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Sundblad, Gunilla Brun
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Jansson, A., Sundblad, G. B., Lundvall, S. & Norberg, J. (2019). Assessing Students' Perceived Learning and Contentment in Physical Education: A Scale Development Study and Structural Equation Modeling Analysis.. Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, 23(3), 280-290
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing Students' Perceived Learning and Contentment in Physical Education: A Scale Development Study and Structural Equation Modeling Analysis.
2019 (English)In: Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, ISSN 1091-367X, E-ISSN 1532-7841, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 280-290Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although students' perceived learning is central in physical education (PE), few measurements are available. Furthermore, little is known about how students' perceptions of PE effect students' perceived learning in PE. Therefore, the aim was to develop a scale to assess students' perceived learning and a measurement to assess students' perceived contentment in PE, and furthermore, to analyze the interrelationship between students' perceived learning and students' perceived contentment in PE. A total of 1203 students in Sweden who were aged 12–16 years participated. The results from the exploratory (n = 601) and confirmatory (n = 602) factor analyses as well as the validity and reliability analyses showed that there was psychometric support for the one-dimensional model perceived learning in PE and for the three-dimensional model perceived contentment in PE. The structural equation modeling analyses showed that both competence and joyfulness were directly and positively related to students' perceived learning. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Physical education, perceived learning, perceived contentment, factor analysis, structural equation modeling
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5821 (URN)10.1080/1091367X.2019.1617713 (DOI)000483213600008 ()
Available from: 2019-08-27 Created: 2019-08-27 Last updated: 2019-09-17Bibliographically approved
Lundvall, S. & Brun Sundblad, G. (2018). “Learning nothing” in Physical Education and Health (PEH)?: a nine year follow-up study. In: Physical Education and Sport help build a Healthy Society: . Paper presented at ASIA FIEP (Federation International Education Physique): Physical Education and Sport help build a Healthy Society, Tunku Abdul Rahman University College, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 1-3 juni 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Learning nothing” in Physical Education and Health (PEH)?: a nine year follow-up study
2018 (English)In: Physical Education and Sport help build a Healthy Society, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Abstract

 “Learning nothing” in Physical Education and Health (PEH)? – a nine year follow-up study

The school subject Physical education and health (PEH) has during the last decades been under debate in several countries. Reports claim that students learn sport but not health. Literature also points to a gap between curriculum, pedagogy and assessment. Changes in society show new scenarios around health, wellbeing and illness among young people, and a growing uneven distribution of access to physical activity and knowledge in health. This leads to questions about students’ learning experiences from school PEH.

The aim of the presentation is to, with the help of a nine year follow-up study, describe and analyze students’ attitudes to participation and learning in PEH over the school years.

Method

The study was based on a population from randomly selected schools in Sweden, with students born 1991, 1988 and 1985. The year of the baseline study was 2001. Follow-up studies were made three, six and nine years later. The collecting of data was made by a self developed and adopted questionnaire with closed and open answers.The presentation will focus on the follow up study of the students born 1991, made six and nine years after the base line study. In 2010, 75% of the original population (1290) answered a revised, almost identical questionnaire. Frequency of data was analysed with descriptive statistics and cross tabulations. Chi-square was used for examining group differences *p<0.05 **p<0.01, ***p<0.001.Values >0.05 were considered as statistically non-significant (n.s.)

The results show a significant difference in participation pattern between male and female students, where 18% of the female students in relation to 8% of the male students, never or very seldom participated in PEH in their older ages. From 15 to 18 years of age, one third of those who experience that they learned “nothing” remained in this category. Leaving school, 21% of the students at the age of 18 thought that they knew well how to train and be physically active by their own. 2 out of 10 regarded themselves as not having this knowledge. Over one third of the students were uncertain of the relationships between health, life style and environment. The students’ general attitudes towards PEH in upper secondary school, as described in the open answers, have been categorised in two main themes: a request to get the opportunity to become more engaged in school physical activity, and a claim for a restructuring of  how PEH is organised and taught.

