Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH

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Cardinale, Daniele A.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8607-550X
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Publications (10 of 24) Show all publications
Xuan, X., Chen, C., Molinero-Fernandez, A., Ekelund, E., Cardinale, D. A., Swarén, M., . . . Crespo, G. A. (2023). Fully Integrated Wearable Device for Continuous Sweat Lactate Monitoring in Sports.. ACS Sensors , 8(6), 2401-2409
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fully Integrated Wearable Device for Continuous Sweat Lactate Monitoring in Sports.
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2023 (English)In: ACS Sensors , E-ISSN 2379-3694, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 2401-2409Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The chemical digitalization of sweat using wearable sensing interfaces is an attractive alternative to traditional blood-based protocols in sports. Although sweat lactate has been claimed to be a relevant biomarker in sports, an analytically validated wearable system to prove that has not yet been developed. We present a fully integrated sweat lactate sensing system applicable to in situ perspiration analysis. The device can be conveniently worn in the skin to monitor real-time sweat lactate during sports, such as cycling and kayaking. The novelty of the system is threefold: advanced microfluidics design for sweat collection and analysis, an analytically validated lactate biosensor based on a rational design of an outer diffusion-limiting membrane, and an integrated circuit for signal processing with a custom smartphone application. The sensor covering the range expected for lactate in sweat (1-20 mM), with appropriate sensitivity (-12.5 ± 0.53 nA mM-1), shows an acceptable response time (<90 s), and the influence of changes in pH, temperature, and flow rate are neglectable. Also, the sensor is analytically suitable with regard to reversibility, resilience, and reproducibility. The sensing device is validated through a relatively high number of on-body tests performed with elite athletes cycling and kayaking in controlled environments. Correlation outcomes between sweat lactate and other physiological indicators typically accessible in sports laboratories (blood lactate, perceived exhaustion, heart rate, blood glucose, respiratory quotient) are also presented and discussed in relation to the sport performance monitoring capability of continuous sweat lactate.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2023
Keywords
chemical digitization, outer diffusion-limiting membrane, sensing device, sweat lactate, wearable sensing interfaces
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Analytical Chemistry
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7670 (URN)10.1021/acssensors.3c00708 (DOI)001003383700001 ()37289663 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-06-26 Created: 2023-06-26 Last updated: 2023-08-21
Lännerström, J., Nilsson, L. C., Cardinale, D. A., Björklund, G. & Larsen, F. J. (2021). Effects of Plyometric Training on Soft and Hard Surfaces for Improving Running Economy.. Journal of Human Kinetics, 79(1), 187-196
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Plyometric Training on Soft and Hard Surfaces for Improving Running Economy.
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2021 (English)In: Journal of Human Kinetics, ISSN 1640-5544, E-ISSN 1899-7562, Vol. 79, no 1, p. 187-196Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study investigated the effects of plyometric jump training on hard and soft surfaces on running economy (RE), maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), running performance and the rate of force development in orienteers. Nineteen orienteers (11 women and 8 men, body mass 61.1 ± 7.3 kg, age 21 ± 5.8 yrs) were randomly stratified based on sex, age, VO2max and RE to plyometric jumping training (8 sessions over 4 weeks) on either a hard or a soft surface. RE, VO2max and running performance were assessed on a treadmill and outdoor on- and off-trail loops. Moreover, ground reaction forces and force development were assessed during a one leg drop-jump test. The training intervention led to an overall 2-7% improvement in treadmill and off-trail RE, independent of the jumping surface and running velocity assessed. These improvements were not explained by force development during drop jump tests, which remained unchanged following the intervention. The changes in time-trial performance were associated with changes in RE. Plyometric training improved RE with no difference between the hard or the soft training surface and improved RE was also independent of the running speed assessed. Furthermore, improved running performance was associated with changes in RE after the intervention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sciendo, 2021
Keywords
orienteers, plyometric jump training, running economy, surface
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6768 (URN)10.2478/hukin-2021-0071 (DOI)000680047100017 ()34400998 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports
Available from: 2021-08-18 Created: 2021-08-18 Last updated: 2023-01-09Bibliographically approved
Cardinale, D. A., Gejl, K. D., Petersen, K. G., Nielsen, J., Ørtenblad, N. & Larsen, F. J. (2021). Short term intensified training temporarily impairs mitochondrial respiratory capacity in elite endurance athletes.. Journal of applied physiology, 131(1), 388-400
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Short term intensified training temporarily impairs mitochondrial respiratory capacity in elite endurance athletes.
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2021 (English)In: Journal of applied physiology, ISSN 8750-7587, E-ISSN 1522-1601, Vol. 131, no 1, p. 388-400Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: The maintenance of healthy and functional mitochondria is the result of a complex mitochondrial turnover and herein quality-control program which includes both mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy of mitochondria. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of an intensified training load on skeletal muscle mitochondrial quality control in relation to changes in mitochondrial oxidative capacity, maximal oxygen consumption and performance in highly trained endurance athletes.

