Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH

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Publications (10 of 20) Show all publications
LaBerge, N. B., Detterbeck, A. & Nooijen, C. F. (2023). Comorbidities and medical complexities of mobility device users: a retrospective study.. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 18(7), 1035-1042
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comorbidities and medical complexities of mobility device users: a retrospective study.
2023 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 1035-1042Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To determine the medical complexities and comorbidities of individuals who utilise wheeled mobility devices. As well as, to examine costly events including the number of urinary tract infections (UTIs), hospitalizations, urgent care(UC)/emergency department (ED) visits that are commonly seen in this population over a period of time one year prior to and one year post receiving their wheeled mobility equipment.

DESIGN/SETTING: A retrospective data review of 857 individual medical charts at a Level 1 Trauma Hospital and Clinic System.

PARTICIPANTS: 330 male and female (24-92 years old) mobility device users with a wide range of diagnoses, of which: 56 used manual wheelchairs (MWC),138 scooters (POV), 123 power wheelchairs without integrated standing (PWC), and 13 power wheelchairs with integrated standing (iS-PWC).

RESULTS: Overall, 92% (n = 304) had at least three medical comorbidities and medical complexities. The most common comorbidity was pain (91%). A change was noted in a lower incidence of UTIs in those using an iS-PWC, respectively 23% with at least 1 UTI in the year prior to and 8% in the year after the mobility device evaluation.

CONCLUSIONS: The large number of comorbidities and medical complexities amongst all mobility device users is concerning. The burden and the accompanying healthcare costs of this population is high. The potential that iS-PWC and other interventions could have on reducing these issues should be explored further.Implications of rehabilitationRegardless of a person's primary diagnosis or the wheeled mobility device they use, 100% have at least one and 92% have at least three comorbidities and medical complexities if they spend the majority of their day sittingThe high healthcare cost situations such as Emergency Department visits, Urgent Care visits, hospitalizations, and Urinary Tract Infections are present across those that use all mobility device types and the means to potentially reduce these incidences should be further exploredThe introduction of integrated standing within a power wheelchair, as a means to minimize the frequency of comorbidities and medical complications, should also be investigated further.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Sitting position, comorbidity, disabled persons, hospitalization, mobility limitation, standing position, urinary tract infections, wheelchairs
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6788 (URN)10.1080/17483107.2021.1969453 (DOI)000692342300001 ()34472994 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-09-16 Created: 2021-09-16 Last updated: 2024-01-11Bibliographically approved
Liljedahl, J., Arndt, A., Nooijen, C. F. & Bjerkefors, A. (2023). Isometric, dynamic, and manual muscle strength measures and their association with cycling performance in elite para-cyclists.. American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, 102(5), 461-467
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Isometric, dynamic, and manual muscle strength measures and their association with cycling performance in elite para-cyclists.
2023 (English)In: American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, ISSN 0894-9115, E-ISSN 1537-7385, Vol. 102, no 5, p. 461-467Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Para-cycling classification aims to generate fair competition by discriminating between levels of activity limitation. This study investigated the relationship between lower limb Manual Muscle Tests (MMT) with ratio-scaled measures of isometric and dynamic strength, and of the ratio-scaled measures with cycling performance.

DESIGN: Fifty-six para-cyclists (44 males, 12 females) with leg impairments performed isometric and dynamic strength tests: leg push and pull, and an all-out 20 s sprint. MMT results were obtained from the classification database (n = 21) and race speeds from time trials (n = 54).

RESULTS: Regression analyses showed significant associations of MMT with isometric push (R2 = .49), dynamic push (R2 = .35), and dynamic pull (R2 = .28). Isometric strength was significantly correlated with dynamic push (ρ = .63) and pull (ρ = .54). The isometric and dynamic tests were significantly associated with sprint power and race speed (R2 = .16-.50).

