactivated core affects and a negative within-day association with unpleasant-deactivated affective responses. There were, however, no statistically significant relations between core affects and physical activity across days.

Conclusion: These results highlight that the measurement interval might be an important factor that influences the association between core affects and physical activity behaviors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2021
Keywords
Core affects, intensive longitudinal design, latent curve model with structured residuals, physical activity
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6147 (URN)10.1080/08870446.2020.1745801 (DOI)000524110900001 ()32241180 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-04-08 Created: 2020-04-08 Last updated: 2021-02-15
Stenling, A., Henning, G., Bjalkebring, P., Tafvelin, S., Kivi, M., Johansson, B. & Lindwall, M. (2021). Basic psychological need satisfaction across the retirement transition: Changes and longitudinal associations with depressive symptoms. Motivation and Emotion, 45, 75-90
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Basic psychological need satisfaction across the retirement transition: Changes and longitudinal associations with depressive symptoms
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2021 (English)In: Motivation and Emotion, ISSN 0146-7239, E-ISSN 1573-6644, Vol. 45, p. 75-90Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Drawing on self-determination theory, the present study examined how satisfaction of the basic psychological needs (autonomy, competence, and relatedness) changes across the retirement transition and how need satisfaction was related to depressive symptoms across the retirement transition. Participants (N = 2655) were drawn from the HEalth, Ageing and Retirement Transitions in Sweden (HEARTS) study. Latent growth curve modeling showed that autonomy need satisfaction increased across the retirement transition, whereas competence and relatedness remained relatively stable. Higher need satisfaction was related to less depressive symptoms at baseline, however, pre-retirement need satisfaction was not a statistically significant predictor of subsequent changes in depressive symptoms (or vice versa) across the retirement transition. At the within-person level, higher than usual need satisfaction at a specific time point was related to less than usual depressive symptoms. Need satisfaction may be an important factor to consider across the retirement transition and need satisfying activities prior, during, and after the transition may ease peoples' adjustment to retirement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Publishing Company, 2021
Keywords
HEARTS study, Need satisfaction, Retirement, Self-determination theory, Well-being
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6321 (URN)10.1007/s11031-020-09854-2 (DOI)000566335000001 ()
Available from: 2020-10-05 Created: 2020-10-05 Last updated: 2021-11-02
Ekblom Bak, E., Väisänen, D., Ekblom, B., Blom, V., Kallings, L., Hemmingsson, E., . . . Lönn, A. (2021). Cardiorespiratory fitness and lifestyle on severe COVID-19 risk in 279,455 adults: a case control study.. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 18(1), Article ID 135.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiorespiratory fitness and lifestyle on severe COVID-19 risk in 279,455 adults: a case control study.
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2021 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, E-ISSN 1479-5868, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 135Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The impact of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and other lifestyle-related factors on severe COVID-19 risk is understudied. The present study aims to investigate lifestyle-related and socioeconomic factors as possible predictors of COVID-19, with special focus on CRF, and to further study whether these factors may attenuate obesity- and hypertension-related risks, as well as mediate associations between socioeconomic factors and severe COVID-19 risk.

METHODS: Out of initially 407,131 participants who participated in nationwide occupational health service screening between 1992 and 2020, n = 857 cases (70% men, mean age 49.9 years) of severe COVID-19 were identified. CRF was estimated using a sub-maximum cycle test, and other lifestyle variables were self-reported. Analyses were performed including both unmatched, n = 278,598, and sex-and age-matched, n = 3426, controls. Severe COVID-19 included hospitalization, intensive care or death due to COVID-19.

RESULTS: Patients with more severe COVID-19 had significantly lower CRF, higher BMI, a greater presence of comorbidities and were more often daily smokers. In matched analyses, there was a graded decrease in odds for severe COVID-19 with each ml in CRF (OR = 0.98, 95% CI 0.970 to 0.998), and a two-fold increase in odds between the lowest and highest (< 32 vs. ≥ 46 ml·min-1·kg-1) CRF group. Higher BMI (per unit increase, OR = 1.09, 1.06 to 1.12), larger waist circumference (per cm, OR = 1.04, 1.02 to 1.06), daily smoking (OR = 0.60, 0.41 to 0.89) and high overall stress (OR = 1.36, 1.001 to 1.84) also remained significantly associated with severe COVID-19 risk. Obesity- and blood pressure-related risks were attenuated by adjustment for CRF and lifestyle variables. Mediation through CRF, BMI and smoking accounted for 9% to 54% of the associations between low education, low income and blue collar/low skilled occupations and severe COVID-19 risk. The results were consistent using either matched or unmatched controls.

