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Hamrin, K., Rosdahl, H., Ungerstedt, U. & Henriksson, J. (2002). Microdialysis in human skeletal muscle: effects of adding a colloid to the perfusate.. Journal of applied physiology, 92(1), 385-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microdialysis in human skeletal muscle: effects of adding a colloid to the perfusate.
2002 (English)In: Journal of applied physiology, ISSN 8750-7587, E-ISSN 1522-1601, Vol. 92, no 1, p. 385-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Microdialysis catheters (CMA-60 with a polyamide dialysis membrane; 20,000-molecular wt cutoff) were either immersed in an external medium or were inserted in the quadriceps femoris muscle of healthy subjects, using perfusate with or without dextran 70. Varying the position of the outflow tubing induced changes in hydrostatic pressure. The sample volumes were significantly smaller in catheters perfused without a colloid compared with those perfused with a colloid [11-50% (in vitro) and 8-59% (in vivo) lower than in colloid-perfused catheters with the same position of the outflow tubing]. The sample volumes were also significantly smaller when the dialysis membrane was influenced by maximal hydrostatic pressure (above position) compared with minimal hydrostatic pressure (below position) [7-38% (in vitro) and 3-46% (in vivo) lower than in catheters in the below position with the same perfusion fluid]. In vivo, glucose concentration at a perfusion flow rate of 0.33 microl/min was higher when the catheters were perfused without a colloid [18-28% higher than in colloid-perfused catheters with the same position of the outflow tubing (P < 0.001)] than with a colloid. A corresponding difference also tended to occur with lactate, glycerol, and urea. At 0.16 microl/min, the glucose concentration was the same irrespective of whether fluid loss had been counteracted by colloid inclusion or by lowering of outlet tubing. The mechanism behind the observed concentration difference is thought to be a higher effective perfusion flow rate when fluid loss is prevented at low-perfusion flows. This study shows that fluid imbalances can have important implications for microdialysis results at low-perfusion flow rates.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-1062 (URN)11744681 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-01-07 Created: 2010-01-07 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Rosdahl, H., Hamrin, K., Ungerstedt, U. & Henriksson, J. (2000). A microdialysis method for the in situ investigation of the action of large peptide molecules in human skeletal muscle: detection of local metabolic effects of insulin.. International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, 28(1), 69-73
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A microdialysis method for the in situ investigation of the action of large peptide molecules in human skeletal muscle: detection of local metabolic effects of insulin.
2000 (English)In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 69-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The possibility of using microdialysis catheters with a large pore size dialysis membrane (100 kDa) to investigate the action of macromolecules perfused into the interstitial space of peripheral tissues was explored. This was made possible by increasing the colloid osmotic pressure of the perfusate with 40 g/l of dextran-70 to prevent perfusate loss across the dialysis membranes. Microdialysis catheters were inserted into the quadriceps femoris muscle of 13 human subjects. With different perfusion flow rates (1. 33, 0.66, 0.33 and 0.16 microl/min) the recorded concentrations of glucose, lactate, and urea were in agreement with values previously obtained using a conventional membrane with a smaller pore size (20 kDa) [Rosdahl H, Hamrin K, Ungerstedt U, Henriksson. J Am J Physiol 1998;274:E936-45.]. When insulin was added to the perfusate, the concentration of glucose was significantly reduced, indicating that insulin diffuses across the dialysis membrane and has cellular effects that can be simultaneously recorded. The present findings are the first documentation on the use of microdialysis to study the local metabolic action of large peptide molecules in human tissues and may open new avenues for in-vivo metabolic research.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-1063 (URN)11033179 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-01-07 Created: 2010-01-07 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Rosdahl, H., Hamrin, K., Ungerstedt, U. & Henriksson, J. (1998). Metabolite levels in human skeletal muscle and adipose tissue studied with microdialysis at low perfusion flow.. The American journal of physiology, 274(5 Pt 1), E936-45
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metabolite levels in human skeletal muscle and adipose tissue studied with microdialysis at low perfusion flow.
1998 (English)In: The American journal of physiology, ISSN 0002-9513, Vol. 274, no 5 Pt 1, p. E936-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To identify a perfusion flow at which the interstitial fluid completely equilibrates with the microdialysis perfusion fluid, a protocol with successively lower perfusion flows was used. A colloid was included in the perfusion fluid to make sampling possible at the lowest perfusion flows. At 0.16 microliter/min, the measured metabolites had reached a complete equilibration in both tissues, and the measured concentrations of glucose, glycerol, and urea were in good agreement with expected tissue-specific levels. The glucose concentration in adipose tissue (4.98 +/- 0.14 mM) was equal to that of plasma (5.07 +/- 0.07 mM), whereas the concentration in muscle (4.41 +/- 0.11 mM) was lower than in plasma and adipose tissue (P < 0.001). The concentration of lactate was higher (P < 0.001) in muscle (2.39 +/- 0.22 mM) than in adipose tissue (1.30 +/- 0.12 mM), whereas the glycerol concentration in adipose tissue (233 +/- 19.7 microM) was higher (P < 0.001) than in muscle (40.8 +/- 3.0 microM) and in plasma (68.7 +/- 3.97 microM). The concentration of urea was equal in the two tissues. Overall, the study indicates that microdialysis at a low perfusion flow may be a tool to continuously monitor tissue interstitial concentrations.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-1066 (URN)9612253 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-01-07 Created: 2010-01-07 Last updated: 2017-03-01Bibliographically approved
Rosdahl, H., Hamrin, K., Ungerstedt, U. & Henriksson, J.Effect of adding a colloid to the perfusate on net fluid transport across the microdialysis membrane and on concentrations of metabolites in dialysate..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of adding a colloid to the perfusate on net fluid transport across the microdialysis membrane and on concentrations of metabolites in dialysate.
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-1080 (URN)
Note
Arbetet publicerades år 2002 i J. Appl. Physiol. med titeln Microdialysis in human skeletal muscle: effetcs of adding a colloid to the perfusateAvailable from: 2010-01-08 Created: 2010-01-08 Last updated: 2017-03-01Bibliographically approved
Rosdahl, H., Hamrin, K., Ungerstedt, U. & Henriksson, J.Insulin perfused through a microdialysis catheter with a 100 KDa dialysis membrane induces local metabolic effects in skeletal muscle..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Insulin perfused through a microdialysis catheter with a 100 KDa dialysis membrane induces local metabolic effects in skeletal muscle.
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-1081 (URN)
Note
Arbetet publicerades år 2000 i Int. J. of Biological Macromolecules med titeln A microdialysis method for the in situ investigation of the action of large peptide molecules in human skeletal muscle:detection of local metabolic effects of insulinAvailable from: 2010-01-08 Created: 2010-01-08 Last updated: 2017-03-01Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8248-0348

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