CONCLUSION: The modified MMT and ratio-scaled measures were significantly associated. The significant relation of isometric and dynamic strength with sprint power and race speed maps the impact of lower limb impairments on para-cycling performance. MMT and the isometric and dynamic measures show potential for use in para-cycling classification.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2023
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7024 (URN)10.1097/PHM.0000000000002014 (DOI)000985327400017 ()35349541 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-04-22 Created: 2022-04-22 Last updated: 2023-06-27Bibliographically approved
Muchaxo, R. E. A., Kouwijzer, I., van der Woude, L. H. V., Janssen, T. W. J., Nooijen, C. F. & de Groot, S. (2023). The impact of lower-limb function on upper-limb pull and push strength in elite handcycling athletes. Sports Biomechanics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of lower-limb function on upper-limb pull and push strength in elite handcycling athletes
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2023 (English)In: Sports Biomechanics, ISSN 1476-3141, E-ISSN 1752-6116Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study investigated the impact of performing a closed kinetic chain with the lower limbs on isometric upper-limb pull and push strength. Sixty-two elite handcyclists were assessed with the Manual Muscle Test and allocated to groups with partial to normal (LLF) or no lower-limb (no-LLF) function. Both groups performed upper-limb strength measurements under two kinetic-chain conditions. During the closed-chain condition, the lower limbs were attached to two footrests, providing horizontal and vertical support. During the open-chain condition, the footrests were removed and the limbs were supported vertically by a horizontal plate. Repeated-measures ANOVA were conducted to investigate main effects (open vs. closed chain, LLF vs. no-LLF) and their interaction. During pull, LLF performed better (p < 0.001, +11%) by pushing against the footrests. However, this increase in pulling strength during a closed-chain condition was not observed in the no-LLF. Therefore, findings suggest an advantage for the least impaired athletes by being able to perform lower-limb closed chains during pulling. Handcyclists with LLF can maximise pulling performance by adjusting the footrests. The classification system should consider the implications of these findings on the allocation of athletes with different levels of LLF and/or on the equipment regulation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Upper-limb force, kinetic chain, paralympic classification, para-athletes, para-cycling, >
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7951 (URN)10.1080/14763141.2023.2242323 (DOI)001093290400001 ()37592738 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-11-20 Created: 2023-11-20 Last updated: 2023-11-20
Muchaxo, R. E., De Groot, S., Kouwijzer, I., Van der Woude, L. H., Nooijen, C. F. & Janssen, T. W. (2022). Association between upper-limb isometric strength and handcycling performance in elite athletes. Sports Biomechanics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between upper-limb isometric strength and handcycling performance in elite athletes
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2022 (English)In: Sports Biomechanics, ISSN 1476-3141, E-ISSN 1752-6116Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study investigated the association among isometric upper-limb strength of handcyclists and sport-specific performance outcomes. At two international events, 62 athletes were tested on upper-limb strength, measured with an isometric-strength setup and with Manual Muscle Test (MMT). Horizontal force (F-z), effectiveness, rate of development, variability, and asymmetries were calculated for upper-limb pull and push. Performance measures were mean (POmean) and peak (POpeak) 20-s sprint power output and average time-trial velocity (TTvelocity). Regression models were conducted to investigate which pull and push strength variables associated strongest with performance measures. Additional regression analyses were conducted with an MMT sum score as predictor. Push and pull F-z showed the strongest associations with all outcomes. Combined push and pull F-z explained (p < .001) 80-81% of variance of POmean and POpeak. For TTvelocity, only push F-z was included in the model explaining 29% of the variance (p < .001). MMT models revealed weaker associations with sprint PO (R-2 = .38-.40, p < .001) and TTvelocity (R-2 = .18, p = 0.001). The findings confirmed the relevance of upper-limb strength on handcycling performance and the significance of ratio-scaled strength measures. Isometric strength outcomes are adequate sport-specific indicators of impairment in handcycling classification, but future research should corroborate this notion and its potential to discriminate between sports classes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
Arm strength, time-trial, sprint, para-cycling, paralympic classification
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology; Medicine/Technology; Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7125 (URN)10.1080/14763141.2022.2071760 (DOI)000813642300001 ()35723238 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-09-13 Created: 2022-09-13 Last updated: 2022-09-13
Borg, D. N., Osborne, J. O., Tweedy, S. M., Liljedahl, J. & Nooijen, C. F. (2022). Bicycling and tricycling road race performance in international para-cycling events between 2011 and 2019.. American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, 101(4), 384-388
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bicycling and tricycling road race performance in international para-cycling events between 2011 and 2019.