METHODS: 27 elite endurance athletes performed high intensity interval exercise followed by moderate intensity continuous exercise 3 days per week for 4 weeks in addition to their usual volume of training. Mitochondrial oxidative capacity, abundance of mitochondrial proteins, markers of autophagy and antioxidant capacity of skeletal muscle were assessed in skeletal muscle biopsies before and after the intensified training period.

RESULTS: The intensified training period increased several autophagy markers suggesting an increased turnover of mitochondrial and cytosolic proteins. In permeabilized muscle fibers, mitochondrial respiration was ~20 % lower after training although some markers of mitochondrial density increased by 5-50%, indicative of a reduced mitochondrial quality by the intensified training intervention. The antioxidative proteins UCP3, ANT1, and SOD2 were increased after training, whereas we found an inactivation of aconitase. In agreement with the lower aconitase activity, the amount of mitochondrial LON protease that selectively degrades oxidized aconitase, was doubled.

CONCLUSION: Together, this suggests that mitochondrial respiratory function is impaired during the initial recovery from a period of intensified endurance training while mitochondrial quality control is slightly activated in highly trained skeletal muscle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Physiological Society, 2021
Keywords
athletes, endurance, mitochondrial oxidative capacity, mitochondrial quality-control, mitophagy
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6735 (URN)10.1152/japplphysiol.00829.2020 (DOI)000693664200047 ()34110230 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-06-23 Created: 2021-06-23 Last updated: 2022-12-06Bibliographically approved
Cardinale, D. A., Horwath, O., Elings-Knutsson, J., Helge, T., Godhe, M., Bermon, S., . . . Ekblom, B. (2020). Enhanced Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Capacity and Capillary-to-Fiber Ratio Following Moderately Increased Testosterone Exposure in Young Healthy Women. Frontiers in Physiology, 11, Article ID 585490.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enhanced Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Capacity and Capillary-to-Fiber Ratio Following Moderately Increased Testosterone Exposure in Young Healthy Women
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2020 (English)In: Frontiers in Physiology, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 11, article id 585490Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Recently, it was shown that exogenously administered testosterone enhances endurance capacity in women. In this study, our understanding on the effects of exogenous testosterone on key determinants of oxygen transport and utilization in skeletal muscle is expanded.Methods: In a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, 48 healthy active women were randomized to 10 weeks of daily application of 10 mg of testosterone cream or placebo. Before and after the intervention, VO<sub>2</sub> max, body composition, total hemoglobin (Hb) mass and blood volumes were assessed. Biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle were obtained before and after the intervention to assess mitochondrial protein abundance, capillary density, capillary-to-fiber (C/F) ratio, and skeletal muscle oxidative capacity.Results: Maximal oxygen consumption per muscle mass, Hb mass, blood, plasma and red blood cell volumes, capillary density, and the abundance of mitochondrial protein levels (i.e., citrate synthase, complexes I, II, III, IV-subunit 2, IV-subunit 4, and V) were unchanged by the intervention. However, the C/F ratio, specific mitochondrial respiratory flux activating complex I and linked complex I and II, uncoupled respiration and electron transport system capacity, but not leak respiration or fat respiration, were significantly increased following testosterone administration compared to placebo.Conclusion: This study provides novel insights into physiological actions of increased testosterone exposure on key determinants of oxygen diffusion and utilization in skeletal muscle of women. Our findings show that higher skeletal muscle oxidative capacity coupled to higher C/F ratio could be major contributing factors that improve endurance performance following moderately increased testosterone exposure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2020
