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Publications (10 of 19) Show all publications
Taaffe, D. R., Newton, R. U., Spry, N., Joseph, D., Chambers, S. K., Gardiner, R. A., . . . Galvão, D. A. (2017). Effects of Different Exercise Modalities on Fatigue in Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Androgen Deprivation Therapy: A Year-long Randomised Controlled Trial.. Paper presented at Volume 72, Issue 2, August 2017, Pages 293-299. European Urology, 72(2), 293-299, Article ID S0302-2838(17)30108-2.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Different Exercise Modalities on Fatigue in Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Androgen Deprivation Therapy: A Year-long Randomised Controlled Trial.
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2017 (English)In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 293-299, article id S0302-2838(17)30108-2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Physical exercise mitigates fatigue during androgen deprivation therapy (ADT); however, the effects of different exercise prescriptions are unknown.

OBJECTIVES: To determine the long-term effects of different exercise modes on fatigue in prostate cancer patients undergoing ADT.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Between 2009 and 2012, 163 prostate cancer patients aged 43-90 y on ADT were randomised to exercise targeting the musculoskeletal system (impact loading+resistance training; ILRT; n=58), the cardiovascular and muscular systems (aerobic+resistance training; ART; n=54), or to usual care/delayed exercise (DEL; n=51) for 12 mo across university-affiliated exercise clinics in Australia.

INTERVENTION: Supervised ILRT for 12 mo, supervised ART for 6 mo followed by a 6-mo home program, and DEL received a printed booklet on exercise information for 6 mo followed by 6-mo stationary cycling exercise.

OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Fatigue was assessed using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 36 and vitality using the Short Form-36. Analysis of variance was used to compare outcomes for groups at 6 mo and 12 mo.

RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: Fatigue was reduced (p=0.005) in ILRT at 6 mo and 12 mo (∼5 points), and in ART (p=0.005) and DEL (p=0.022) at 12 mo. Similarly, vitality increased for all groups (p≤0.001) at 12 mo (∼4 points). Those with the highest levels of fatigue and lowest vitality improved the most with exercise (ptrend<0.001). A limitation was inclusion of mostly well-functioning individuals.

CONCLUSIONS: Different exercise modes have comparable effects on reducing fatigue and enhancing vitality during ADT. Patients with the highest levels of fatigue and lowest vitality had the greatest benefits.

PATIENT SUMMARY: We compared the effects of different exercise modes on fatigue in men on androgen deprivation therapy. All exercise programs reduced fatigue and enhanced vitality. We conclude that undertaking some form of exercise will help reduce fatigue, especially in those who are the most fatigued.

Keywords
Aerobic exercise, Androgen deprivation therapy, Exercise, Exercise prescription, Fatigue, Prostate cancer, Resistance exercise
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4799 (URN)10.1016/j.eururo.2017.02.019 (DOI)000405199100031 ()28249801 (PubMedID)
Conference
Volume 72, Issue 2, August 2017, Pages 293-299
Available from: 2017-03-03 Created: 2017-03-03 Last updated: 2017-11-06Bibliographically approved
Wengström, Y., Bolam, K. A., Mijwel, S., Sundberg, C. J., Backman, M., Browall, M., . . . Rundqvist, H. (2017). Optitrain: a randomised controlled exercise trial for women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy.. BMC Cancer, 17, Article ID 100.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Optitrain: a randomised controlled exercise trial for women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy.
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2017 (English)In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 17, article id 100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy suffer from a range of detrimental disease and treatment related side-effects. Exercise has shown to be able to counter some of these side-effects and improve physical function as well as quality of life. The primary aim of the study is to investigate and compare the effects of two different exercise regimens on the primary outcome cancer-related fatigue and the secondary outcomes muscle strength, function and structure, cardiovascular fitness, systemic inflammation, skeletal muscle gene activity, health related quality of life, pain, disease and treatment-related symptoms in women with breast cancer receiving chemotherapy. The second aim is to examine if any effects are sustained 1, 2, and 5 years following the completion of the intervention and to monitor return to work, recurrence and survival. The third aim of the study is to examine the effect of attendance and adherence rates on the effects of the exercise programme.

