Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH

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Publications (10 of 19) Show all publications
Goldberg, Y., Segal, S., Hamdi, L., Nabat, H., Fainstein, N., Mediouni, E., . . . Einstein, O. (2023). High-intensity interval training attenuates development of autoimmune encephalomyelitis solely by systemic immunomodulation.. Scientific Reports, 13(1), Article ID 16513.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High-intensity interval training attenuates development of autoimmune encephalomyelitis solely by systemic immunomodulation.
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2023 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 16513Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The impact of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on the central nervous system (CNS) in autoimmune neuroinflammation is not known. The aim of this study was to determine the direct effects of HIIT on the CNS and development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Healthy mice were subjected to HIIT by treadmill running and the proteolipid protein (PLP) transfer EAE model was utilized. To examine neuroprotection, PLP-reactive lymph-node cells (LNCs) were transferred to HIIT and sedentary (SED) mice. To examine immunomodulation, PLP-reactive LNCs from HIIT and SED donor mice were transferred to naïve recipients and analyzed in vitro. HIIT in recipient mice did not affect the development of EAE following exposure to PLP-reactive LNCs. HIIT mice exhibited enhanced migration of systemic autoimmune cells into the CNS and increased demyelination. In contrast, EAE severity in recipient mice injected with PLP-reactive LNCs from HIIT donor mice was significantly diminished. The latter positive effect was associated with decreased migration of autoimmune cells into the CNS and inhibition of very late antigen (VLA)-4 expression in LNCs. Thus, the beneficial effect of HIIT on EAE development is attributed solely to systemic immunomodulatory effects, likely because of systemic inhibition of autoreactive cell migration and reduced VLA-4 integrin expression.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2023
National Category
Immunology in the medical area
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7893 (URN)10.1038/s41598-023-43534-8 (DOI)37783693 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-10-06 Created: 2023-10-06 Last updated: 2023-10-06
Blackwood, S. J., Horwath, O., Moberg, M., Pontén, M., Apro, W., Ekblom, M., . . . Katz, A. (2023). Insulin resistance after a 3-day fast is associated with an increased capacity of skeletal muscle to oxidize lipids.. American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, 324(5), E390-E401
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Insulin resistance after a 3-day fast is associated with an increased capacity of skeletal muscle to oxidize lipids.
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2023 (English)In: American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0193-1849, E-ISSN 1522-1555, Vol. 324, no 5, p. E390-E401Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a debate on whether lipid-mediated insulin resistance derives from an increased or decreased capacity of muscle to oxidize fats. Here we examine the involvement of muscle fiber composition in the metabolic responses to a 3-day fast (starvation, which results in increases in plasma lipids and insulin resistance) in two groups of healthy young subjects: 1, area occupied by type I fibers = 61.0 ± 11.8%; 2, type I area = 36.0 ± 4.9% (P<0.001). Muscle biopsies and intravenous glucose tolerance tests were performed after an overnight fast and after starvation. Biopsies were analyzed for muscle fiber composition and mitochondrial respiration. Indices of glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were determined. Glucose tolerance was similar in both groups after an overnight fast and deteriorated to a similar degree in both groups after starvation. In contrast, whole-body insulin sensitivity decreased markedly after starvation in group 1 (P<0.01), whereas the decrease in group 2 was substantially smaller (P=0.06). Non-esterified fatty acids and β-hydroxybutyrate levels in plasma after an overnight fast were similar between groups and increased markedly and comparably in both groups after starvation, demonstrating similar degrees of lipid load. The capacity of permeabilized muscle fibers to oxidize lipids was significantly higher in group 1 vs. 2, whereas there was no significant difference in pyruvate oxidation between groups. The data demonstrate that loss of whole-body insulin sensitivity after short-term starvation is a function of muscle fiber composition and is associated with an elevated rather than a diminished capacity of muscle to oxidize lipids.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Physiological Society, 2023
Keywords
glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, mitochondrial respiration, muscle fiber composition, starvation
National Category
Physiology Endocrinology and Diabetes
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7521 (URN)10.1152/ajpendo.00317.2022 (DOI)000974241700002 ()36791323 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-03-03 Created: 2023-03-03 Last updated: 2024-01-11
Flockhart, M., Tischer, D., Nilsson, L. C., Blackwood, S. J., Ekblom, B., Katz, A., . . . Larsen, F. J. (2023). Reduced glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity after prolonged exercise in endurance athletes.. Acta Physiologica, 238(4), Article ID e13972.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reduced glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity after prolonged exercise in endurance athletes.
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2023 (English)In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 238, no 4, article id e13972Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: The purpose of this study was to 1. investigate if glucose tolerance is affected after one acute bout of different types of exercise; 2. assess if potential differences between two exercise paradigms are related to changes in mitochondrial function; and 3. determine if endurance athletes differ from nonendurance-trained controls in their metabolic responses to the exercise paradigms.