Keywords
endurance performance, mitochondria, muscle morphology, oxidative, testosterone
National Category
Physiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology; Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6436 (URN)10.3389/fphys.2020.585490 (DOI)000599568300001 ()33343388 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-12-14 Created: 2020-12-14 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Bovard, J., Cardinale, D. A., Larsen, F. J., Reiter, E., Jensen-Urstad, M., Rullman, E., . . . Boushel, R. (2020). Sex-differences In Exercising Hemodynamics: Role Of Exercising Muscle Mass. In: MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE. 52:17. Suppl. Meeting Abstract: 924: . Paper presented at American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Virtual Conference, 2020, ELECTR NETWORK (pp. 224-224). Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 52(17)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sex-differences In Exercising Hemodynamics: Role Of Exercising Muscle Mass
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2020 (English)In: MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE. 52:17. Suppl. Meeting Abstract: 924, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2020, Vol. 52, no 17, p. 224-224Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2020
National Category
Physiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6482 (URN)000590026300626 ()
Conference
American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Virtual Conference, 2020, ELECTR NETWORK
Available from: 2021-01-07 Created: 2021-01-07 Last updated: 2022-12-06Bibliographically approved
Cardinale, D. A., Larsen, F. J., Lindholm, P., Ekblom, B. & Boushel, R. (2019). Effects Of Hyperoxic-Supplemented High Intensity Interval Training On Endurance Performance, Maximal Oxygen Consumption And Mitochondrial Function In Trained Cyclists. In: MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE Vol 51(2019):6. Supplement: S, Meeting Abstract: 1753: . Paper presented at Annual Meeting of the American-College-of-Sports-Medicine (ACSM), MAY 28-JUN 01, 2019, Orlando, FL (pp. 463-464). Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 51(6)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects Of Hyperoxic-Supplemented High Intensity Interval Training On Endurance Performance, Maximal Oxygen Consumption And Mitochondrial Function In Trained Cyclists
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2019 (English)In: MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE Vol 51(2019):6. Supplement: S, Meeting Abstract: 1753, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2019, Vol. 51, no 6, p. 463-464Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2019
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5836 (URN)10.1249/01.mss.0000561892.45529.46 (DOI)000481662801604 ()
Conference
Annual Meeting of the American-College-of-Sports-Medicine (ACSM), MAY 28-JUN 01, 2019, Orlando, FL
Available from: 2019-09-17 Created: 2019-09-17 Last updated: 2022-12-06Bibliographically approved
Cardinale, D. A., Larsen, F. J., Lännerström, J., Manselin, T., Södergård, O., Mijwel, S., . . . Boushel, R. (2019). Influence of Hyperoxic-Supplemented High-Intensity Interval Training on Hemotological and Muscle Mitochondrial Adaptations in Trained Cyclists.. Frontiers in Physiology, 10, Article ID 730.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of Hyperoxic-Supplemented High-Intensity Interval Training on Hemotological and Muscle Mitochondrial Adaptations in Trained Cyclists.