Conclusions

One conclusion from the study is the need for defined and understandable learning tasks with learning outcomes possible to be shared and assessed by both teachers and students. Possible pedagogical models will be discussed with the departure point from the concept health literacy and curriculum theory.

Keywords
students, learning, PE, follow up study, curriculum
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5568 (URN)
Conference
ASIA FIEP (Federation International Education Physique): Physical Education and Sport help build a Healthy Society, Tunku Abdul Rahman University College, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 1-3 juni 2018
Available from: 2019-01-20 Created: 2019-01-20 Last updated: 2019-01-20Bibliographically approved
Thedin Jakobsson, B., Sundblad, G. B., Lundvall, S. & Redelius, K. (2018). Participation patterns in Swedish youth sport.: A longitudinal study of participants aged 10-19 years.. Swedish Journal of Sport Research, 7(2), 25-52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Participation patterns in Swedish youth sport.: A longitudinal study of participants aged 10-19 years.
2018 (English)In: Swedish Journal of Sport Research, ISSN 2001-6018, E-ISSN 2001-9475, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 25-52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Sweden almost everyone participate in youth sport at one time or another. In recent years, however, overall participation rates have declined and many stop early. The aspiration of the sport confederation as well as the Swedish state is that young people should stay longer in sport which raises questions about participation patterns during adolescence, the ease of joining a sport club, and the barriers to remaining a participant. Drawing on a nine-year longitudinal study, this article reports on the participation patterns among a group of 241 youth that were followed from 10 to 19 years. They took part in four surveys (when they were 10, 13, 16 and 19 years of age). The results show a clear polarisation, one fourth did not take part at all or had only participated for a short time, one fourth participated all the time from the age of 10 to 19. Few started after the age of 10. The pathways for those continuing were characterised by diversification and not specialisation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Swedish Association for Behavioural and Social Research in Sport (SVEBI), 2018
Keywords
club sport, sports participation, youth, longitudinal.
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5533 (URN)
Available from: 2019-01-10 Created: 2019-01-10 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Graffman-Sahlberg, M., Brun Sundblad, G. & Lundvall, S. (2014). A Possible Mission?: An Action-based Case Study of a Teaching-Learning Model in Physical Education and Health. Swedish Journal of Sport Research (1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Possible Mission?: An Action-based Case Study of a Teaching-Learning Model in Physical Education and Health
2014 (English)In: Swedish Journal of Sport Research, ISSN 2001-9475, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Svebi, Svensk förening för beteende- och samhällsvetenskaplig idrottsforskning, 2014
Keywords
Health literacy, Physical education, Teaching-learning model, Educational outcome, Aerobic condition
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-3680 (URN)
Available from: 2015-01-12 Created: 2015-01-12 Last updated: 2016-02-25Bibliographically approved
Thedin Jakobsson, B., Brun Sundblad, G., Lundvall, S. & Redelius, K. (2014). In- and outflow in club sport: A longitudinal study among Swedish youth aged 10-19 years.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In- and outflow in club sport: A longitudinal study among Swedish youth aged 10-19 years
2014 (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-3633 (URN)
Note

At the time of Britta Thedin Jakobsson's dissertation the article was submitted.

Available from: 2015-01-02 Created: 2015-01-02 Last updated: 2018-03-09Bibliographically approved
Graffman-Sahlberg, M., Brun Sundblad, G. & Lundvall, S. (2014). Teaching Health for Understanding?: A phenomenographic analysis of learn-ing experiences.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teaching Health for Understanding?: A phenomenographic analysis of learn-ing experiences
2014 (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Didactics
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-3729 (URN)
Note

At the time of Marie Graffman-Sahlbergs dissertation the article was submitted.