METHODS: Nine endurance athletes (END) and eight healthy nonendurance-trained controls (CON) were studied. Oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) and mitochondrial function were assessed on three occasions: in the morning, 14 h after an overnight fast without prior exercise (RE), as well as after 3 h of prolonged continuous exercise at 65% of VO2 max (PE) or 5 × 4 min at ~95% of VO2 max (HIIT) on a cycle ergometer.

RESULTS: Glucose tolerance was markedly reduced in END after PE compared with RE. END also exhibited elevated fasting serum FFA and ketones levels, reduced insulin sensitivity and glucose oxidation, and increased fat oxidation during the OGTT. CON showed insignificant changes in glucose tolerance and the aforementioned measurements compared with RE. HIIT did not alter glucose tolerance in either group. Neither PE nor HIIT affected mitochondrial function in either group. END also exhibited increased activity of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity in muscle extracts vs. CON.

CONCLUSION: Prolonged exercise reduces glucose tolerance and increases insulin resistance in endurance athletes the following day. These findings are associated with an increased lipid load, a high capacity to oxidize lipids, and increased fat oxidation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
endurance athletes, endurance exercise, glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, mitochondria, reactive oxygen species
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Endocrinology and Diabetes
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7627 (URN)10.1111/apha.13972 (DOI)000972308100001 ()37017615 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, P2017-0067, P2018-0083, P2019-0062, P2020-0061
Note

At the time of Mikael Flockhart's dissertation, this article was a submitted manuscript.

Available from: 2023-05-08 Created: 2023-05-08 Last updated: 2023-08-29
Nordström, F., Liegnell, R., Apro, W., Blackwood, S. J., Katz, A. & Moberg, M. (2023). The lactate receptor GPR81 is predominantly expressed in type II human skeletal muscle fibers: potential for lactate autocrine signaling.. Paper presented at 324(2):C477-C487. American Journal of Physiology - Cell Physiology, 324(2), C477-C487
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The lactate receptor GPR81 is predominantly expressed in type II human skeletal muscle fibers: potential for lactate autocrine signaling.
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2023 (English)In: American Journal of Physiology - Cell Physiology, ISSN 0363-6143, E-ISSN 1522-1563, Vol. 324, no 2, p. C477-C487Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