METHODS: This study is a randomised controlled trial including 240 women with breast cancer receiving chemotherapy in Stockholm, Sweden. The participants are randomly allocated to either: group 1: Aerobic training, group 2: Combined resistance and aerobic training, or group 3: usual care (control group). During the 5-year follow-up period, participants in the exercise groups will receive a physical activity prescription. Measurements for endpoints will take place at baseline, after 16 weeks (end of intervention) as well as after 1, 2 and 5 years.

DISCUSSION: This randomised controlled trial will generate substantial information regarding the effects of different types of exercise on the health of patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. We expect that dissemination of the knowledge gained from this study will contribute to developing effective long term strategies to improve the physical and psychosocial health of breast cancer survivors.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: OptiTrain - Optimal Training Women with Breast Cancer (OptiTrain), NCT02522260 ; Registration: June 9, 2015, Last updated version Feb 29, 2016. Retrospectively registered.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4777 (URN)10.1186/s12885-017-3079-x (DOI)000393841600001 ()28166765 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-02-17 Created: 2017-02-17 Last updated: 2017-11-29
Bolam, K. A., Skinner, T. L., Sax, A. T., Adlard, K. N. & Taaffe, D. R. (2016). A Comparison of Bone Mineral Density in Amateur Male Boxers and Active Non-boxers.. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 37(9), 694-699
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Comparison of Bone Mineral Density in Amateur Male Boxers and Active Non-boxers.
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2016 (English)In: International Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0172-4622, E-ISSN 1439-3964, Vol. 37, no 9, p. 694-699Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To examine the site-specific osteogenic effect of upper limb impact-loading activity we compared the forearm and arm bone mineral density (BMD) of male boxers to that of active controls. A cross-sectional study was performed with 30 amateur male boxers (aged 18-44 years) and 32 age-matched, non-boxing, active controls. Participants had their regional and whole body BMD and bone mineral content (BMC) assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Hand grip strength, testosterone, oestradiol, sex hormone-binding globulin, vitamin D, lean and fat mass, and past and current physical activity were also assessed. Forearm and arm BMD were 1.5-2.2% higher in boxers than the control group although this was not statistically significant (p>0.05), with no significant difference for BMC (p>0.05). There were no differences between groups for spine, hip, or whole body BMD or BMC, or for body composition or hormone status. Within the arms, lean mass was associated with BMD and BMC in both boxers and the control group (BMD, r=0.60-0.76, p<0.001; BMC, r=0.67-0.82, p<0.001). There were no significant differences between amateur boxers and the control group for upper limb BMD and BMC. However, muscle mass appears to be particularly important to bone health of the upper limbs.

National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4459 (URN)10.1055/s-0042-104200 (DOI)27203576 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-06-15 Created: 2016-06-15 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Bolam, K. & Hagströmer, M. (2016). Hur finner vi de fysiskt inaktiva?. Idrottsmedicin, 35(3), 8-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hur finner vi de fysiskt inaktiva?
2016 (Swedish)In: Idrottsmedicin, ISSN 2001-3302, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 8-11Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Svensk förening för fysisk aktivitet och idrottsmedicin, 2016
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4598 (URN)
Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2016-10-03Bibliographically approved
Skinner, T. L., Peeters, G. G., Croci, I., Bell, K. R., Burton, N. W., Chambers, S. K. & Bolam, K. A. (2016). Impact of a brief exercise program on the physical and psychosocial health of prostate cancer survivors: A pilot study.. Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, 12(3), 225-234
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of a brief exercise program on the physical and psychosocial health of prostate cancer survivors: A pilot study.
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2016 (English)In: Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 1743-7563, E-ISSN 1743-7563, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 225-234Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: It is well established that exercise is beneficial for prostate cancer survivors. The challenge for health professionals is to create effective strategies to encourage survivors to exercise in the community. Many community exercise programs are brief in duration (e.g. <5 exercise sessions); whilst evidence for the efficacy of exercise within the literature are derived from exercise programs ≥8 weeks in duration, it is unknown if health benefits can be obtained from a shorter program. This study examined the effect of a four-session individualized and supervised exercise program on the physical and psychosocial health of prostate cancer survivors.

