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Nooijen, C. F., Blom, V., Ekblom, Ö., Ekblom, M. & Kallings, L. (2019). Improving office workers' mental health and cognition: a 3-arm cluster randomized controlled trial targeting physical activity and sedentary behavior in multi-component interventions. BMC Public Health, 19, Article ID 266.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improving office workers' mental health and cognition: a 3-arm cluster randomized controlled trial targeting physical activity and sedentary behavior in multi-component interventions
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2019 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, article id 266Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Physically inactive and sedentary lifestyles are negatively related to both mental health and cognition. For office-workers, who spend two-thirds of their workday sitting, it is important to improve these lifestyles. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of multi-component interventions, incorporating individual, environmental and organizational changes, to increase physical activity or reduce sedentary behavior among office-workers in order to improve mental health and cognition.

Methods

a 3-arm, clustered randomized controlled trial (RCT) with waiting list control group amongst adult office-workers of two large Swedish companies. Cluster teams will be randomized into 6-month interventions or to a passive waiting list control group which will receive the allocated intervention with a 6-month delay. Two multicomponent interventions will be studied of which one focuses on improving physical activity and the other on reducing sedentary behavior. Both interventions include 5 sessions of motivational counselling. In the physical activity intervention persons also get access to a gym and team leaders will organize lunch walks and encourage to exercise. In the sedentary behavior intervention standing- and walking meetings will be implemented and team leaders will encourage to reduce sitting. The recruitment target is 110 office-workers per arm (330 in total). Measurements will be repeated every 6months for a total intended duration of 24months. Proximal main outcomes are physical activity measured with accelerometers and sedentary behavior with inclinometers. Distal outcomes are self-reported mental health and a cognition test battery. Additional outcomes will include cardiovascular fitness, body composition, sleep, self-reported physical activity and sedentary behavior, other health habits, physical health, and working mechanisms from blood samples and questionnaires.

Discussion

This cluster RCT will contribute to the currently available evidence by comparing the effectiveness of multi-component interventions targeting physical activity or sedentary behavior with the end goal of improving mental health and cognition. This study is strong in its cluster randomized design, numerous objective outcome measures and long-term follow-up. The exact content of the interventions has been defined by combining theory with results from a larger research project as well as having a continuous dialogue with the involved companies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5646 (URN)10.1186/s12889-019-6589-4 (DOI)000460405200003 ()30836957 (PubMedID)
Projects
Fysisk aktivitet och hälsosamma hjärnfunktioner bland kontorsarbetare: Delprojekt 3, Långsiktiga interventioner
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-08-06
Persson, Å., Möller, J., Engström, K., Sundström, M. L. & Nooijen, C. F. (2019). Is moving to a greener or less green area followed by changes in physical activity?. Health and Place, 57, 165-170
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is moving to a greener or less green area followed by changes in physical activity?
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2019 (English)In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 57, p. 165-170Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Green areas might provide an inviting setting and thereby promote physical activity. The objective of this study was to determine whether moving to different green area surroundings was followed by changes of physical activity. Data from a large population-based cohort of adults in Stockholm County responding to surveys in 2010 and 2014 were analysed (n = 42611). Information about walking/cycling and exercise were self-reported and living area greenness data were satellite-derived (NDVI, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index). Multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed separately for changes in levels of walking/cycling and exercise (decrease, stable, increase). Greenness was defined as a change in NDVI quartile to less green, same, or greener. Odds ratio's (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were presented adjusted for gender, age, education and area-based income. Contrary to what we hypothesized, those moving to a greener area were more likely to decrease their levels of walking/cycling (OR = 1.42, CI = 1.28–1.58), whereas those moving to a less green area were more likely to increase their walking/cycling (OR = 1.26, CI = 1.13–1.41). Exercise behaviour showed another pattern, with people being more likely to decrease exercise both when moving to a greener (OR = 1.25, CI = 1.22–1.38) and to a less green area (OR = 1.22, CI = 1.09–1.36). Studying subpopulations based on sociodemographic characteristics did not aid to clarify our results. This cohort study with repeated measurements did not support the currently available cross-sectional studies showing a strong positive relation between greenness and physical activity. Nevertheless, our findings have shown spatial patterns related to green areas and physical activity which imply a need for place-specific health policies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Greenness, Urban planning, Physical activity, Exercise
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5734 (URN)10.1016/j.healthplace.2019.04.006 (DOI)000471889900020 ()
Available from: 2019-05-07 Created: 2019-05-07 Last updated: 2019-08-14Bibliographically approved
Nooijen, C. F., Kallings, L., Blom, V., Ekblom, Ö., Forsell, Y. & Ekblom, M. (2018). Common Perceived Barriers and Facilitators for Reducing Sedentary Behaviour among Office Workers.. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15(4), Article ID E792.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Common Perceived Barriers and Facilitators for Reducing Sedentary Behaviour among Office Workers.
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 15, no 4, article id E792Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Qualitative studies identified barriers and facilitators associated with work-related sedentary behaviour. The objective of this study was to determine common perceived barriers and facilitators among office workers, assess subgroup differences, and describe sedentary behaviour. From two Swedish companies, 547 office workers (41 years (IQR = 35–48), 65% women, 66% highly educated) completed questionnaires on perceived barriers and facilitators, for which subgroup differences in age, gender, education, and workplace sedentary behaviour were assessed. Sedentary behaviour was measured using inclinometers (n = 311). The most frequently reported barrier was sitting is a habit (67%), which was reported more among women than men (X2 = 5.14, p = 0.03) and more among highly sedentary office workers (X2 = 9.26, p < 0.01). The two other most reported barriers were that standing is uncomfortable (29%) and standing is tiring (24%). Facilitators with the most support were the introduction of either standing- or walking-meetings (respectively 33% and 29%) and more possibilities or reminders for breaks (31%). The proportion spent sedentary was 64% at the workplace, 61% on working days, and 57% on non-working days. This study provides a detailed understanding of office workers’ ideas about sitting and means to reduce sitting. We advise to include the supported facilitators and individualized support in interventions to work towards more effective strategies to reduce sedentary behaviour.