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2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Physiology, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 10, article id 730Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Hyperoxia (HYPER) increases O2 carrying capacity resulting in a higher O2 delivery to the working muscles during exercise. Several lines of evidence indicate that lactate metabolism, power output, and endurance are improved by HYPER compared to normoxia (NORM). Since HYPER enables a higher exercise power output compared to NORM and considering the O2 delivery limitation at exercise intensities near to maximum, we hypothesized that hyperoxic-supplemented high-intensity interval training (HIIT) would upregulate muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity and enhance endurance cycling performance compared to training in normoxia. Methods: 23 trained cyclists, age 35.3 ± 6.4 years, body mass 75.2 ± 9.6 kg, height 179.8 ± 7.9 m, and VO2max 4.5 ± 0.7 L min-1 performed 6 weeks polarized and periodized endurance training on a cycle ergometer consisting of supervised HIIT sessions 3 days/week and additional low-intensity training 2 days/week. Participants were randomly assigned to either HYPER (FIO2 0.30; n = 12) or NORM (FIO2 0.21; n = 11) breathing condition during HIIT. Mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized fibers and isolated mitochondria together with maximal and submaximal VO2, hematological parameters, and self-paced endurance cycling performance were tested pre- and posttraining intervention. Results: Hyperoxic training led to a small, non-significant change in performance compared to normoxic training (HYPER 6.0 ± 3.7%, NORM 2.4 ± 5.0%; p = 0.073, ES = 0.32). This small, beneficial effect on the self-paced endurance cycling performance was not explained by the change in VO2max (HYPER 1.1 ± 3.8%, NORM 0.0 ± 3.7%; p = 0.55, ES = 0.08), blood volume and hemoglobin mass, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity (permeabilized fibers: HYPER 27.3 ± 46.0%, NORM 16.5 ± 49.1%; p = 0.37, ES = 3.24 and in isolated mitochondria: HYPER 26.1 ± 80.1%, NORM 15.9 ± 73.3%; p = 0.66, ES = 0.51), or markers of mitochondrial content which were similar between groups post intervention. Conclusions: This study showed that 6 weeks hyperoxic-supplemented HIIT led to marginal gain in cycle performance in already trained cyclists without change in VO2max, blood volume, hemoglobin mass, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity, or exercise efficiency. The underlying mechanisms for the potentially meaningful performance effects of hyperoxia training remain unexplained and may raise ethical questions for elite sport.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
OXPHOS, VO2max, cycling performance, high-intensity interval training, hyperoxia, mitochondria
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5805 (URN)10.3389/fphys.2019.00730 (DOI)000472046700001 ()31258485 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-14 Created: 2019-08-14 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Cardinale, D. A., Larsen, F. J., Jensen-Urstad, M., Rullman, E., Søndergaard, H., Morales-Alamo, D., . . . Boushel, R. (2019). Muscle mass and inspired oxygen influence oxygen extraction at maximal exercise: role of mitochondrial oxygen affinity.. Acta Physiologica, 225(1), Article ID e13110.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Muscle mass and inspired oxygen influence oxygen extraction at maximal exercise: role of mitochondrial oxygen affinity.
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2019 (English)In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 225, no 1, article id e13110Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM:We examined the Fick components together with mitochondrial O2 affinity (p50mito ) in defining O2 extraction and O2 uptake during exercise with large and small muscle mass during normoxia (NORM) and hyperoxia (HYPER).

