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Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Kilger, M. & Blomberg, H. (2020). The construction and legitimizing of a neuroscience concept (CEF) in talent identification. In: Bernard Andrieu (Ed.), The European Association for the Philosophy of Sport (EAPS) Conference 2020: . Paper presented at The European Association for the Philosophy of Sport (EAPS) Conference 2020. Paris: British Philosophy of Sport Association
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The construction and legitimizing of a neuroscience concept (CEF) in talent identification
2020 (English)In: The European Association for the Philosophy of Sport (EAPS) Conference 2020 / [ed] Bernard Andrieu, Paris: British Philosophy of Sport Association , 2020Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Recent scientific debate in sports has come to focus on how neuroscience can help in explaining sports performance and the development of expertise; and in the process of talent identification. It has been argued that instead of relying on coaches’ subjective assessments the process of selection should be based on general metrics of the brain through standardized testing.

 

Cognitive executive functions (CEF) are highlighted as one of most important neurological function in the search for talents. Studies of brain activity have suggested that children should undergo neuroscientific testing to determine the appropriate cognitive executive functions (CEF) for elite sports. This presentation builds on previous work on the implications of a neuroscientific ontology in sports and Bruno Latour’s work on the construction of scientific facts.

 

Using discourse analysis, the presentation discusses the production and popularization of CEF as scientific facts. In our findings we identify how representations of brain activity are visualized and legitimized and how the out-of-context tests are translated into facts about brain functions. The CEF test results are produced as inscriptions of undisputable facts, claiming that the results show prerequisites for sporting success. On the contrary, we argue that the mind-brain-behaviour relationship cannot be reduced to CEF tests. Instead, we urge other researchers to direct a critical gaze on neuroscientific truth-claims and taken-for-granted facts in the area of sport in general and in talent selection in particular.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Paris: British Philosophy of Sport Association, 2020
Keywords
Cognitive executive functions; brain; talent selection; discourse analysis
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6089 (URN)
Conference
The European Association for the Philosophy of Sport (EAPS) Conference 2020
Available from: 2020-03-18 Created: 2020-03-18 Last updated: 2020-03-20Bibliographically approved
Kilger, M. & Aronsson, K. (2019). Being a good sport: Players’ uptake to coaches’ joking in interviews for the youth national team. Sports Coaching Review, 1-23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being a good sport: Players’ uptake to coaches’ joking in interviews for the youth national team
2019 (English)In: Sports Coaching Review, ISSN 2164-0629, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This paper draws on detailed analyses of authentic coach-athlete-interviews during the final selection camp for the Swedish national youth team in hockey. The audio-recorded interviews between the coaches and the individual players (20 players and two national team coaches) covered various issues, involving both the individual players´ goal-setting and sports character, as displayed in his self-presentation during the interview. If the presumptive elite level player presented a vague or low goal or an overly humble self-presentation, this was contested by the coach through jokes, laughter or ironic teasing. Such conversational joking exchanges formed part of each coach´s toolkit for giving critical feedback to interview questions. In their uptake to the coaches playful corrections, the players were expected to engage in po-faced receipt or to laugh along. The selection involved character contests both on the ice rink and in the talk-in-interaction that formed part of the performance appraisal procedure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Humor; assessment sequences; performance appraisal interviews; coach-athlete interaction; character contests
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5731 (URN)10.1080/21640629.2019.1605727 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-05-06 Created: 2019-05-06 Last updated: 2019-05-07Bibliographically approved
Kilger, M. (2019). Blir du valbar lille vän?: Det självreflekterande barnet i urvalssituationer (1ed.). In: Malena Jansson (Ed.), Barnnorm och kroppsform: Om ideal och sexualitet i barnkulturen (pp. 62-74). Stockholm: Centrum för barnkulturforskning
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Blir du valbar lille vän?: Det självreflekterande barnet i urvalssituationer
2019 (Swedish)In: Barnnorm och kroppsform: Om ideal och sexualitet i barnkulturen / [ed] Malena Jansson, Stockholm: Centrum för barnkulturforskning , 2019, 1, p. 62-74Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Vi är idag ständigt värderade och bedömda: som hyresvärdar på Airbnb, som arbetstagare under utvecklingssamtal och som potentiella partners på Tinder. Detta gäller också för barn i deras vardag. Bedömningar blir ett kvitto på en position i gruppen och i samhället i stort. Med hjälp av olika bedömningsverktyg positionerar vi inte bara oss själva och andra, utan vi blir också positionerade av förväntningar och normsystem. Ingen behöver påpeka att vi bör hålla oss i form, laga mat från grunden eller låta våra barn idrotta och konsumera teaterkultur hellre än att spela Fortnite. I detta självdisciplinerande samhälle kan vi alla se vårt värde i relation till samhälleliga ideal – men det kan också alla andra. Att utvärdera, bedöma och välja den bäst lämpade individen passar väl in i dagens idé om meritokrati. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Centrum för barnkulturforskning, 2019 Edition: 1
Series
Centrum för barnkulturs skriftserie ; 52
Keywords
urval, selektering, självreflektion, talangidentifikation
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5710 (URN)9789198232356 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-04-11 Created: 2019-04-11 Last updated: 2019-05-08Bibliographically approved
Kilger, M. (2019). From hard work to grit: On the discursive formation of talent. Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, 10(2), 29-50
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From hard work to grit: On the discursive formation of talent
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 29-50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article examines the long historical interest for the selection of young talented children in sports. This seemingly everlasting search for talents and the quest for the especially gifted is followed by the practice of trying to find and select the right individuals. This paper elucidates historical representations of talent and talent selection in a series of professional sports literature in Sweden during the 1930s, 1980s, 1990s and 2010s.