GPR81 was first identified in adipocytes as a receptor for L-lactate, which upon binding inhibits cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling. Moreover, incubation of myotubes with lactate augments expression of GPR81 and genes and proteins involved in lactate- and energy metabolism. However, characterization of GPR81 expression and investigation of related signaling in human skeletal muscle under conditions of elevated circulating lactate levels are lacking. Muscle biopsies were obtained from healthy men and women at rest, after leg extension exercise, with or without venous infusion of sodium lactate, and 90 and 180 min after exercise (8 men and 8 women). Analyses included protein and mRNA levels of GPR81, as well as GPR81-dependent signaling molecules. GPR81 expression was 2.5-fold higher in type II glycolytic compared with type I oxidative muscle fibers, and the expression was inversely related to the percentage of type I muscle fibers. Muscle from women expressed about 25% more GPR81 protein than from men. Global PKA-activity increased by 5-8% after exercise, with no differences between trials. CREBS133 phosphorylation was reduced by 30% after exercise and remained repressed during the entire trials, with no influence of the lactate infusion. The mRNA expression of VEGF and PGC-1α were increased by 2.5 - 6-fold during recovery, and that of LDH reduced by 15% with no differences between trials for any gene at any time point. The high expression of GPR81-protein in type II fibers suggests that lactate functions as an autocrine signaling molecule in muscle; however, lactate does not appear to regulate CREB signaling during exercise.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Physiological Society, 2023
Keywords
CREB, HCAR1, PGC-1alpha, PKA, Resistance exercise
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Physiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7464 (URN)10.1152/ajpcell.00443.2022 (DOI)000959663400012 ()36622074 (PubMedID)
Conference
324(2):C477-C487
Available from: 2023-01-11 Created: 2023-01-11 Last updated: 2023-05-18
Katz, A. (2023). The role of glycogen phosphorylase in glycogen biogenesis in skeletal muscle after exercise. Sports Medicine and Health Science, 5(1), 29-33
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of glycogen phosphorylase in glycogen biogenesis in skeletal muscle after exercise
2023 (English)In: Sports Medicine and Health Science, ISSN 2666-3376, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 29-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Initially it was believed that phosphorylase was responsible for both glycogen breakdown and synthesis in the living cell. The discovery of glycogen synthase and McArdle's disease (lack of phosphorylase activity), together with the high Pi/glucose 1-P ratio in skeletal muscle, demonstrated that glycogen synthesis could not be attributed to reversal of the phosphorylase reaction. Rather, glycogen synthesis was attributable solely to the activity of glycogen synthase, subsequent to the transport of glucose into the cell. However, the well-established observation that phosphorylase was inactivated (i.e., dephosphorylated) during the initial recovery period after prior exercise, when the rate of glycogen accumulation is highest and independent of insulin, suggested that phosphorylase could play an active role in glycogen accumulation. But the quantitative contribution of phosphorylase inactivation was not established until recently, when studying isolated murine muscle preparations during recovery from repeated contractions at temperatures ranging from 25 to 35 °C. Thus, in both slow-twitch, oxidative and fast-twitch, glycolytic muscles, inactivation of phosphorylase accounted for 45%–75% of glycogen accumulation during the initial hours of recovery following repeated contractions. Such data indicate that phosphorylase inactivation may be the most important mechanism for glycogen accumulation under defined conditions. These results support the initial belief that phosphorylase plays a quantitative role in glycogen formation in the living cell. However, the mechanism is not via activation of phosphorylase, but rather via inactivation of the enzyme.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Phosphorylase, Glycogen, Glycogen synthase, Muscle, Exercise
National Category
Physiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7426 (URN)10.1016/j.smhs.2022.11.001 (DOI)001107685800001 ()
Available from: 2022-12-02 Created: 2022-12-02 Last updated: 2023-12-12
Katz, A. (2022). A century of exercise physiology: key concepts in regulation of glycogen metabolism in skeletal muscle.. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 122(8), 1751-1772
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A century of exercise physiology: key concepts in regulation of glycogen metabolism in skeletal muscle.
2022 (English)In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 122, no 8, p. 1751-1772Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Glycogen is a branched, glucose polymer and the storage form of glucose in cells. Glycogen has traditionally been viewed as a key substrate for muscle ATP production during conditions of high energy demand and considered to be limiting for work capacity and force generation under defined conditions. Glycogenolysis is catalyzed by phosphorylase, while glycogenesis is catalyzed by glycogen synthase. For many years, it was believed that a primer was required for de novo glycogen synthesis and the protein considered responsible for this process was ultimately discovered and named glycogenin. However, the subsequent observation of glycogen storage in the absence of functional glycogenin raises questions about the true role of the protein. In resting muscle, phosphorylase is generally considered to be present in two forms: non-phosphorylated and inactive (phosphorylase b) and phosphorylated and constitutively active (phosphorylase a). Initially, it was believed that activation of phosphorylase during intense muscle contraction was primarily accounted for by phosphorylation of phosphorylase b (activated by increases in AMP) to a, and that glycogen synthesis during recovery from exercise occurred solely through mechanisms controlled by glucose transport and glycogen synthase. However, it now appears that these views require modifications. Moreover, the traditional roles of glycogen in muscle function have been extended in recent years and in some instances, the original concepts have undergone revision. Thus, despite the extensive amount of knowledge accrued during the past 100 years, several critical questions remain regarding the regulation of glycogen metabolism and its role in living muscle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2022
Keywords
Exercise, Glycogen, Glycogen synthase, Glycogenin, Muscle, Phosphorylase
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7025 (URN)10.1007/s00421-022-04935-1 (DOI)000775865500001 ()35355125 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-04-26 Created: 2022-04-26 Last updated: 2022-09-20
Moberg, M., Apro, W., Horwath, O., van Hall, G., Blackwood, S. J. & Katz, A. (2022). Acute normobaric hypoxia blunts contraction-mediated mTORC1- and JNK-signaling in human skeletal muscle.. Acta Physiologica, 234(2), Article ID e13771.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute normobaric hypoxia blunts contraction-mediated mTORC1- and JNK-signaling in human skeletal muscle.
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2022 (English)In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 234, no 2, article id e13771Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: Hypoxia has been shown to reduce resistance exercise-induced stimulation of protein synthesis and long-term gains in muscle mass. However, the mechanism whereby hypoxia exerts its effect is not clear. Here we examine the effect of acute hypoxia on the activity of several signaling pathways involved in regulation of muscle growth following a bout of resistance exercise.

