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Paanalahti, M., Berzina, G., Lundgren-Nilsson, Å., Arndt, A. & Sunnerhagen, K. S. (2019). Examination of the relevance of the ICF cores set for stroke by comparing with the Stroke Impact Scale.. Disability and Rehabilitation, 41(5), 508-513
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Examination of the relevance of the ICF cores set for stroke by comparing with the Stroke Impact Scale.
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2019 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 508-513Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To examine if the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) core set for stoke contains problems that are relevant for the persons living with stroke as expressed in the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS).

METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 242 persons with previous stroke. The agreement between the perceived problems in the SIS items and problems in the categories of Comprehensive ICF Core Set for stroke were analyzed using percent of agreement and Kappa statistic.

RESULTS: The analyses between 57 items of the SIS and 31 second-level categories of the ICF were conducted. The problems in domains of "Mobility", "Activities of daily living", "Hand function", "Strength" in the SIS had moderate agreement when compared to ICF categories. The SIS domains of "Emotion" and "Communication", as well as some aspects of the "Memory" had slight or fair agreement with corresponding ICF categories. The results of the study suggest that there is acceptable agreement between persons after stroke and health professionals in the physical aspects, but rather poor agreement in the cognitive and emotional aspects of functioning.

CONCLUSIONS: Health professionals do not fully capture the magnitude of emotional or social problems experienced by persons after stroke when using the ICF Core Set as a framework for evaluation. Implications for Rehabilitation The ICF Core Set for Stroke provides comprehensive list of possible health and health related outcomes for persons after stroke. Problems reported in condition-specific patient-reported outcome scales can be important in decision making in rehabilitation. Patients and health professionals tend to agree more on physical than cognitive problems. Examination of the relevance of the ICF cores set for stroke by comparing with the Stroke Impact Scale.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health, Stroke, Stroke Impact Scale, core sets, perceptions
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5229 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2017.1396368 (DOI)000461520600002 ()29502463 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-16 Created: 2018-03-16 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved
Dias, C. P., Freire, B., Goulart, N. B., Dias De Castro, C., Lemos, F. D., Becker, J., . . . Vaz, M. A. (2019). Impaired mechanical properties of Achilles tendon in spastic stroke survivors: an observational study.. Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, 26(4), 261-266
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impaired mechanical properties of Achilles tendon in spastic stroke survivors: an observational study.
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2019 (English)In: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, ISSN 1074-9357, E-ISSN 1945-5119, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 261-266Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The spasticity could lead to decreased functional capacity and changes in musculoskeletal tissue.

OBJECTIVE: To compare the Achilles tendon properties between the affected and contralateral limbs of participants with spasticity due to stroke and the healthy subjects.

METHODS: Fifteen individuals with ankle spasticity due to stroke and 15 healthy subjects were recruited. Maximal isometric ankle joint torque was obtained with an isokinetic dynamometer, and an ultrasound was used to determine tendon length, tendon cross-sectional area, and the medial gastrocnemius myotendinous junction displacement. The Achilles tendon strength, displacement, stress, strain, stiffness, and Young's modulus were obtained during a maximum voluntary isometric plantarflexion contraction.

RESULTS: There were no differences between Achilles tendon length among participants. Both limbs of participants with stroke showed reduced tendon cross-sectional area (~18%) compared to healthy limb. The affected limb showed decreased tendon strength (686 ± 293.3 N), displacement (10.6 ± 1.7 mm), Young's modulus values (849 ± 235.6 MPa), and lower stiffness (196.6 ± 67.6 N/mm) compared to the contralateral limb (strength, 1357.1 ± 294.8 N; displacement, 15.2 ± 5.5 mm; Young's modulus, 1431.8 ± 301.9 MPa; stiffness, 337.5 ± 98.1 N/mm) and to the healthy limb. The contralateral limb also showed decreased tendon strength (~26.2%) and stiffness (~21.5%) compared to the healthy group.