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2022 (English)In: American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, ISSN 0894-9115, E-ISSN 1537-7385, Vol. 101, no 4, p. 384-388Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ABSTRACT: This study described bicycling (C-classes) and tricycling (T-classes) performance in International Cycling Federation road race events between 2011 and 2019. A total of 3,243 race results from 33 events were analyzed. Race velocity was calculated for each result. Bicycling and tricycling data were separately modelled using a linear mixed-effects model. Bicycling velocity was statistically different between all adjacent men's classes (Cohen's d = 0.14 to 0.73), and between the women's C1 and C2 (d = 1.15), and C3 and C4 (d = 0.48) classes. The absence of statistical differences between some women's bicycling classes may be due to a limited number of observations in these classifications. As expected, velocity was statistically different between men's (d = 1.64) and women's (d = 1.38) T1 and T2 classes. Road race performance was hierarchical within the disciplines of bicycling and tricycling, although not all adjacent women's bicycling classes were statistically different. The existence of a performance hierarchy does not necessarily validate the classification system. The integration of information regarding athlete impairment type and severity, with performance data, would provide greater insight into the validity of the classification system, and should be prioritized as an area of future research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2022
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6736 (URN)10.1097/PHM.0000000000001819 (DOI)000770374700018 ()34121066 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-06-23 Created: 2021-06-23 Last updated: 2022-04-26Bibliographically approved
Wang, R., Blom, V., Nooijen, C. F., Kallings, L., Ekblom, Ö. & Ekblom, M. M. (2022). The Role of Executive Function in the Effectiveness of Multi-Component Interventions Targeting Physical Activity Behavior in Office Workers. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19(1), 266-266
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of Executive Function in the Effectiveness of Multi-Component Interventions Targeting Physical Activity Behavior in Office Workers
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2022 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 266-266Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A knowledge gap remains in understanding how to improve the intervention effectiveness in office workers targeting physically active (PA) behavior. We aim to identify the modifying effect of executive function (EF) on the intervention effectiveness targeting PA-behaviors, and to verify whether the observed effect varies by Job Demand Control (JDC) categories. This workplace-based intervention study included 245 participants who were randomized into a control group and two intervention arms—promoting physical activity (iPA) group or reducing sedentary behavior (iSED) group. The interventions were conducted through counselling-based cognitive behavioral therapy and team activities over 6 months. PA-behaviors were measured by an accelerometer. EF was assessed by the Trail Making Test-B, Stroop, and n-back test. The JDC categories were measured by the demand control questionnaire. Higher EF level at baseline was significantly associated with the intervention effect on increased sleep time (β-coefficient: 3.33, p = 0.003) and decreased sedentary time (−2.76, p = 0.049) in the iSED-group. Participants with active jobs (high job demands, high control) presented significantly increased light-intensity PA in the iSED-group in comparison to the control group. Among participants with a high level of EF and active jobs, relative to the control group, the iPA-group showed a substantial increase in light-intensity PA (1.58, p = 0.036) and the iSED-group showed a tendency of reducing sedentary behavior (−5.35, p = 0.054). The findings suggest that office workers with a high EF and active jobs may benefit most from an intervention study targeting PA-behaviors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
physical activity, sedentary behavior, executive function, job control, job demands, active jobs, self-regulation, health promotion
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6896 (URN)10.3390/ijerph19010266 (DOI)000751331000001 ()35010526 (PubMedID)
Projects
Fysisk aktivitet och hälsosamma hjärnfunktioner bland kontorsarbetare: Delprojekt 3, Långsiktiga interventioner
Available from: 2022-01-04 Created: 2022-01-04 Last updated: 2024-02-27
Muchaxo, R., De Groot, S., Kouwijzer, I., Van Der Woude, L., Janssen, T. & Nooijen, C. F. (2021). A Role for Trunk Function in Elite Recumbent Handcycling Performance?. Journal of Sports Sciences, 39(20), 2312-2321
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Role for Trunk Function in Elite Recumbent Handcycling Performance?
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2021 (English)In: Journal of Sports Sciences, ISSN 0264-0414, E-ISSN 1466-447X, Vol. 39, no 20, p. 2312-2321Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Handcycling classification considers trunk function, but there is limited scientific evidence of trunk involvement in recumbent performance. This study investigated the association between trunk function and recumbent handcycling performance of athletes without upper-limb impairments (H3-H4 sport classes). The study was divided into two parts. First, 528 time-trial results from 81 handcyclists with spinal cord injury (SCI) were obtained between 2014 and 2020. Average time-trial velocity was used as performance measure and SCI level as trunk function determinant. Multilevel regression analysis was performed to analyse differences in performance among SCI groups while correcting for lesion completeness, sex, and age. Second, in 26 handcyclists, standardised trunk flexion strength was measured with a handheld dynamometer. Peak and mean power-output from a sprint test and time-trial average velocity were used as performance measures. Spearman correlations were conducted to investigate the association between trunk strength and performance. Results showed that the different SCI groups did not exhibit significant differences in performance. Furthermore, trunk flexion strength and performance exhibited non-significant weak to moderate correlations (for time-trial speed: rs = 0.36; p = 0.07). Results of both analyses suggest that trunk flexion strength does not seem to significantly impact recumbent handcycling performance in athletes without upper-limb impairments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2021
Keywords
Para-cycling, paralympic classification, trunk strength, average velocity, time trial, sprint test
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6737 (URN)10.1080/02640414.2021.1930684 (DOI)000657528000001 ()34078241 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-06-28 Created: 2021-06-28 Last updated: 2022-01-18