CONCLUSIONS: Both lifestyle-related and socioeconomic factors were associated with risk of severe COVID-19. However, higher CRF attenuated the risk associated with obesity and high blood pressure, and mediated the risk associated with various socioeconomic factors. This emphasises the importance of interventions to maintain or increase CRF in the general population to strengthen the resilience to severe COVID-19, especially in high-risk individuals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2021
Keywords
Cardiorespiratory fitness, Lifestyle, Obesity, Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, Socioeconomics
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6827 (URN)10.1186/s12966-021-01198-5 (DOI)000708860700001 ()34666788 (PubMedID)
Projects
HPI-gruppen
Available from: 2021-10-22 Created: 2021-10-22 Last updated: 2024-01-17
Blom, V., Lönn, A., Ekblom, B., Kallings, L., Väisänen, D., Hemmingsson, E., . . . Ekblom Bak, E. (2021). Lifestyle Habits and Mental Health in Light of the Two COVID-19 Pandemic Waves in Sweden, 2020. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18(6), Article ID 3313.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lifestyle Habits and Mental Health in Light of the Two COVID-19 Pandemic Waves in Sweden, 2020
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2021 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 6, article id 3313Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The COVID-19 pandemic has become a public health emergency of international concern, which may have affected lifestyle habits and mental health. Based on national health profile assessments, this study investigated perceived changes of lifestyle habits in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and associations between perceived lifestyle changes and mental health in Swedish working adults. Among 5599 individuals (50% women, 46.3 years), the majority reported no change (sitting 77%, daily physical activity 71%, exercise 69%, diet 87%, alcohol 90%, and smoking 97%) due to the pandemic. Changes were more pronounced during the first wave (April–June) compared to the second (October–December). Women, individuals &lt;60 years, those with a university degree, white-collar workers, and those with unhealthy lifestyle habits at baseline had higher odds of changing lifestyle habits compared to their counterparts. Negative changes in lifestyle habits and more time in a mentally passive state sitting at home were associated with higher odds of mental ill-health (including health anxiety regarding one’s own and relatives’ health, generalized anxiety and depression symptoms, and concerns regarding employment and economy). The results emphasize the need to support healthy lifestyle habits to strengthen the resilience in vulnerable groups of individuals to future viral pandemics and prevent health inequalities in society.

Keywords
physical activity, sitting, alcohol, diet, smoking, SARS-CoV-2, Sweden, mental health, health anxiety, depression
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6611 (URN)10.3390/ijerph18063313 (DOI)000639241400001 ()33806951 (PubMedID)
Projects
HPI-gruppen
Available from: 2021-03-23 Created: 2021-03-23 Last updated: 2022-12-01
Projects
E-PABS - a centre of Excellence in Physical Activity, healthy Brain functions and Sustainability [20210002 01 H]; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH; Publications
Hoy, S., Larsson, H., Kjellenberg, K., Nyberg, G., Ekblom, Ö. & Helgadóttir, B. (2024). Gendered relations? Associations between Swedish parents, siblings, and adolescents' time spent sedentary and physically active. Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, 6, Article ID 1236848. Heiland, E. G., Kjellenberg, K., Tarassova, O., Nyberg, G., Ekblom, M., Ekblom, Ö. & Helgadóttir, B. (2023). Acute effects of nitrate and breakfast on working memory and cerebral blood flow in adolescents: a randomized crossover trial. In: : . Paper presented at The International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA), Uppsala, Sweden, June 15-18, 2023. Regan, C., Heiland, E. G., Ekblom, Ö., Tarassova, O., Kjellenberg, K., Larsen, F. J., . . . Helgadóttir, B. (2023). Acute effects of nitrate and breakfast on working memory, cerebral blood flow, arterial stiffness, and psychological factors in adolescents: Study protocol for a randomised crossover trial.. PLOS ONE, 18(5), Article ID e0285581. Farias, L., Nyberg, G., Helgadóttir, B. & Andermo, S. (2023). Adolescents' experiences of a school-based health promotion intervention in socioeconomically advantaged and disadvantaged areas in Sweden: a qualitative process evaluation study.. BMC Public Health, 23(1), Article ID 1631. Larsson, L. E., Wang, R., Cederholm, T., Wiggenraad, F., Rydén, M., Hagman, G., . . . Thunborg, C. (2023). Association of Sarcopenia and Its Defining Components with the Degree of Cognitive Impairment in a Memory Clinic Population.. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 96(2), 777-788Yman, J., Helgadóttir, B., Kjellenberg, K. & Nyberg, G. (2023). Associations between organised sports participation, general health, stress, screen-time and sleep duration in adolescents.. Acta Paediatrica, 112(3), 452-459Wu, J., Xiong, Y., Xia, X., Orsini, N., Qiu, C., Kivipelto, M., . . . Wang, R. (2023). Can dementia risk be reduced by following the American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7?: A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis.. Ageing Research Reviews, 83, Article ID 101788. Nyberg, G., Helgadóttir, B., Kjellenberg, K. & Ekblom, Ö. (2023). COVID-19 and unfavorable changes in mental health unrelated to changes in physical activity, sedentary time, and health behaviors among Swedish adolescents: A longitudinal study.. Frontiers In Public Health, 11, Article ID 1115789. Helgadóttir, B., Fröberg, A., Kjellenberg, K., Ekblom, Ö. & Nyberg, G. (2023). COVID-19 induced changes in physical activity patterns, screen time and sleep among Swedish adolescents - a cohort study.. BMC Public Health, 23(1), Article ID 380. Kjellenberg, K., Heiland, E. G., Tarassova, O., Fernström, M., Nyberg, G., Ekblom, M., . . . Ekblom, Ö. (2023). Effects of physical activity breaks on working memory and oxygenated hemoglobin in adolescents: Results from the AbbaH teen study. In: : . Paper presented at ArtScientific 2023, Frankfurt, Germany, May 5-6, 2023.
Cardiorespiratory fitness in early-life and adulthood and brain health later in life; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIHThe WORK TOGETHER program: Using a systems approach to update an occupational health service and reduce the health gap [2023-01126]; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2066-6235

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