Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH

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Edman, S., Flockhart, M., Larsen, F. J. & Apro, W. (2024). Need for Speed: Human fast-twitch mitochondria favor power over efficiency.. Molecular Metabolism, 79, Article ID 101854.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Need for Speed: Human fast-twitch mitochondria favor power over efficiency.
2024 (English)In: Molecular Metabolism, ISSN 2212-8778, Vol. 79, article id 101854Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Human skeletal muscle consists of a mixture of slow- and fast-twitch fibers with distinct capacities for contraction mechanics, fermentation, and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). While the divergence in mitochondrial volume favoring slow-twitch fibers is well established, data on the fiber type-specific intrinsic mitochondrial function and morphology are highly limited with existing data mainly being generated in animal models. This highlights the need for more human data on the topic.

METHODS: Here, we utilized THRIFTY, a rapid fiber type identification protocol to detect, sort, and pool fast- and slow-twitch fibers within six hours of muscle biopsy sampling. Respiration of permeabilized fast- and slow-twitch fiber pools was then analyzed with high-resolution respirometry. Using standardized western blot procedures, muscle fiber pools were subsequently analyzed for control proteins and key proteins related to respiratory capacity.

RESULTS: Maximal complex I CI+II respiration was 25% higher in human slow-twitch fibers compared to fast-twitch fibers. However, per volume, the respiratory rate of mitochondria in fast-twitch fibers was approximately 50% higher for CI+II, which was primarily mediated through elevated CII respiration, but not CI or. Furthermore, the abundance of CII protein and proteins regulating cristae structure were disproportionally elevated in mitochondria of the fast-twitch fibers. The difference in intrinsic respiratory rate was not reflected in fatty acid- or complex I respiration.

CONCLUSION: Mitochondria of human fast-twitch muscle fibers compensate for their lack of volume by substantially elevating intrinsic respiratory rate through increased reliance on complex II.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
National Category
Physiology Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-8000 (URN)10.1016/j.molmet.2023.101854 (DOI)001147759100001 ()38104652 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-12-20 Created: 2023-12-20 Last updated: 2024-02-22
Regan, C., Heiland, E. G., Ekblom, Ö., Tarassova, O., Kjellenberg, K., Larsen, F. J., . . . Helgadóttir, B. (2023). Acute effects of nitrate and breakfast on working memory, cerebral blood flow, arterial stiffness, and psychological factors in adolescents: Study protocol for a randomised crossover trial.. PLOS ONE, 18(5), Article ID e0285581.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute effects of nitrate and breakfast on working memory, cerebral blood flow, arterial stiffness, and psychological factors in adolescents: Study protocol for a randomised crossover trial.
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2023 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 5, article id e0285581Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Inorganic nitrate has been shown to acutely improve working memory in adults, potentially by altering cerebral and peripheral vasculature. However, this remains unknown in adolescents. Furthermore, breakfast is important for overall health and psychological well-being. Therefore, this study will investigate the acute effects of nitrate and breakfast on working memory performance, task-related cerebral blood flow (CBF), arterial stiffness, and psychological outcomes in Swedish adolescents.

METHODS: This randomised crossover trial will recruit at least 43 adolescents (13-15 years old). There will be three experimental breakfast conditions: (1) none, (2) low-nitrate (normal breakfast), and (3) high-nitrate (concentrated beetroot juice with normal breakfast). Working memory (n-back tests), CBF (task-related changes in oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin in the prefrontal cortex), and arterial stiffness (pulse wave velocity and augmentation index) will be measured twice, immediately after breakfast and 130 min later. Measures of psychological factors and salivary nitrate/nitrite will be assessed once before the conditions and at two-time points after the conditions.

DISCUSSION: This study will provide insight into the acute effects of nitrate and breakfast on working memory in adolescents and to what extent any such effects can be explained by changes in CBF. This study will also shed light upon whether oral intake of nitrate may acutely improve arterial stiffness and psychological well-being, in adolescents. Consequently, results will indicate if nitrate intake from beetroot juice or if breakfast itself could acutely improve cognitive, vascular, and psychological health in adolescents, which can affect academic performance and have implications for policies regarding school meals.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial has been prospectively registered on 21/02/2022 at https://doi.org/10.1186/ISRCTN16596056. Trial number: ISRCTN16596056.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2023
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7653 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0285581 (DOI)001050599900048 ()37205681 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20180040
Note

This project is supported by The Knowledge Foundation https://www.kks.se/ (20180040; ÖE, GN), and the following companies: COOP Sverige, IKEA, Skandia, Skanska, Generation Pep, and Konsumentföreningen Stockholm.