Larisch, L.-M., Bojsen-Møller, E., Nooijen, C. F., Blom, V., Ekblom, M., Ekblom, Ö., . . . Kallings, L. (2021). Effects of Two Randomized and Controlled Multi-Component Interventions Focusing On 24-Hour Movement Behavior among Office Workers: A Compositional Data Analysis.. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18(8), Article ID 4191.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Two Randomized and Controlled Multi-Component Interventions Focusing On 24-Hour Movement Behavior among Office Workers: A Compositional Data Analysis.
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2021 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 8, article id 4191Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Intervention studies aiming at changing movement behavior have usually not accounted for the compositional nature of time-use data. Compositional data analysis (CoDA) has been suggested as a useful strategy for analyzing such data. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of two multi-component interventions on 24-h movement behavior (using CoDA) and on cardiorespiratory fitness among office workers; one focusing on reducing sedentariness and the other on increasing physical activity. Office workers (n = 263) were cluster randomized into one of two 6-month intervention groups, or a control group. Time spent in sedentary behavior, light-intensity, moderate and vigorous physical activity, and time in bed were assessed using accelerometers and diaries, both for 24 h in total, and for work and leisure time separately. Cardiorespiratory fitness was estimated using a sub-maximal cycle ergometer test. Intervention effects were analyzed using linear mixed models. No intervention effects were found, either for 24-h behaviors in total, or for work and leisure time behaviors separately. Cardiorespiratory fitness did not change significantly. Despite a thorough analysis of 24-h behaviors using CoDA, no intervention effects were found, neither for behaviors in total, nor for work and leisure time behaviors separately. Cardiorespiratory fitness did not change significantly. Although the design of the multi-component interventions was based on theoretical frameworks, and included cognitive behavioral therapy counselling, which has been proven effective in other populations, issues related to implementation of and compliance with some intervention components may have led to the observed lack of intervention effect.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2021
Keywords
24-h movement behavior, cognitive behavioral therapy, compositional data analysis, office workers, physical activity, sedentary behavior
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6700 (URN)10.3390/ijerph18084191 (DOI)000644167900001 ()33920971 (PubMedID)
Projects
Fysisk aktivitet och hälsosamma hjärnfunktioner bland kontorsarbetare: Delprojekt 3, Långsiktiga interventioner
Available from: 2021-05-24 Created: 2021-05-24 Last updated: 2024-02-27
Liljedahl, J. B., Bjerkefors, A., Arndt, A. & Nooijen, C. F. (2021). Para-cycling race performance in different sport classes.. Disability and Rehabilitation, 43(24), 3440-3444
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Para-cycling race performance in different sport classes.
2021 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 43, no 24, p. 3440-3444Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The para-cycling classification system, consisting of five classes (C1-C5) for bicycling (C5 athletes having least impairments), is mostly based on expert-opinion rather than scientific evidence. The aim of this study was to determine the differences in race performance between para-cycling classes. Methods: From official results of the men's 1 km time trials for classes C1-C5 of seven Union Cycliste Internationale World Championships and Paralympics, median race speed of the five fastest athletes in each class was calculated (n = 175). Para-cycling results were expressed as a percentage of able-bodied performance using race results from the same years (n = 35). To assess differences between consecutive classes, Kruskal-Wallis tests with Mann-Whitney U post hoc tests were performed, correcting for multiple testing (p < 0.013). Results: Para-cyclists in C1 reached 75% (median ± interquartile range = 44.8 ± 4.2 km/h) and in C5 90% (53.5 ± 2.9 km/h) of able-bodied race speed (59.4 ± 0.9 km/h). Median race speed between consecutive classes was significantly different (χ2 = 142.6, p < 0.01), except for C4 (52.1 ± 2.8 km/h) and C5 (U = 447.0, p = 0.05). Conclusion: Current para-cycling classification does not clearly differentiate between classes with least impairments.IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATIONThe current classification system is not evidence-based and does not clearly differentiate between relevant groups of para-cyclists.An evidence-based para-cycling classification system is essential for a fair and equitable competition.Fair competition will make it more interesting and increase participation.Para-cycling can inspire everyone with and even those without disabilities to be physically active.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2021
Keywords
Para-cycling, classification, cycling, paralympic sports, performance
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6095 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2020.1734106 (DOI)000519734900001 ()32174176 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-03-24 Created: 2020-03-24 Last updated: 2022-05-10
Blom, V., Drake, E., Kallings, L., Ekblom, M. & Nooijen, C. F. (2021). The effects on self-efficacy, motivation and perceived barriers of an intervention targeting physical activity and sedentary behaviours in office workers: a cluster randomized control trial.. BMC Public Health, 21(1), Article ID 1048.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects on self-efficacy, motivation and perceived barriers of an intervention targeting physical activity and sedentary behaviours in office workers: a cluster randomized control trial.
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2021 (English)In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 1048Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The importance of physical activity on health is clear, but changing behaviour is difficult. Successful interventions aiming to improve physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviour is therefore of importance. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects on motivation, self-efficacy and barriers to change behaviour from two different behavioural intervention focusing either on reducing sedentary behaviour or on increasing physical activity as compared to a waiting list control group.

