Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Helgadóttir, BjörgORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6170-8251
Publications (2 of 2) Show all publications
Svedberg, P., Helgadóttir, B., Mather, L., Narusyte, J., Ropponen, A. & Blom, V. (2019). Do poor health behaviors have an impact on the transition from sick leave to disability pension?. In: European Journal of Public Health: Volume 29, Supplement 4, November 2019. Paper presented at 12th European Public Health Conference Building bridges for solidarity and public health Marseille, France 20th–23rd November 2019 (pp. 66-66). Oxford University Press, 29
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do poor health behaviors have an impact on the transition from sick leave to disability pension?
Show others...
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health: Volume 29, Supplement 4, November 2019, Oxford University Press, 2019, Vol. 29, p. 66-66Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: High age, being a woman, and having low socioeconomic status are among the important risk factors for transitioning from sickness absence (SA) to disability pension (DP). But, little is known about the effect of poor health behaviors, although there are indications that poor health behaviors increase the risk of both SA and DP. The aims were to study the associations between three poor health behaviors (current smoking, high alcohol consumption and low physical activity levels) and DP among individuals who recently been sickness absent, and to explore whether having multiple poor health behaviors increased the risk of transitioning from SA to DP. Methods: This prospective cohort study included 1991 twin individuals aged 20-46 who participated in a survey in 2005 and who had been on long-term SA in the two years preceding baseline (date of answering the survey) data collection of health behaviors (smoking, alcohol and physical activity) and relevant covariates. The participants were followed up for incident all-cause DP until the 31st of December 2012 (mean follow-up 5.2 years). National register data of SA and DP were used, and the association between each health behavior and DP was estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. The results are presented as Hazard Ratios (HR) with 95% Confidence Intervals (CI). Results: Results showed that compared to never smoking, current smoking was associated with a higher risk of transitioning from SA to DP (HR 1.76, 95%CI 1.08-2.84). Alcohol use, lack of physical activity or having several poor health behaviors showed no significant associations. Conclusions: Being a current smoker influences the risk of transitioning from SA to DP. Poor health behaviors are well established risk factors for poor physical and mental health. Hence, from a public health perspective it is important to emphasize the value of improving health behaviors in general but also among people with a history of SA. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5942 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckz185.165 (DOI)
Conference
12th European Public Health Conference Building bridges for solidarity and public health Marseille, France 20th–23rd November 2019
Available from: 2019-12-02 Created: 2019-12-02 Last updated: 2019-12-04Bibliographically approved
Helgadóttir, B., Mather, L., Narusyte, J., Ropponen, A., Blom, V. & Svedberg, P. (2019). Transitioning from sickness absence to disability pension - the impact of poor health behaviours: a prospective Swedish twin cohort study.. BMJ Open, 9(11), Article ID e031889.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transitioning from sickness absence to disability pension - the impact of poor health behaviours: a prospective Swedish twin cohort study.
Show others...
2019 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 11, article id e031889Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between three poor health behaviours (current smoker, high consumption of alcohol and low physical activity levels) and the transition to disability pension (DP) among individuals who have recently been sickness absent. Furthermore, we aimed to explore whether having multiple poor health behaviours increased the risk of transitioning from sickness absence (SA) to DP.

DESIGN: Prospective twin cohort study.

SETTING: Sweden.

PARTICIPANTS: Twins aged 20-46 who had participated in a survey and been on SA (>14 days) in the year preceding baseline (date of answering the questionnaire).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Incident DP during the follow-up which ended on 31 December 2012 (mean 5.2 years). A national register with full coverage provided data on DP.

RESULTS: The Cox proportional-hazards regression analyses showed that current smokers had a higher risk of transitioning from SA to DP compared with never smokers (HR 1.76; 95% CI 1.08 to 2.84). Alcohol use and lack of physical activity as well as poor health behaviour sum score showed no significant associations.

CONCLUSIONS: Being a current smoker influences the transition from SA to DP. Although non-significant, there were indications that more physical activity and fewer poor health behaviours could reduce the risk of exiting the labour market through DP. Improving health behaviours among people on SA could be a valuable tool for preventing the transition to DP.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
alcohol consumption, cohort study, physical activity, sick leave, smoking
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5930 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2019-031889 (DOI)31712343 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-11-29 Created: 2019-11-29 Last updated: 2019-12-04
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6170-8251

Search in DiVA

Show all publications