CONCLUSION: There is a decrement in Achilles tendon morphological and mechanical properties of the affected limb in individuals with spasticity due to stroke. The contralateral limb had a thinner tendon more compliant likely to physical activity reduction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Muscle spasticity, elasticity imaging technique, muscle strength, paresis, tendons
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5664 (URN)10.1080/10749357.2019.1591688 (DOI)000461938700001 ()30890042 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-22 Created: 2019-03-22 Last updated: 2019-08-14Bibliographically approved
Sandamas, P., Gutierrez-Farewik, E. M. & Arndt, A. (2019). The effect of a reduced first step width on starting block and first stance power and impulses during an athletic sprint start.. Journal of Sports Sciences, 37(9), 1046-1054
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of a reduced first step width on starting block and first stance power and impulses during an athletic sprint start.
2019 (English)In: Journal of Sports Sciences, ISSN 0264-0414, E-ISSN 1466-447X, Vol. 37, no 9, p. 1046-1054Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated how manipulating first step width affects 3D external force production, centre of mass (CoM) motion and performance in athletic sprinting. Eight male and 2 female competitive sprinters (100m PB: 11.03 ± 0.36 s male and 11.6 ± 0.45 s female) performed 10 maximal effort block starts. External force and three-dimensional kinematics were recorded in both the block and first stance phases. Five trials were performed with the athletes performing their preferred technique (Skating) and five trials with the athletes running inside a 0.3 m lane (Narrow). By reducing step width from a mean of 0.31 ± 0.06 m (Skating) to 0.19 ± 0.03 m (Narrow), reductions were found between the two styles in medial block and medial 1st stance impulses, 1st stance anterior toe-off velocity and mediolateral motion of the CoM. No differences were found in block time, step length, stance time, average net resultant force vector, net anteroposterior impulse nor normalised external power. Step width correlated positively with medial impulse but not with braking nor net anteroposterior impulse. Despite less medially directed forces and less mediolateral motion of the CoM in the Narrow trials, no immediate improvement to performance was found by restricting step width.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
CoM motion, Sprinting, external power, foot placement, impulse
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5479 (URN)10.1080/02640414.2018.1541161 (DOI)000463112500011 ()30460879 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-11-26 Created: 2018-11-26 Last updated: 2019-04-23
Spiegl, O., Tarassova, O. & Arndt, A. (2019). The effects of new Edea and Graf figure skating boots and used Graf boots on the kinetics and kinematics of landing after simulated on-ice jumps. Footwear Science, 11(2), 121-129
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of new Edea and Graf figure skating boots and used Graf boots on the kinetics and kinematics of landing after simulated on-ice jumps
2019 (English)In: Footwear Science, ISSN 1942-4280, E-ISSN 1942-4299, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 121-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An increase in training intensity and the number of active participants and competitors in figure skating has been accompanied by an increasing frequency of injuries. The aim of this study was to investigate whether different brands of skates as well as the usage of the skates modify the kinetics and kinematics of the landing impact from a jump. New Graf Edmonton (NG), old used Graf Edmonton (OG) and new Edea Concerto (NE) skates were compared. Twelve participants completed six jump trials from 30 cm and 50 cm high boxes, respectively in all three skates and landed on a section of artificial ice placed on a laboratory floor. Landing kinematics (Oqus4 system, Qualisys, Sweden) and kinetics (force plate: Kistler, Switzerland; insoles: Pedar, Novel, Germany) were examined. Each participant acted as their own control for statistical comparison between the skates. The results confirmed that the kinetics and kinematics of the landing are affected by wearing different skates. During landing impacts in NG, participants had significantly greater dorsiflexion at initial contact (IC) and peak dorsiflexion of the ankle, peak flexion of the knee and also greater in-skate plantar forces (PF) than in NE, which may increase the risk of injury. In OG, participants had significantly greater peak flexion of knee and longer time from IC to first peak dorsiflexion (TP) of the ankle than in NG. The differences observed may be due to the different construction designs, such as height of the heel, used materials, and stiffness of the skates, which may affect injury occurrence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Figure skating boots, jump landing, landing impact, kinetics, kinematics
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5801 (URN)10.1080/19424280.2018.1539126 (DOI)000470064200006 ()
Available from: 2019-08-13 Created: 2019-08-13 Last updated: 2019-08-13
Rosén, J. S., Arndt, A., Goosey-Tolfrey, V. L., Mason, B. S., Hutchinson, M. J., Tarassova, O. & Bjerkefors, A. (2019). The impact of impairment on kinematic and kinetic variables in Va'a paddling: Towards a sport-specific evidence-based classification system for Para Va'a.. Journal of Sports Sciences, 37(17), 1942-1950
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of impairment on kinematic and kinetic variables in Va'a paddling: Towards a sport-specific evidence-based classification system for Para Va'a.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Sports Sciences, ISSN 0264-0414, E-ISSN 1466-447X, Vol. 37, no 17, p. 1942-1950Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Para Va'a is a new Paralympic sport in which athletes with trunk and/or leg impairment compete over 200 m. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of impairment on kinematic and kinetic variables during Va'a ergometer paddling. Ten able-bodied and 44 Para Va'a athletes with impairments affecting: trunk and legs (TL), legs bilaterally (BL) or leg unilaterally (UL) participated. Differences in stroke frequency, mean paddling force, and joint angles and correlation of the joint angles with paddling force were examined. Able-bodied demonstrated significantly greater paddling force as well as knee and ankle flexion ranges of movement (ROM) on the top hand paddling side compared to TL, BL and UL. Able-bodied, BL and UL demonstrated greater paddling force and trunk flexion compared to TL, and UL demonstrated larger bottom hand paddling side knee and ankle flexion ROM compared to BL. Significant positive correlations were observed for both male and female athletes between paddling force and all trunk flexion angles and ROM in the trunk and pelvis rotation and bottom hand paddling side hip, knee and ankle flexion. The results of this study are important for creating an evidence-based classification system for Para Va'a.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Outrigger, disability, paddling force, paralympics