Available from: 2015-02-11 Created: 2015-02-11 Last updated: 2016-02-25Bibliographically approved
Lundvall, S. & Brun Sundblad, G. (2013). Healthier Generation through Physical Education?. In: Next Practice in Physical Education and Movement Science: The 2nd NORDPLUS-IDROTT Conference. Paper presented at Next Practice in Physical Education and Movement Science. The 2nd NORDPLUS-IDROTT Conference. May 6th to 8th 2013, Odense, Region of Southern Denmark (pp. 31). Syddansk Universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healthier Generation through Physical Education?
2013 (English)In: Next Practice in Physical Education and Movement Science: The 2nd NORDPLUS-IDROTT Conference, Syddansk Universitet, 2013, p. 31-Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Physical education has during the last decades been under debate in several countries. Reports claim that students learn sport but not health. Alongside with this, changes in society show new scenarios around health, wellbeing and illness among young people, and a growing uneven distribution of access to physical activity and knowledge in health. This leads to questions about students’ learning experiences from school PE. The aim of the presentation is to, with the help of a nine year follow-up study, describe and analyze students’ attitudes to participation and learning in PE over the school years. The study consists of a population from randomly selected schools in Sweden, with students aged 9, 12, and 15, in the year of the baseline study, 2001. Follow-up studies were made three, six and nine years later. In 2010, 75% of the original population (1290) answered a revised, almost identical questionnaire. The results show a significant difference in participation pattern between male and female students, where 18% of the female students never or very seldom participates in PE in their older ages, in relation to 8% of the male students. From 15 to 18 years of age, one third of those who experience that they learned “nothing” remained in this category. Leaving school, 21% of the students at the age of 18 thought that they knew well how to train and be physically active by their own. 2 out of 10 regarded themselves as not having this knowledge at all. Over one third of the students were uncertain of relationships between health, life style and environment. Those who scored themselves as very active in the age of 12, were also the ones most stable over the years, with the female students being the most stable. Future challenges for PE and health will be discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Syddansk Universitet, 2013
Keywords
physical education, longitudinal, health, learning, physical activity
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-3168 (URN)
Conference
Next Practice in Physical Education and Movement Science. The 2nd NORDPLUS-IDROTT Conference. May 6th to 8th 2013, Odense, Region of Southern Denmark
Projects
Skola-idrott-hälsa projektet, GIH
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports
Available from: 2013-12-28 Created: 2013-12-28 Last updated: 2016-02-25Bibliographically approved
Lundvall, S. & Brun Sundblad, G. (2013). Learning experiences in Physical Education and Health : a longitudinal study. In: : . Paper presented at Physical Education and Sport: Promoting Gender Equality. The 17th International Conference on Women and Girls’ Sport (IAEPSGW), 10th - 13th April 2013 in Havana, Cuba.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning experiences in Physical Education and Health : a longitudinal study
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Physical education and health (PEH) have during the last decades been under debate in several countries. Reports claim that students learn sport but not health. Changes in society show new scenarios around health, wellbeing and illness among young people, and a growing uneven distribution of access to physical activity and knowledge in health. This leads to questions about students’ learning experiences from school PE.

 

The aim of the presentation is to, with the help of a nine year follow-up study, describe and analyze students’ attitudes to participation and learning in PE over the school years. The study consists of a population from randomly selected schools in Sweden, with students aged 9, 12, and 15, in the year of the baseline study, 2001. Follow-up studies were made three, six and nine years later. In 2010, 75% of the original population (1290) answered a revised, almost identical questionnaire.

 

The results show a significant difference in participation pattern between male and female students, where 18% of the female students in relation to 8% of the male students never or very seldom participates in PE in their older ages. From 15 to 18 years of age, one third of those who experience that they learned “nothing” remained in this category. Leaving school, 21% of the students at the age of 18 thought that they knew well how to train and be physically active by their own. 2 out of 10 regarded themselves as not having this knowledge. Over one third of the students were uncertain of relationships between health, life style and environment. One conclusion from the study is the need for a reworked model of how to become a learner in PEH. Conclusions and future challenges for PEH will be discussed.