Drawing on a discourse analytic approach, it illustrates the historical understanding of selection and how such practices produce formations of legitimacy. The study shows how certain historical elements reoccur in contemporary selection discourse and how specific actions are transformed into personal characteristics. These selection processes construct a rationale for a legitimate selection and illustrate how talent selection is based on historically specific assumptions, normative and moral statements and activities connected to a specific discursive formation. This insight can underlines that talent selection cannot be understood as essential skills identified through observation, tests or interviews. It is rather to be understood as a discursive repertoire responding to a specific historical legitimacy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Malmö universitet, 2019
Keywords
talent; discursive formations; interpretative repertoires; Foucault; "tidskriften Svensk idrott"
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5709 (URN)
Available from: 2019-04-11 Created: 2019-04-11 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved
Kilger, M. & Blomberg, H. (2019). Governing Talent Selection through the Brain: Constructing Cognitive Executive Function as a Way of Predicting Sporting Success. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy, 1-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Governing Talent Selection through the Brain: Constructing Cognitive Executive Function as a Way of Predicting Sporting Success
2019 (English)In: Sport, Ethics and Philosophy, ISSN 1751-1321, E-ISSN 1751-133X, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

An increasingly central part of the scientific debate in sports has come to focus on how neuroscience can help to explain sports performance and development of expertise. In particular, the process of identifying young talents has been increasingly influencedby neuroscientific tests to identify future potential. It has been argued that instead of relying on coaches’ subjective assessments the process of selection should be based on general metrics of the brain through standardized testing. One key neurological functionhighlighted in the search for talent is cognitive executive functions. In the contemporary debate, studies of brain activity have suggested that children should undergo neuroscientific testing to determine the appropriate cognitive executive functions (CEF) for elite sports.This paper builds on previous work on the implications of a neuroscientific ontology in sports and Bruno Latour’s work onthe construction of scientific facts. Departing from discourse analysis,this paper studies the production and popularization of CEF as scientific facts. The findings illustrate how representations of brain activity are visualized and legitimized and how the out-of context tests are translated into facts about brain functions. The CEF test results are produced as inscriptions of undisputable facts, claiming that the results show prerequisites for sporting success.We argue that the mind-brain-behaviour relationship cannot be reduced to CEF tests and instead calls for a critical gaze on neuroscientific truth-claims and taken-for-granted facts in the area of sport.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
neuroscience; cognitive executive functions; talent identification; inscriptions; interpretative repertoires
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5781 (URN)10.1080/17511321.2019.1631880 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-06-22 Created: 2019-06-22 Last updated: 2019-08-14Bibliographically approved
Kilger, M. & Hellström, J. S. (2019). “- How does it feel right now?”: A narrative analysis of sports-interviews after performance. In: James Phelan (Ed.), The Society of the Study of Narrative Annual Conference, ISSN: . Paper presented at 2019 International Conference on Narrative, May 30-June 1, Pamplona, Spain. Georgetown: Ohio State University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“- How does it feel right now?”: A narrative analysis of sports-interviews after performance
2019 (English)In: The Society of the Study of Narrative Annual Conference, ISSN / [ed] James Phelan, Georgetown: Ohio State University Press, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Success stories and heroic tales are recurrently investigated narrative genres in literature (Propp, 1998), journalism (Lule, 2001) and, not the least, in sports (Hellström, 2014). In sports, we repeatedly hear athletes explain their performance at half-time or give us reflections on a recently completed competition. However, these stories are not produced in a social vacuum; they are part of a discursive framework and a product of time and place. The trajectories for a legitimate success story is limited and specific storylines are repeated and holds a specific dramaturgical structure. The heroic story typically follows a temporal structure, from a beginning to an end, where events and performances function as phases of a narrative journey towards a defining triumph (Hoebeke et al. 2011). Which performances that constitutes the highlight of an athlete’s career will always be culturally determined, since cultures produces heroes according to their own specific values and traditions (Whannel, 2002). Thereby, the “personal” story is both a contextually specific narrative and a culturally shared narrative.