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5717 (URN)10.1080/02640414.2019.1606763 (DOI)000470359400001 ()31006343 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-04-23 Created: 2019-04-23 Last updated: 2019-08-13
Bjerkefors, A., Rosén, J. S., Tarassova, O. & Arndt, A. (2019). Three-Dimensional Kinematics and Power Output in Elite Para-Kayakers and Elite Able-Bodied Flat-Water Kayakers.. Journal of Applied Biomechanics, 93-100
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Three-Dimensional Kinematics and Power Output in Elite Para-Kayakers and Elite Able-Bodied Flat-Water Kayakers.
2019 (English)In: Journal of Applied Biomechanics, ISSN 1065-8483, E-ISSN 1543-2688, p. 93-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Trunk, pelvis and leg movement are important for performance in sprint kayaking. Para-kayaking is a new Paralympic sport in which athletes with trunk and/or leg impairment compete in three classification groups. The purpose of this study was to identify how physical impairments impact on performance by examining: differences in three-dimensional joint range of motion (RoM) between 10 (4 females, 6 males) elite able-bodied kayakers and 41 (13 females, 28 males) elite para-kayakersfrom the three classification groups, and which joint angles were correlated with power output during high intensity kayak ergometer paddling. There were significant differences in RoM between the able-bodied kayakers and the three para-kayak groups for the shoulders (flexion, rotation: able-bodied kayakers<para-kayakers), trunk and pelvis (rotation: able-bodied kayakers>para-kayakers) and legs (hip, knee, ankle flexion: able-bodied kayakers>para-kayakers) during paddling. Furthermore, athletes with greater impairment exhibited lower trunk and leg RoM compared to those with less impairment. Significant positive correlations were observed for both males and females between power output and peak shoulder and trunk flexion, trunk and pelvis rotation RoM and hip, knee and ankle flexion RoM. This information is important for understanding how key kinematic and kinetic variables for para-kayaking performance vary between athletes from different classification groups.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Human Kinetics, 2019
Keywords
3D analysis, Paralympics, canoe, disability, ergometer, kinetics
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5432 (URN)10.1123/jab.2017-0102 (DOI)000461017800001 ()30300050 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-10-16 Created: 2018-10-16 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved
Zhou, G.-Q., Zhang, Y., Wang, R.-L., Zhou, P., Zheng, Y.-P., Tarassova, O., . . . Chen, Q. (2018). Automatic Myotendinous Junction Tracking in Ultrasound Images with Phase-Based Segmentation.. BioMed Research International, Article ID 3697835.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Automatic Myotendinous Junction Tracking in Ultrasound Images with Phase-Based Segmentation.
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2018 (English)In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, article id 3697835Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Displacement of the myotendinous junction (MTJ) obtained by ultrasound imaging is crucial to quantify the interactive length changes of muscles and tendons for understanding the mechanics and pathological conditions of the muscle-tendon unit during motion. However, the lack of a reliable automatic measurement method restricts its application in human motion analysis. This paper presents an automated measurement of MTJ displacement using prior knowledge on tendinous tissues and MTJ, precluding the influence of nontendinous components on the estimation of MTJ displacement. It is based on the perception of tendinous features from musculoskeletal ultrasound images using Radon transform and thresholding methods, with information about the symmetric measures obtained from phase congruency. The displacement of MTJ is achieved by tracking manually marked points on tendinous tissues with the Lucas-Kanade optical flow algorithm applied over the segmented MTJ region. The performance of this method was evaluated on ultrasound images of the gastrocnemius obtained from 10 healthy subjects (26.0±2.9 years of age). Waveform similarity between the manual and automatic measurements was assessed by calculating the overall similarity with the coefficient of multiple correlation (CMC).<italic> In vivo</italic> experiments demonstrated that MTJ tracking with the proposed method (CMC = 0.97±0.02) was more consistent with the manual measurements than existing optical flow tracking methods (CMC = 0.79±0.11). This study demonstrated that the proposed method was robust to the interference of nontendinous components, resulting in a more reliable measurement of MTJ displacement, which may facilitate further research and applications related to the architectural change of muscles and tendons. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Limited, 2018
Keywords
Surgetendon Ry, Calf Muscles, Surgery, Algorithms, Automation, Correlation (Statistics), Dislocations (Anatomy), Tendons, Ultrasonic Imaging, Wave Analysis, Computer-Assisted Surgery, In Vivo Studies
National Category
Medical Laboratory and Measurements Technologies
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5234 (URN)10.1155/2018/3697835 (DOI)000427851400001 ()29750152 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-28 Created: 2018-03-28 Last updated: 2018-10-15
Fischer, K. M., Willwacher, S., Arndt, A. & Brüggemann, G.-P. (2018). Calcaneal adduction and eversion are coupled to talus and tibial rotation.. Journal of Anatomy, 233(1), 64-72
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Calcaneal adduction and eversion are coupled to talus and tibial rotation.
2018 (English)In: Journal of Anatomy, ISSN 0021-8782, E-ISSN 1469-7580, Vol. 233, no 1, p. 64-72Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to quantify isolated coupling mechanisms of calcaneal adduction/abduction and calcaneal eversion/inversion to proximal bones in vitro. The in vitro approach is necessary because in vivo both movements appear together, making it impossible to determine the extent of their individual contribution to overall ankle joint coupling. Eight fresh frozen foot-leg specimens were tested. Data describing bone orientation and coupling mechanisms between segments were obtained using bone pin marker triads. The bone movement was described in a global coordinate system to examine the coupling between the calcaneus, talus and tibia. The strength of coupling was determined by means of the slope of a linear least squares fit to an angle-angle plot. The coupling coefficients in the present study indicate that not only calcaneal eversion/inversion (coupling coefficient: 0.68 ± 0.15) but to an even greater extent calcaneal adduction/abduction (coupling coefficient: 0.99 ± 0.10) was transferred into talus and tibial rotation, highlighting the relevance of calcaneal adduction for the overall ankle joint coupling. The results of this study present the possibility that controlling calcaneal adduction/abduction can affect talus and tibial rotation and therefore the possible genesis of overuse knee injuries.