METHODS: Fifty-one prostate cancer survivors (mean age 69±7 years) were prescribed 1 h, individualized, supervised exercise sessions once weekly for 4 weeks. Participants were encouraged to increase their physical activity levels outside of the exercise sessions. Objective measures of muscular strength, exercise capacity, physical function and flexibility; and self-reported general, disease-specific and psychosocial health were assessed at baseline and following the intervention.

RESULTS: Improvements were observed in muscle strength (leg press 17.6 percent; P < 0.001), exercise capacity (400-m walk 9.3 percent; P < 0.001), physical function (repeated chair stands 20.1 percent, usual gait speed 19.3 percent, timed up-and-go 15.0 percent; P < 0.001), flexibility (chair sit and reach +2.9 cm; P < 0.001) and positive well-being (P = 0.014) following the exercise program.

CONCLUSION: A four-session exercise program significantly improved the muscular strength, exercise capacity, physical function and positive well-being of prostate cancer survivors. This short-duration exercise program is safe and feasible for prostate cancer survivors and a randomized controlled trial is now required to determine whether a similar individualized exercise regimen improves physical health and mental well-being over the short, medium and long term.

Keywords
allied health occupations; exercise therapy; neoplasms; physical conditioning; psychology
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4380 (URN)10.1111/ajco.12474 (DOI)000383582300006 ()26923217 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-14 Created: 2016-03-14 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Ekblom-Bak, E., Ekblom, Ö., Bolam, K., Ekblom, B., Bergström, G. & Börjesson, M. (2016). SCAPIS Pilot Study: Sitness, Fitness and Fatness - Is Sedentary Time Substitution by Physical Activity Equally Important for Everyone's Markers of Glucose Regulation?. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 13(7), 697-703
Open this publication in new window or tab >>SCAPIS Pilot Study: Sitness, Fitness and Fatness - Is Sedentary Time Substitution by Physical Activity Equally Important for Everyone's Markers of Glucose Regulation?
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health, ISSN 1543-3080, E-ISSN 1543-5474, Vol. 13, no 7, p. 697-703Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Although moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) is mainly recommended for glucose control, light physical activity (LIPA) may also have the potential to induce favorable changes. We investigated sedentary time (SED) substitution with equal time in LIPA and MVPA, and the association with markers of glucose regulation and insulin sensitivity after stratification by waist circumference, fitness and fasting glucose levels.

METHODS: A total of 654 men and women, 50-64 years, from the SCAPIS pilot study were included. Daily SED, LIPA and MVPA were assessed using hip-worn accelerometers. Fasting plasma glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR were determined.

RESULTS: Substituting 30 min of SED with LIPA was significantly associated with 3.0% lower fasting insulin values and 3.1% lower HOMA-IR values, with even lower levels when substituting SED with MVPA. Participants with lower fitness and participants with high fasting glucose levels benefited significantly more from substituting 30 min of SED with LIPA compared to participants with normal to high fitness levels and participants with normal glucose levels, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: LIPA, and not only MVPA, may have beneficial associations with glucose regulation. This is of great clinical and public health importance, not least because it may confer a higher compliance rate to regular PA.