Keywords
learning, physical education, physical activity, longitudinal, Sweden
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-3166 (URN)
Conference
Physical Education and Sport: Promoting Gender Equality. The 17th International Conference on Women and Girls’ Sport (IAEPSGW), 10th - 13th April 2013 in Havana, Cuba
Projects
Skola-idrott-hälsa projektet, GIH
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports
Available from: 2013-12-28 Created: 2013-12-28 Last updated: 2016-02-25Bibliographically approved
Brun Sundblad, G., Lundvall, S. & Engström, L.-M. (2013). Studenter tar plats i SIH-projektet. Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, 22(1), 20-24
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Studenter tar plats i SIH-projektet
2013 (Swedish)In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 20-24Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [sv]

I drygt tio år har SIH-projektet kartlagt ungas upplevda hälsa, fysiska status och aktivitetsgrad, och dessutom skolämnet idrott och hälsa. Studenter vid GIH har medverkat i projektet och bidragit med forskningsdata. I artikeln presenteras aktuella resultat och hur projektet har integrerats i studenternas utbildning samt vetenskapliga skolning.

National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-2991 (URN)
Available from: 2013-10-28 Created: 2013-10-25 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Ekblom, Ö., Kraepelien Strid, E., Tidén, A., Nyberg, M., Sundblad, G. B. & Lundvall, S. (2012). Predictors of adolescent fitness levels among Swedish adolescents, a longitudinal study. In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport: . Paper presented at Be Active 2012. Sydney, Australia (pp. S185). , 15(Supplement 1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictors of adolescent fitness levels among Swedish adolescents, a longitudinal study
Show others...
2012 (English)In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 2012, Vol. 15, no Supplement 1, p. S185-Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: It has been consistently demonstrated that low aerobic fitness is causally linked to increased cardio-metabolic risk. Aerobic fitness has also been causally related to cognitive function. From adolescence and onwards, the inter-individual stability ("tracking") in fitness is fairly high. An individual's fitness level in adolescence is therefore a central determinant for future health. However, childhood predictors of adolescent fitness levels are largely unknown. The present study aimed at identifying personal, school-specific and structural determinants in childhood (age 10 yrs) for adolescent aerobic fitness (at age 16 yrs).

Methods: Body mass index-based overweight status (normal weight vs overweight/obese, according to Cole et al.) and gross motor skills (based on the Tidén-Nyberg test) were measured at baseline in 209 Swedish children (mean [SD] age 9.8 [0.60] yrs) from randomly selected schools on Sweden. Immigration status (self-report) and average household income in quartiles on community level (register obtained) were used as possible structural confounders. Data on educational status of the PE teacher and lesson structure (gender-separated vs mixed classes) was obtained from the PE teacher. At the reexamination (at age 15.8 [0.33] yrs), aerobic fitness was estimated using the Åstrand-Ryhming nomogram. Low aerobic fitness was defined as below the first quartile (29.7 mL x min-1 x kg-1). Risk for low aerobic fitness was assessed using logistic regression

Results: Risk for low aerobic fitness at follow-up was lower in children who were normal weight (OR: 0.23.95% CI: 0.10 to 0.49) and in children with trained PE-teachers (OR: 0.40, 95% CI: 0.17 to 0.93), but higher among children with poor gross motor skills (OR:1.84, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.13) at baseline. Gender, immigration history, neighborhood economical status and lesson structure were all non-significant predictors of low adolescent fitness.

Discussion: The results stress the importance for early overweight prevention and treatment and for professional identification and treatment of children with impaired gross motor skills at young ages. In Sweden, a lagre proportion of PE-teachers in lower grades lack formal PE-teacher education, which according to the present study poses a threat to children's future health. Early screening and treatment of children with limited motor proficiencies seems may help children adapting a physically active lifestyle and avoiding low fitness levels in adolescence and young adulthood.

National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-3749 (URN)10.1016/j.jsams.2012.11.449 (DOI)
Conference
Be Active 2012. Sydney, Australia
Available from: 2015-02-26 Created: 2015-02-26 Last updated: 2016-09-05Bibliographically approved
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