METHODS: The study was designed as a cluster randomized control trial (RCT) within two private companies. Self-efficacy, motivation and perceived barriers were together with demographic variables assessed before and after a 6-month intervention. Participant cluster teams were randomly allocated to either the physical activity intervention (iPA), the sedentary behaviour intervention (iSED), or control group. The intervention was multi componential and included motivational counselling based on Cognitive behaviour therapy and Motivational interviewing, group activities and management involvement. Group differences were determined using Bayesian multilevel modelling (parameter estimate; credible interval (CI)), analysing complete cases and those who adhered to the protocol by adhering to at least 3 out of 5 intervention sessions.

RESULTS: After the intervention, the complete cases analysis showed that the iPA group had significantly higher autonomous motivation (0.33, CI: 0.05-0.61) and controlled motivation (0.27, CI: 0.04-0.51) for physical activity compared with the control group. The iSED group scored less autonomous and controlled motivation compared to the iPA group (0.38, CI: - 0.69- -0.087 respectively - 0.32, CI: - 0.57-0.07) but no significant differences compared with the control group. Among individuals that adhered to the protocol, the results showed higher scores on Exercise (3.03, CI: 0.28-6.02) and Sedentary self-efficacy (3.59, CI: 0.35-7.15) for individuals in the iPA group and on Sedentary self-efficacy (4.77, CI: 0.59-9.44) for the iSED group compared to the control group.

CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that the interventions were successful in increasing self-efficacy in each intervention group and autonomous motivation for exercise in the iPA group, in particular when actively participating in the motivational counselling sessions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2021
Keywords
Motivation, Office-workers, Physical activity, Randomized intervention, Sedentary behaviour, Self-efficacy
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6725 (URN)10.1186/s12889-021-11083-2 (DOI)000762322600015 ()34078342 (PubMedID)
Projects
Fysisk aktivitet och hälsosamma hjärnfunktioner bland kontorsarbetare: Delprojekt 3, Långsiktiga interventioner
Available from: 2021-06-04 Created: 2021-06-04 Last updated: 2024-02-27
Projects
Physical activity and healthy brain functions in office workers [KK 20160040]; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH; Publications
Larisch, L.-M., Blom, V., Hagströmer, M., Ekblom, M., Ekblom, Ö., Nilsson, J. & Kallings, L. (2024). Improving movement behavior in office workers: effects of two multi-level cluster-RCT interventions on mental health. BMC Public Health, 24(1), Article ID 127. Larisch, L.-M., Kallings, L., Thedin Jakobsson, B. & Blom, V. (2023). “It depends on the boss”: A qualitative study of multi-level interventions aiming at office workers’ movement behavior and mental health. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 18(1), Article ID 2258564. Larisch, L.-M. (2023). Movement behavior and mental health in office workers: Associations and intervention effects. (Doctoral dissertation). Stockholm: Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIHEkblom, M., Bojsen-Møller, E., Blom, V., Tarassova, O., Moberg, M., Pontén, M., . . . Ekblom, Ö. (2022). Acute effects of physical activity patterns on plasma cortisol and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in relation to corticospinal excitability.. Behavioural Brain Research, 430, Article ID 113926. Larisch, L.-M., Blom, V., Kallings, L. & Thedin Jakobsson, B. (2022). Changing movement behavior for improving mental health among office workers: A qualitative study on acceptability, feasibility and fidelity of two RCT interventions. In: : . Paper presented at International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA), Phoenix, May 18-21, 2022. Larisch, L.-M., Blom, V. & Kallings, L. (2022). Effectiveness of two randomized and controlled multi-component interventions on 24-h movement behavior and mental health outcomes among office workers. In: : . Paper presented at International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA), Phoenix, Arizona, USA, May 18-21. Bojsen-Møller, E. (2022). Movement Behaviors and Cognitive Health for Office Workers. (Doctoral dissertation). Stockholm: Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIHBojsen-Møller, E., Wang, R., Nilsson, J., Heiland, E. G., Boraxbekk, C.-J., Kallings, L. & Ekblom, M. (2022). The effect of two multi-component behavior change interventions on cognitive functions.. BMC Public Health, 22(1), Article ID 1082. Wang, R., Ekblom, M., Arvidsson, D., Fridolfsson, J., Börjesson, M. & Ekblom, Ö. (2022). The interrelationship between physical activity intensity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and executive function in middle-aged adults: An observational study of office workers.. Frontiers In Public Health, 10, Article ID 1035521. Wang, R., Blom, V., Nooijen, C. F., Kallings, L., Ekblom, Ö. & Ekblom, M. M. (2022). The Role of Executive Function in the Effectiveness of Multi-Component Interventions Targeting Physical Activity Behavior in Office Workers. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19(1), 266-266
Organisations
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0146-9292

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