METHODS: Eight men performed two sessions of leg resistance exercise in Normoxia or Hypoxia (12% O2 ) in a randomized crossover fashion. Muscle biopsies were obtained at rest and at 0, 90,180 min after exercise. Muscle analyses included levels of signaling proteins and metabolites associated with energy turnover.

RESULTS: Exercise during Normoxia induced a 5-10-fold increase of S6K1Thr389 phosphorylation throughout the recovery period, but Hypoxia blunted the increases by ~50%. Phosphorylation of JNKThr183/Tyr185 and the JNK target SMAD2Ser245/250/255 was increased by 30-40-fold immediately after exercise in Normoxia, but Hypoxia blocked almost 70% of the activation. Throughout recovery, phosphorylation of JNK and SMAD2 remained elevated following exercise in Normoxia, but the effect of Hypoxia was lost at 90-180 min post-exercise. Hypoxia had no effect on exercise induced Hippo- or autophagy-signaling and ubiquitin-proteasome related protein levels. Nor did Hypoxia alter the changes induced by exercise in high energy phosphates, glucose 6-P, lactate, or phosphorylation of AMPK or ACC.

CONCLUSION: We conclude that acute severe hypoxia inhibits resistance exercise induced mTORC1- and JNK signaling in human skeletal muscle, effects that do not appear to be mediated by changes in the degree of metabolic stress in the muscle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
Keywords
FSR, Hippo-pathway, Muscle metabolites, deuterium oxide, oxygen
National Category
Physiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6900 (URN)10.1111/apha.13771 (DOI)000744361300001 ()34984845 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, D2017--0012
Available from: 2022-01-10 Created: 2022-01-10 Last updated: 2022-02-08
Hamdi, L., Nabat, H., Goldberg, Y., Fainstein, N., Segal, S., Mediouni, E., . . . Einstein, O. (2022). Exercise training alters autoimmune cell invasion into the brain in autoimmune encephalomyelitis.. Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, 9(11), 1792-1806
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exercise training alters autoimmune cell invasion into the brain in autoimmune encephalomyelitis.
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2022 (English)In: Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, E-ISSN 2328-9503, Vol. 9, no 11, p. 1792-1806Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The mechanisms by which exercise training (ET) elicits beneficial effects on the systemic immune system and the central nervous system (CNS) in autoimmune neuroinflammation are not fully understood.

OBJECTIVES: To investigate (1) the systemic effects of high-intensity continuous training (HICT) on the migratory potential of autoimmune cells; (2) the direct effects of HICT on blood-brain-barrier (BBB) properties.

METHODS: Healthy mice were subjected to high-intensity continuous training (HICT) by treadmill running. The proteolipid protein (PLP) transfer EAE model was utilized to examine the immunomodulatory effects of training, where PLP-reactive lymph-node cells (LNCs) from HICT and sedentary donor mice were analyzed in vitro and transferred to naïve recipients that developed EAE. To examine neuroprotection, encephalitogenic LNCs from donor mice were transferred into HICT or sedentary recipient mice and the BBB was analyzed.