Available from: 2023-06-20 Created: 2023-06-20 Last updated: 2024-01-26
Flockhart, M. & Larsen, F. J. (2023). Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Endurance Athletes: Interpretation and Relevance of Measurements for Improving Performance and Health.. Sports Medicine
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Endurance Athletes: Interpretation and Relevance of Measurements for Improving Performance and Health.
2023 (English)In: Sports Medicine, ISSN 0112-1642, E-ISSN 1179-2035Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Blood glucose regulation has been studied for well over a century as it is intimately related to metabolic health. Research in glucose transport and uptake has also been substantial within the field of exercise physiology as glucose delivery to the working muscles affects exercise capacity and athletic achievements. However, although exceptions exist, less focus has been on blood glucose as a parameter to optimize training and competition outcomes in athletes with normal glucose control. During the last years, measuring glucose has gained popularity within the sports community and successful endurance athletes have been seen with skin-mounted sensors for continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). The technique offers real-time recording of glucose concentrations in the interstitium, which is assumed to be equivalent to concentrations in the blood. Although continuous measurements of a parameter that is intimately connected to metabolism and health can seem appealing, there is no current consensus on how to interpret measurements within this context. Well-defined approaches to use glucose monitoring to improve endurance athletes' performance and health are lacking. In several studies, blood glucose regulation in endurance athletes has been shown to differ from that in healthy controls. Furthermore, endurance athletes regularly perform demanding training sessions and can be exposed to high or low energy and/or carbohydrate availability, which can affect blood glucose levels and regulation. In this current opinion, we aim to discuss blood glucose regulation in endurance athletes and highlight the existing research on glucose monitoring for performance and health in this population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7790 (URN)10.1007/s40279-023-01910-4 (DOI)001057649200002 ()37658967 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-09-14 Created: 2023-09-14 Last updated: 2023-10-05
Flockhart, M., Nilsson, L., Tillqvist, E. N., Vinge, F., Millbert, F., Lännerström, J., . . . Larsen, F. J. (2023). Glucosinolate-rich broccoli sprouts protect against oxidative stress and improve adaptations to intense exercise training.. Redox Biology, 67, Article ID 102873.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Glucosinolate-rich broccoli sprouts protect against oxidative stress and improve adaptations to intense exercise training.
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2023 (English)In: Redox Biology, E-ISSN 2213-2317, Vol. 67, article id 102873Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Oxidative stress plays a vital role for the adaptive responses to physical training. However, excessive oxidative stress can precipitate cellular damage, necessitating protective mechanisms to mitigate this effect. Glucosinolates, found predominantly in cruciferous vegetables, can be converted into isothiocyanates, known for their antioxidative properties. These compounds activate crucial antioxidant defence pathways and support mitochondrial function and protein integrity under oxidative stress, in both Nrf2-dependent and independent manners. We here administered glucosinolate-rich broccoli sprouts (GRS), in a randomized double-blinded cross-over fashion to 9 healthy subjects in combination with daily intense exercise training for 7 days. We found that exercise in combination with GRS significantly decreased the levels of carbonylated proteins in skeletal muscle and the release of myeloperoxidase into blood. Moreover, it lowered lactate accumulation during submaximal exercise, and attenuated the severe nocturnal hypoglycaemic episodes seen during the placebo condition. Furthermore, GRS in combination with exercise improved physical performance, which was unchanged in the placebo condition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7791 (URN)10.1016/j.redox.2023.102873 (DOI)001074895800001 ()37688976 (PubMedID)
Funder
Ekhaga FoundationSwedish National Centre for Research in Sports
Note

This study was funded by grants from Ekhagastiftelsen, Swedish Research Council for Sport Science and Sydgrönt Ekonomisk Förening.