 

Aims and empirical material

In this paper, we are seeking to investigate how success stories in sports as a central part of the athletes identity work, and how these stories also serve as symbols for values and morals of a wider sporting society (Kilger, 2017). Many narrative scholars within the area of sports have been interested in retrospective studies of sports heroes or historical media studies of successful athletes (Hargreaves, 2000; Hellström, 2014; Whannel, 2002). In this study, we would like to pay particular attention to how personal narratives are built ´in-action´ and study which narrative elements are recurrent in the interviews and how is the own performance explained. Accordingly, we are interested in how such narratives of success and failure are co-constructed in the interview interaction and how they are structured. By investigating which master narratives that the participants recruit in their personal stories, this can help us to uncover shared normative storylines in elite sports. Moreover, we would like to illuminate how the athletes are using ´temporal-identity´ in the interviews as a way to construct a legitimate story of performance.

 

The data set will include after-performance media interviews from Swedish television (SVT) during the FIS Cross Country World Championships. More specifically, we are seeking to analyze between 15-20 after-race television interviews with Swedish athletes during the FIS Cross Country World Championships 2019 in Falun, Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Georgetown: Ohio State University Press, 2019
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5911 (URN)
Conference
2019 International Conference on Narrative, May 30-June 1, Pamplona, Spain
Available from: 2019-11-12 Created: 2019-11-12 Last updated: 2019-11-18Bibliographically approved
Kilger, M. (2019). Talangurval och att prognostisera framtida potential. Ikaros: tidskrift om människan och vetenskapen, 15(1), 11-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Talangurval och att prognostisera framtida potential
2019 (Swedish)In: Ikaros: tidskrift om människan och vetenskapen, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 11-14Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [sv]

I de urvalsprocesser som bl.a. ungdomsidrottens präglas av betonas försöker man identifiera unga begåvningar. Men vad menar man egentligen med begreppet talang?  Vilken roll spelar begreppet i hur vi ser på urvalsprocesser och deras legitimitet? 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Åbo: Tidskriften Ikaros, 2019
Keywords
talang; barn och ungdomsidrott; urval; potential
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5752 (URN)
Available from: 2019-05-21 Created: 2019-05-21 Last updated: 2019-05-28Bibliographically approved
Kilger, M. (2018). Book Review: When Women Rule the Court: Gender, Race, and Japanese American Basketball by Nicole Willms [Review]. Gender & Society, 32(5), 755-757
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Book Review: When Women Rule the Court: Gender, Race, and Japanese American Basketball by Nicole Willms
2018 (English)In: Gender & Society, ISSN 0891-2432, E-ISSN 1552-3977, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 755-757Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5492 (URN)10.1177/0891243218771299 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-12-10 Created: 2018-12-10 Last updated: 2018-12-10Bibliographically approved
Kilger, M. (2017). Kaxigt och ödmjukt i unga talangers framgångsberättelser. Idrottsforskning.se, Article ID 13 juni.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kaxigt och ödmjukt i unga talangers framgångsberättelser
2017 (Swedish)In: Idrottsforskning.se, article id 13 juniArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Centrum för idrottsforskning, CIF, 2017
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5582 (URN)
Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-01-24 Last updated: 2019-01-24Bibliographically approved
Kilger, M. & Jonsson, R. (2017). Talent Production in Interaction: Performance Appraisal Interviews in Talent Selection Camps. Communication & Sport, 5(1), 110-129
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Talent Production in Interaction: Performance Appraisal Interviews in Talent Selection Camps
2017 (English)In: Communication & Sport, ISSN 2167-4795, E-ISSN 2167-4809, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 110-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In sports, there is an extensive interest in identifying and selecting talented children in order to develop elite adult athletes. The process of selecting and screening talents involves not only physical and technical skills but also efforts to find adequate personality traits. Therefore, different types of performance appraisal interviews (PAIs) are becoming increasingly common within the field. Departing from fieldwork in two selection camps for Swedish youth national teams in soccer and hockey, we will take a closer look at the PAIs employed during these camps. This article takes on a narrative approach, emphasizing PAI as a narrative genre and a framework for a specific form of interaction. Our findings show how eligibility is performed in interaction through following three practices: (i) showcasing gratitude without tipping into flattery, (ii) using temporality as a way of displaying developmental potential, and (iii) adopting the role of the self-reflecting subject. This genre of interviews not only produces certain practices but also preferred subject positions and narratives. The PAI is thus a narrative genre where the players are encouraged to perform talent in order to appear selectable.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
talent selection; performance appraisal interviews; narrative analysis; small stories; positioning
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5415 (URN)10.1177/2167479515591789 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-09-11 Created: 2018-09-11 Last updated: 2018-09-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8684-3724

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