RESULTS: Transfer of PLP-reactive LNCs obtained from HICT donor mice attenuated EAE severity and inflammation in recipient mice. HICT markedly inhibited very late antigen (VLA)-4 and lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 expression in LNCs. Transfer of encephalitogenic LNCs into HICT recipients resulted in milder EAE and attenuated CNS inflammation. HICT reduced BBB permeability and the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 in CNS blood vessels.

INTERPRETATION: HICT attenuates EAE development by both immunomodulatory and neuroprotective effects. The reduction in destructive CNS inflammation in EAE is attributed to systemic inhibition of autoreactive cell migratory potential, as well as reduction in BBB permeability, which are associated with reduced VLA-4/VCAM-1 and LFA-1/ICAM-1 interactions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2022
National Category
Immunology in the medical area
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7377 (URN)10.1002/acn3.51677 (DOI)000865642600001 ()36217574 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-11-10 Created: 2022-11-10 Last updated: 2022-12-16
Blackwood, S. J., Horwath, O., Moberg, M., Pontén, M., Apro, W., Ekblom, M., . . . Katz, A. (2022). Extreme Variations in Muscle Fiber Composition Enable Detection of Insulin Resistance and Excessive Insulin Secretion.. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 107(7), e2729-e2737, Article ID dgac221.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Extreme Variations in Muscle Fiber Composition Enable Detection of Insulin Resistance and Excessive Insulin Secretion.
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 107, no 7, p. e2729-e2737, article id dgac221Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

CONTEXT: Muscle fiber composition is associated with peripheral insulin action.

OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether extreme differences in muscle fiber composition are associated with alterations in peripheral insulin action and secretion in young, healthy subjects who exhibit normal fasting glycemia and insulinemia.

METHODS: Relaxation time following a tetanic contraction was used to identify subjects with a high or low expression of type I muscle fibers: group I (n=11), area occupied by type I muscle fibers = 61.0 ± 11.8%; group II (n=8), type I area = 36.0 ± 4.9% (P<0.001). Biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle and analyzed for mitochondrial respiration on permeabilized fibers, muscle fiber composition and capillary density. An intravenous glucose tolerance test was performed and indices of glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and secretion were determined.