Keywords
ankle joint, locomotion, movement coupling, overuse injury
National Category
Neurosciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5232 (URN)10.1111/joa.12813 (DOI)000434275300006 ()29582433 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-28 Created: 2018-03-28 Last updated: 2018-06-25Bibliographically approved
da Silva, J. C., Ekblom, M., Tarassova, O., Andersson, E., Rönquist, G., Grundström, H. & Arndt, A. (2018). Effect of increasing workload on knee extensor and flexor muscular activity during cycling as measured with intramuscular electromyography.. PLoS ONE, 13(8), Article ID e0201014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of increasing workload on knee extensor and flexor muscular activity during cycling as measured with intramuscular electromyography.
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2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 8, article id e0201014Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to describe the effect of increasing workload on individual thigh muscle activation during a 20 minute incremental cycling test. Intramuscular electromyographic signals were recorded from the knee extensors rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, vastus medialis and vastus intermedius and the knee flexors semimembranosus, semitendinosus, and the short and long heads of the biceps femoris during increasing workloads. Mean activation levels were compared over the whole pedaling cycle and the crank angles at which onset and offset of activation and peak activity occurred were identified for each muscle. These data were compared between three workloads. EMG activation level significantly increased (p<0.05) with increasing workload in the rectus femoris, vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, vastus intermedius, biceps femoris long head, semitendinosus and semimembranosus but not in the biceps femoris short head. A significant change in activation timing was found for the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, vastus medialis and semitendinosus. Of the knee flexors only the short head of the biceps femoris had its peak activity during the upstroke phase at the two highest workloads indicating a unique contribution to knee flexion.