Available from: 2023-09-14 Created: 2023-09-14 Last updated: 2024-01-04
Blackwood, S. J., Horwath, O., Moberg, M., Pontén, M., Apro, W., Ekblom, M., . . . Katz, A. (2023). Insulin resistance after a 3-day fast is associated with an increased capacity of skeletal muscle to oxidize lipids.. American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, 324(5), E390-E401
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Insulin resistance after a 3-day fast is associated with an increased capacity of skeletal muscle to oxidize lipids.
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2023 (English)In: American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0193-1849, E-ISSN 1522-1555, Vol. 324, no 5, p. E390-E401Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a debate on whether lipid-mediated insulin resistance derives from an increased or decreased capacity of muscle to oxidize fats. Here we examine the involvement of muscle fiber composition in the metabolic responses to a 3-day fast (starvation, which results in increases in plasma lipids and insulin resistance) in two groups of healthy young subjects: 1, area occupied by type I fibers = 61.0 ± 11.8%; 2, type I area = 36.0 ± 4.9% (P<0.001). Muscle biopsies and intravenous glucose tolerance tests were performed after an overnight fast and after starvation. Biopsies were analyzed for muscle fiber composition and mitochondrial respiration. Indices of glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were determined. Glucose tolerance was similar in both groups after an overnight fast and deteriorated to a similar degree in both groups after starvation. In contrast, whole-body insulin sensitivity decreased markedly after starvation in group 1 (P<0.01), whereas the decrease in group 2 was substantially smaller (P=0.06). Non-esterified fatty acids and β-hydroxybutyrate levels in plasma after an overnight fast were similar between groups and increased markedly and comparably in both groups after starvation, demonstrating similar degrees of lipid load. The capacity of permeabilized muscle fibers to oxidize lipids was significantly higher in group 1 vs. 2, whereas there was no significant difference in pyruvate oxidation between groups. The data demonstrate that loss of whole-body insulin sensitivity after short-term starvation is a function of muscle fiber composition and is associated with an elevated rather than a diminished capacity of muscle to oxidize lipids.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Physiological Society, 2023
Keywords
glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, mitochondrial respiration, muscle fiber composition, starvation
National Category
Physiology Endocrinology and Diabetes
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7521 (URN)10.1152/ajpendo.00317.2022 (DOI)000974241700002 ()36791323 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-03-03 Created: 2023-03-03 Last updated: 2024-01-11
Flockhart, M., Tischer, D., Nilsson, L. C., Blackwood, S. J., Ekblom, B., Katz, A., . . . Larsen, F. J. (2023). Reduced glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity after prolonged exercise in endurance athletes.. Acta Physiologica, 238(4), Article ID e13972.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reduced glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity after prolonged exercise in endurance athletes.
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2023 (English)In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 238, no 4, article id e13972Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: The purpose of this study was to 1. investigate if glucose tolerance is affected after one acute bout of different types of exercise; 2. assess if potential differences between two exercise paradigms are related to changes in mitochondrial function; and 3. determine if endurance athletes differ from nonendurance-trained controls in their metabolic responses to the exercise paradigms.

METHODS: Nine endurance athletes (END) and eight healthy nonendurance-trained controls (CON) were studied. Oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) and mitochondrial function were assessed on three occasions: in the morning, 14 h after an overnight fast without prior exercise (RE), as well as after 3 h of prolonged continuous exercise at 65% of VO2 max (PE) or 5 × 4 min at ~95% of VO2 max (HIIT) on a cycle ergometer.

RESULTS: Glucose tolerance was markedly reduced in END after PE compared with RE. END also exhibited elevated fasting serum FFA and ketones levels, reduced insulin sensitivity and glucose oxidation, and increased fat oxidation during the OGTT. CON showed insignificant changes in glucose tolerance and the aforementioned measurements compared with RE. HIIT did not alter glucose tolerance in either group. Neither PE nor HIIT affected mitochondrial function in either group. END also exhibited increased activity of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity in muscle extracts vs. CON.

CONCLUSION: Prolonged exercise reduces glucose tolerance and increases insulin resistance in endurance athletes the following day. These findings are associated with an increased lipid load, a high capacity to oxidize lipids, and increased fat oxidation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
endurance athletes, endurance exercise, glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, mitochondria, reactive oxygen species
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Endocrinology and Diabetes
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7627 (URN)10.1111/apha.13972 (DOI)000972308100001 ()37017615 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, P2017-0067, P2018-0083, P2019-0062, P2020-0061
Note

At the time of Mikael Flockhart's dissertation, this article was a submitted manuscript.