RESULTS: Glucose tolerance was similar between groups, whereas whole-body insulin sensitivity was decreased by ~50% in group II vs group I (P=0.019). First phase insulin release (area under the insulin curve during 10 min after glucose infusion) was increased by almost 4-fold in group II vs I (P=0.01). Whole-body insulin sensitivity was correlated with % area occupied by type I fibers (r=0.54; P=0.018) and capillary density in muscle (r=0.61; P=0.005), but not with mitochondrial respiration. Insulin release was strongly related to % area occupied by type II fibers (r=0.93; P<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Assessment of muscle contractile function in young healthy subjects may prove useful in identifying individuals with insulin resistance and enhanced glucose stimulated insulin secretion prior to onset of clinical manifestations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2022
Keywords
insulin, insulin resistance, insulin secretion, intravenous glucose tolerance test, mitochondrial respiration, muscle fiber type
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Research subject
Medicine/Technology; Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7053 (URN)10.1210/clinem/dgac221 (DOI)000789019300001 ()35405014 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-05-18 Created: 2022-05-18 Last updated: 2022-12-06
Einstein, O., Katz, A. & Ben-Hur, T. (2022). Physical exercise therapy for autoimmune neuroinflammation: Application of knowledge from animal models to patient care.. Autoimmunity Reviews, 21(4), Article ID 103033.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical exercise therapy for autoimmune neuroinflammation: Application of knowledge from animal models to patient care.
2022 (English)In: Autoimmunity Reviews, ISSN 1568-9972, E-ISSN 1873-0183, Vol. 21, no 4, article id 103033Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Physical exercise (PE) impacts various autoimmune diseases. Accordingly, clinical trials demonstrated the safety of PE in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and indicated beneficial outcomes. There is also an increasing body of research on the beneficial effects of exercise on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of MS, and various mechanisms underlying these effects were suggested. However, despite the documented favorable impact of PE on our health, we still lack a thorough understanding of its effects on autoimmune neuroinflammation and specific guidelines of PE therapy for MS patients are lacking. To that end, current findings on the impact of PE on autoimmune neuroinflammation, both in human MS and animal models are reviewed. The concept of personalized PE therapy for autoimmune neuroinflammation is discussed, and future research for providing biological rationale for clinical trials to pave the road for precise PE therapy in MS patients is described.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Autoimmunity, Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, Multiple sclerosis, Neuroinflammation, Physical exercise
National Category
Neurology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6905 (URN)10.1016/j.autrev.2022.103033 (DOI)000797246500012 ()34995760 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-01-13 Created: 2022-01-13 Last updated: 2023-01-04Bibliographically approved
Projects
E-PABS - a centre of Excellence in Physical Activity, healthy Brain functions and Sustainability [20210002 01 H]; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH; Publications
Hoy, S., Larsson, H., Kjellenberg, K., Nyberg, G., Ekblom, Ö. & Helgadóttir, B. (2024). Gendered relations? Associations between Swedish parents, siblings, and adolescents' time spent sedentary and physically active. Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, 6, Article ID 1236848. Heiland, E. G., Kjellenberg, K., Tarassova, O., Nyberg, G., Ekblom, M., Ekblom, Ö. & Helgadóttir, B. (2023). Acute effects of nitrate and breakfast on working memory and cerebral blood flow in adolescents: a randomized crossover trial. In: : . Paper presented at The International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA), Uppsala, Sweden, June 15-18, 2023. Regan, C., Heiland, E. G., Ekblom, Ö., Tarassova, O., Kjellenberg, K., Larsen, F. J., . . . Helgadóttir, B. (2023). Acute effects of nitrate and breakfast on working memory, cerebral blood flow, arterial stiffness, and psychological factors in adolescents: Study protocol for a randomised crossover trial.. PLOS ONE, 18(5), Article ID e0285581. Farias, L., Nyberg, G., Helgadóttir, B. & Andermo, S. (2023). Adolescents' experiences of a school-based health promotion intervention in socioeconomically advantaged and disadvantaged areas in Sweden: a qualitative process evaluation study.. BMC Public Health, 23(1), Article ID 1631. Larsson, L. E., Wang, R., Cederholm, T., Wiggenraad, F., Rydén, M., Hagman, G., . . . Thunborg, C. (2023). Association of Sarcopenia and Its Defining Components with the Degree of Cognitive Impairment in a Memory Clinic Population.. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 96(2), 777-788Yman, J., Helgadóttir, B., Kjellenberg, K. & Nyberg, G. (2023). Associations between organised sports participation, general health, stress, screen-time and sleep duration in adolescents.. Acta Paediatrica, 112(3), 452-459Wu, J., Xiong, Y., Xia, X., Orsini, N., Qiu, C., Kivipelto, M., . . . Wang, R. (2023). Can dementia risk be reduced by following the American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7?: A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis.. Ageing Research Reviews, 83, Article ID 101788. Nyberg, G., Helgadóttir, B., Kjellenberg, K. & Ekblom, Ö. (2023). COVID-19 and unfavorable changes in mental health unrelated to changes in physical activity, sedentary time, and health behaviors among Swedish adolescents: A longitudinal study.. Frontiers In Public Health, 11, Article ID 1115789. Helgadóttir, B., Fröberg, A., Kjellenberg, K., Ekblom, Ö. & Nyberg, G. (2023). COVID-19 induced changes in physical activity patterns, screen time and sleep among Swedish adolescents - a cohort study.. BMC Public Health, 23(1), Article ID 380. Kjellenberg, K., Heiland, E. G., Tarassova, O., Fernström, M., Nyberg, G., Ekblom, M., . . . Ekblom, Ö. (2023). Effects of physical activity breaks on working memory and oxygenated hemoglobin in adolescents: Results from the AbbaH teen study. In: : . Paper presented at ArtScientific 2023, Frankfurt, Germany, May 5-6, 2023.
Plasma markers of neurodegeneration, cognition and physical activity in healthy aging; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIHMuscle to brain cross-talk in the molecular regulation of neuroplasticity [M21-0134_Åke Wiberg]; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIHUse of xenotransfusion to elucidate how exercise training impacts neurofunction [CIF 2023-0083]; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3402-9891

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