Keywords
Isotemporal substitution, sedentary, light physical activity, moderate physical activity, insulin resistance
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4378 (URN)10.1123/jpah.2015-0611 (DOI)000381244300001 ()26900674 (PubMedID)
Projects
SCAPIS
Available from: 2016-03-14 Created: 2016-03-14 Last updated: 2018-04-26Bibliographically approved
Devin, J. L., Jenkins, D. G., Sax, A. T., Hughes, G. I., Aitken, J. F., Chambers, S. K., . . . Skinner, T. L. (2016). THE INFLUENCE OF EXERCISE INTENSITY AND FREQUENCY ON CARDIORESPIRATORY FITNESS AND BODY COMPOSITION IN COLORECTAL CANCER SURVIVORS: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL. Paper presented at COSA 2016 Annual Scientific Meeting, Clinical Oncology Society of Australia, Queensland 15-17 November 2016. Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, 12(S5), 109-109, Article ID 191.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>THE INFLUENCE OF EXERCISE INTENSITY AND FREQUENCY ON CARDIORESPIRATORY FITNESS AND BODY COMPOSITION IN COLORECTAL CANCER SURVIVORS: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
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2016 (English)In: Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 1743-7563, E-ISSN 1743-7563, Vol. 12, no S5, p. 109-109, article id 191Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4699 (URN)000387769900142 ()
Conference
COSA 2016 Annual Scientific Meeting, Clinical Oncology Society of Australia, Queensland 15-17 November 2016
Available from: 2017-01-11 Created: 2017-01-11 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Adlard, K. N., Bolam, K., Jenkins, D. G. & Skinner, T. L. (2016). The influence of exercise intensity on fatigue in adults: a systematic review. In: Research to Practice 2016: Conference Proceedings. Paper presented at Research to Practice 2016, Melbourne, 14-16 April (pp. 173). Exercise & Sports Science Australia
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The influence of exercise intensity on fatigue in adults: a systematic review
2016 (English)In: Research to Practice 2016: Conference Proceedings, Exercise & Sports Science Australia , 2016, p. 173-Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Exercise & Sports Science Australia, 2016
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4482 (URN)978-0-9925842-1-4 (ISBN)
Conference
Research to Practice 2016, Melbourne, 14-16 April
Available from: 2016-06-23 Created: 2016-06-23 Last updated: 2016-06-23Bibliographically approved
Adlard, K. N., Devin, J. L., Jenkins, D. G., Bolam, K. A., Aitken, J. F., Chambers, S. K., . . . Skinner, T. L. (2016). THE INFLUENCE OF EXERCISE INTENSITY ON FATIGUE IN COLORECTAL CANCER SURVIVORS: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL. Paper presented at COSA 2016 Annual Scientific Meeting, Clinical Oncology Society of Australia, Queensland 15-17 November 2016. Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, 12(S5), 78-78, Article ID 44.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>THE INFLUENCE OF EXERCISE INTENSITY ON FATIGUE IN COLORECTAL CANCER SURVIVORS: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
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2016 (English)In: Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 1743-7563, E-ISSN 1743-7563, Vol. 12, no S5, p. 78-78, article id 44Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4698 (URN)000387769900045 ()
Conference
COSA 2016 Annual Scientific Meeting, Clinical Oncology Society of Australia, Queensland 15-17 November 2016
Available from: 2017-01-11 Created: 2017-01-11 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Devin, J. L., Bolam, K. A., Jenkins, D. G. & Skinner, T. L. (2016). The influence of exercise on the insulin-like growth factor axis in oncology: physiological basis, current and future perspectives.. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, 25(2), 239-249
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The influence of exercise on the insulin-like growth factor axis in oncology: physiological basis, current and future perspectives.
2016 (English)In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 239-249Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Exercise and physical activity have been shown to reduce the risk of many common cancers and strongly influence tumour biology. A cause-effect mechanism explaining this relationship is dependent on cellular pathways that can influence tumour growth and are exercise-responsive. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis is reported to promote the development and progression of carcinomas through cellular signalling in cancerous tissues. This review summarises the physiological basis of the role of the IGF axis in oncology and the influence of exercise on this process. We examined the effects of exercise prescription on the IGF axis in cancer survivors by evaluating the current scope of the literature. The current research demonstrates a remarkable heterogeneity and inconsistency in the responses of the IGF axis to exercise in breast, prostate and colorectal cancer survivors. Finally, this review presents an in-depth exploration of the physiological basis and mechanistic underpinnings of the seemingly disparate relationship between exercise and the IGF axis in oncology. Whilst there is currently insufficient evidence to categorise the effects of exercise prescription on the IGF axis in cancer survivors, the inconsistency of results suggests a multifaceted relationship, the complexities of which are considered in this review.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4264 (URN)10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-15-0406 (DOI)000372173000003 ()26677213 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-12-18 Created: 2015-12-18 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5140-9098

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