METHODS:Seven individuals performed two incremental exercise tests to exhaustion on a bicycle ergometer (BIKE) and two on a one-legged knee extension ergometer (KE) in NORM or HYPER. Leg blood flow and VO2 were determined by thermodilution and the Fick method. Maximal ADP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration (OXPHOS) and p50mito were measured ex vivo in isolated mitochondria. Mitochondrial excess capacity in the leg was determined from OXPHOS in permeabilized fibers and muscle mass measured with magnetic resonance imaging in relation to peak leg O2 delivery.

RESULTS:The ex vivo p50mito increased from 0.06±0.02 to 0.17±0.04 kPa with varying substrate supply and O2 flux rates from 9.84±2.91 to 16.34±4.07 pmol O2 ·s-1 ·μg-1 respectively. O2 extraction decreased from 83% in BIKE to 67% in KE as a function of a higher O2 delivery, and lower mitochondrial excess capacity. There was a significant relationship between O2 extraction and mitochondrial excess capacity and p50mito that was unrelated to blood flow and mean transit time.

CONCLUSION:O2 extraction varies with mitochondrial respiration rate, p50mito and O2 delivery. Mitochondrial excess capacity maintains a low p50mito which enhances O2 diffusion from microvessels to mitochondria during exercise. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2019
Keywords
OXPHOS, VO2max, Fick method, hyperoxia, mitochondrial p50, muscle O2 diffusion, thermodilution technique
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5287 (URN)10.1111/apha.13110 (DOI)000454605500006 ()29863764 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-06-07 Created: 2018-06-07 Last updated: 2022-12-06Bibliographically approved
Mijwel, S., Cardinale, D. A., Norrbom, J., Chapman, M., Ivarsson, N., Wengström, Y., . . . Rundqvist, H. (2018). Exercise training during chemotherapy preserves skeletal muscle fiber area, capillarization, and mitochondrial content in patients with breast cancer.. The FASEB Journal, 32(10), 5495-5505, Article ID fj201700968R.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exercise training during chemotherapy preserves skeletal muscle fiber area, capillarization, and mitochondrial content in patients with breast cancer.
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2018 (English)In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 32, no 10, p. 5495-5505, article id fj201700968RArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Exercise has been suggested to ameliorate the detrimental effects of chemotherapy on skeletal muscle. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of different exercise regimens with usual care on skeletal muscle morphology and mitochondrial markers in patients being treated with chemotherapy for breast cancer. Specifically, we compared moderate-intensity aerobic training combined with high-intensity interval training (AT-HIIT) and resistance training combined with high-intensity interval training (RT-HIIT) with usual care (UC). Resting skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained pre- and postintervention from 23 randomly selected women from the OptiTrain breast cancer trial who underwent RT-HIIT, AT-HIIT, or UC for 16 wk. Over the intervention, citrate synthase activity, muscle fiber cross-sectional area, capillaries per fiber, and myosin heavy chain isoform type I were reduced in UC, whereas RT-HIIT and AT-HIIT were able to counteract these declines. AT-HIIT promoted up-regulation of the electron transport chain protein levels vs. UC. RT-HIIT favored satellite cell count vs. UC and AT-HIIT. There was a significant association between change in citrate synthase activity and self-reported fatigue. AT-HIIT and RT-HIIT maintained or improved markers of skeletal muscle function compared with the declines found in the UC group, indicating a sustained trainability in addition to the preservation of skeletal muscle structural and metabolic characteristics during chemotherapy. These findings highlight the importance of supervised exercise programs for patients with breast cancer during chemotherapy.-Mijwel, S., Cardinale, D. A., Norrbom, J., Chapman, M., Ivarsson, N., Wengström, Y., Sundberg, C. J., Rundqvist, H. Exercise training during chemotherapy preserves skeletal muscle fiber area, capillarization, and mitochondrial content in patients with breast cancer.

Keywords
concurrent training, exercise training adaptation, high-intensity interval training, oxidative phosphorylation
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5279 (URN)10.1096/fj.201700968R (DOI)000447972500025 ()29750574 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-31 Created: 2018-05-31 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
Cardinale, D. A. & Ekblom, B. (2018). Hyperoxia for performance and training.. Journal of Sports Sciences (13), 1515-1522
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hyperoxia for performance and training.
2018 (English)In: Journal of Sports Sciences, ISSN 0264-0414, E-ISSN 1466-447X, no 13, p. 1515-1522Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent technological developments have made it possible to use hyperoxia as an enhancement aid during training. Athletes wearing a mask can breathe a higher fraction of oxygen from a stationary or portable apparatus while exercising. A large body of evidence indicates that the oxygen transport capacity, lactate metabolism, power output and work tolerance (endurance) are improved when breathing hyperoxia. The physiological mechanisms underlying these performance improvements, although still not fully elucidated, are based on higher oxygen delivery and reduced central fatigue. Although much is known about the acute effects of hyperoxia, the effect of hyperoxic-supplemented endurance training on performance and the mechanisms beneath training adaptations are not very well understood, especially in well-trained endurance athletes. The few studies on the physiological effects of hyperoxia training have been conducted with conflicting results, discussed in this paper. Potential detrimental effects have not yet been shown experimentally and warrant further investigation.

Keywords
Hyperoxia, endurance training, oxygen transport
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5068 (URN)10.1080/02640414.2017.1398893 (DOI)000428863700013 ()29115912 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-11-16 Created: 2017-11-16 Last updated: 2018-05-25Bibliographically approved
Projects
The effect of carbon monoxide inhalation on exercise-induced adaptation in endurance athletes [CIF P2022-0019]; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8607-550X

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