Keywords
barriers, facilitators, office workers, sedentary behaviour, workplace
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5262 (URN)10.3390/ijerph15040792 (DOI)000434868800231 ()29670047 (PubMedID)
Projects
Fysisk aktivitet och hälsosamma hjärnfunktioner bland kontorsarbetare: Delprojekt 1, Tvärsnittsstudie
Available from: 2018-05-25 Created: 2018-05-25 Last updated: 2019-08-06
Nooijen, C. F., Kallings, L., Blom, V., Ekblom, Ö., Forsell, Y. & Ekblom, M. (2018). Common perceived barriers and facilitators for reducing sedentary behaviour among office-workers. In: Journal of Physical Activity & Health, Volume 15, Issue 10, Pages S94-S95 Supplement 1: . Paper presented at 7th International Society for Physical Activity and Health Congress, London, England, October 15 to October 17, 2018 (pp. S94-S95). Canadian Consortium on Human Security, 15(10)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Common perceived barriers and facilitators for reducing sedentary behaviour among office-workers
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Physical Activity & Health, Volume 15, Issue 10, Pages S94-S95 Supplement 1, Canadian Consortium on Human Security, 2018, Vol. 15, no 10, p. S94-S95Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Canadian Consortium on Human Security, 2018
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5513 (URN)000446516100316 ()
Conference
7th International Society for Physical Activity and Health Congress, London, England, October 15 to October 17, 2018
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2018-12-21Bibliographically approved
Kouwijzer, I., Nooijen, C. F., Van Breukelen, K., Janssen, T. W. J. & De Groot, S. (2018). EFFECTS OF PUSH-OFF ABILITY AND HANDCYCLE TYPE ON HANDCYCLING PERFORMANCE IN ABLE-BODIED PARTICIPANTS. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, 50(6), 563-568
Open this publication in new window or tab >>EFFECTS OF PUSH-OFF ABILITY AND HANDCYCLE TYPE ON HANDCYCLING PERFORMANCE IN ABLE-BODIED PARTICIPANTS
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 563-568Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To assess the effects on handcycling performance and physiological responses, of: (i) making a closed chain by comparing handcycling in a recumbent bike with 2-feet footrest (closed chain) with handcycling with 1 footrest (partial closed chain) and without a footrest (no closed chain); (ii) equipment by comparing handcycling in a recumbent bike with a kneeling bike. Methods: Ten able-bodied participants performed submaximal exercise and sprint tests, once in a kneeling bike and 3 times on a recumbent: 2-feet support, 1-foot support and without foot support. Physical strain (submaximal oxygen uptake and heart rate), peak (POpeak) and mean power output (POmean) were measured. Results: Significantly higher POpeak, and POmean were found with 2-feet support (mean 415 W (standard deviation (SD) 163) and mean 281 W (SD 96)) and higher POmean with 1-foot support (mean 279 W (SD 104)) compared with no foot support (mean 332 W (SD 127) and mean 254 W (SD 101)), p<0.05. No differences were found for physical strain. In the kneeling bike, POpeak and POmean were significantly higher (mean 628 W (SD 231) and 391 W (SD 121)) than in the recumbent (mean 415 W (SD 163) and 281 W (SD 96)), p=0.001. Conclusion: The ability to make a closed chain has a significant positive effect on handcycling sprint performance; therefore, this ability may be a discriminating factor. Sprint performance was significantly higher in kneeling compared with recumbent handcycling.

Keywords
(sub)maximal exercise, physical strain, power output, able-bodied, handbike
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5374 (URN)10.2340/16501977-2343 (DOI)29756632 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-17 Created: 2018-08-17 Last updated: 2018-08-17
Ekblom, M., Blom, V., Ekblom, Ö., Kallings, L. & Nooijen, C. F. (2018). Fysisk aktivitet och hjärnhälsa. Fysioterapi (5), 32-35
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fysisk aktivitet och hjärnhälsa
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2018 (Swedish)In: Fysioterapi, ISSN 1653-5804, no 5, p. 32-35Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [sv]

Psykisk ohälsa är den vanligaste orsaken till sjukskrivning. Fysisk aktivitet kan förebygga många former av ohälsa, men vilka fysiska aktivitetsmönster som gynnar psykisk hälsa och kognitiva förmågor är fortfarande okänt. Denna typ av forskning är komplex och kräver samarbete med många olika aktörer i samhället.

National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5452 (URN)
Available from: 2018-10-18 Created: 2018-10-18 Last updated: 2018-11-22Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0146-9292

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