National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5379 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0201014 (DOI)000440778600023 ()30071032 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-20 Created: 2018-08-20 Last updated: 2018-09-04
Peter, A., Andersson, E., Arndt, A., Finni, T. & Cronin, N. (2018). Impact of footwear type and walking speed on ankle plantar flexor fine-wire electromyographic activity. In: Sport science at the cutting edge: . Paper presented at 23rd Annual Congress of the ECSS - European College of Sports Medicine, Dublin, Ireland, 4-7 July 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of footwear type and walking speed on ankle plantar flexor fine-wire electromyographic activity
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2018 (English)In: Sport science at the cutting edge, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION:

Ankle plantar flexors substantially contribute to propulsion in human walking, and their relative contributions may be affected by the type of footwear used. In this study, we aimed to examine plantar flexor fine-wire electromyography (wEMG) activity in different footwear types and barefoot walking. We further examined the effect of walking speed on the relative activity of ankle plantar flexors.

METHODS:

Nine healthy people volunteered to this study (five males) with two sessions. In session 1, participants were familiarized to the study protocol. In session 2, electrical activity of flexor hallucis longus (FHL), soleus (SOL), medial and lateral gastrocnemius (MG and LG) muscles were measured with wEMG during eight overground walking tasks: preferred speed walking with shoes, barefoot and with flip-flops; with shoes: 30% slower and faster than preferred speed walking with shoes, and maximum walking speed; walking barefoot and with flip-flops at the same speed as preferred speed walking with shoes (matched speed). Then they performed maximal isometric plantar flexion contractions and maximal big toe flexions superimposed on ankle plantar flexion (MVICs) in an isokinetic dynamometer for wEMG normalization. Root mean square activity was calculated in the push-off phase of individual step cycles based on ground reaction force data. The relative contribution of each muscle to propulsion was calculated as: (mean RMS value %MVIC of the given muscle / mean RMS value %MVIC of all muscles) * 100. Cohen’s d±90% confidence intervals were calculated to define the magnitude of differences.

RESULTS:

In all muscles, wEMG activity increased with speed. With increasing speed the relative contribution to propulsion increased in FHL (from 19 to 22%), did not change in SOL (32%), decreased in MG (from 32 to 25%) and increased in LG (from 18 to 21%). There were no differences between preferred and matched barefoot walking speed or wEMG activity level (d range = 0.06-0.17). wEMG activity for all muscles was lower during matched barefoot walking than preferred speed walking with shoes (7-10% MVIC, d range=0.31-0.47). Flip-flop data are under analysis.

CONCLUSION:

We found that relative wEMG activity of the examined muscles was affected by speed and absence or presence of shoes. During barefoot walking, wEMG activity of plantar flexor muscles was lower than during shod walking at the same speed, which presumably means that shod walking limits the contribution of intrinsic foot muscles to propulsion, which should be further examined.

REFERENCES:

1 Murley GS, Menz HB, Landorf KB. (2014). Gait & Posture, 39(4), 1080-5.

2 Goldmann JP, Potthast W, Brüggemann GP. (2013). Footwear Sci, 5 (1): 19-25.

3 Franklin et al., Gait & Posture. 60: 1-5, 2018.

CONTACT:

annamaria.a.peter@jyu.fi

National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5557 (URN)
Conference
23rd Annual Congress of the ECSS - European College of Sports Medicine, Dublin, Ireland, 4-7 July 2018
Available from: 2019-01-20 Created: 2019-01-20 Last updated: 2019-01-21Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1210-6449

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