Available from: 2023-05-08 Created: 2023-05-08 Last updated: 2023-08-29
Lundberg, J. O., Schiffer, T., Weitzberg, E. & Larsen, F. J. (2023). The Tortoise and the Hare.. Trends in endocrinology and metabolism, 34(6), 317-318
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Tortoise and the Hare.
2023 (English)In: Trends in endocrinology and metabolism, ISSN 1043-2760, E-ISSN 1879-3061, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 317-318Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Distance running requires a high absolute oxygen consumption, while for a breath-hold diver the opposite is preferable. We compared physiological exercise parameters and mitochondrial function in a competitive triathlete with those seen in an accomplished breath-hold diver and notice some remarkable differences, possibly explaining why both have become successful.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
basal metabolic rate, exercise, mitochondria, oxygen conspumption
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Physiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7636 (URN)10.1016/j.tem.2023.03.003 (DOI)001001828900001 ()37062666 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-05-12 Created: 2023-05-12 Last updated: 2023-06-27
Flockhart, M., Nilsson, L. C., Ekblom, B. & Larsen, F. J. (2022). A simple model for diagnosis of maladaptations to exercise training. Sports Medicine Open, 8(1), Article ID 136.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A simple model for diagnosis of maladaptations to exercise training
2022 (English)In: Sports Medicine Open, E-ISSN 2198-9761, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 136Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The concept of overreaching and super compensation is widely in use by athletes and coaches seeking to maximize performance and adaptations to exercise training. The physiological aspects of acute fatigue, overreaching and non-functional overreaching are, however, not well understood, and well-defined negative physiological outcomes are missing. Instead, the concept relies heavily on performance outcomes for differentiating between the states. Recent advancements in the field of integrated exercise physiology have associated maladaptations in muscular oxidative function to high loads of exercise training.

Method: Eleven female and male subjects that exercised regularly but did not engage in high-intensity interval training (HIIT) were recruited to a 4-week long training intervention where the responses to different training loads were studied. Highly monitored HIIT sessions were performed on a cycle ergometer in a progressive fashion with the intent to accomplish a training overload. Throughout the intervention, physiological and psychological responses to HIIT were assessed, and the results were used to construct a diagnostic model that could indicate maladaptations during excessive training loads.

Results: We here use mitochondrial function as an early marker of excessive training loads and show the dynamic responses of several physiological and psychological measurements during different training loads. During HIIT, a loss of mitochondrial function was associated with reduced glycolytic, glucoregulatory and heart rate responses and increased ratings of perceived exertion in relation to several physiological measurements. The profile of mood states was highly affected after excessive training loads, whereas performance staled rather than decreased. By implementing five of the most affected and relevant measured parameters in a diagnostic model, we could successfully, and in all the subjects, identify the training loads that lead to maladaptations.

Conclusions: As mitochondrial parameters cannot be assessed without donating a muscle biopsy, this test can be used by coaches and exercise physiologists to monitor adaptation to exercise training for improving performance and optimizing the health benefits of exercise. Clinical trial registry number NCT04753021 . Retrospectively registered 2021-02-12.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2022
Keywords
Exercise; Maladaptations; Mitochondria; Overreaching; Performance; Physiology; Testing.
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7117 (URN)10.1186/s40798-022-00523-x (DOI)36333619 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, P2020-0061
Note

At the time of Mikael Flockhart's dissertation this manuscript was submitted.

Available from: 2022-08-24 Created: 2022-08-24 Last updated: 2023-01-09
Shannon, O. M., Allen, J. D., Bescos, R., Burke, L., Clifford, T., Easton, C., . . . Porcelli, S. (2022). Dietary Inorganic Nitrate as an Ergogenic Aid: An Expert Consensus Derived via the Modified Delphi Technique.. Sports Medicine, 52(10), 2537-2558
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dietary Inorganic Nitrate as an Ergogenic Aid: An Expert Consensus Derived via the Modified Delphi Technique.
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2022 (English)In: Sports Medicine, ISSN 0112-1642, E-ISSN 1179-2035, Vol. 52, no 10, p. 2537-2558Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Dietary inorganic nitrate is a popular nutritional supplement, which increases nitric oxide bioavailability and may improve exercise performance. Despite over a decade of research into the effects of dietary nitrate supplementation during exercise there is currently no expert consensus on how, when and for whom this compound could be recommended as an ergogenic aid. Moreover, there is no consensus on the safe administration of dietary nitrate as an ergogenic aid. This study aimed to address these research gaps.

METHODS: The modified Delphi technique was used to establish the views of 12 expert panel members on the use of dietary nitrate as an ergogenic aid. Over three iterative rounds (two via questionnaire and one via videoconferencing), the expert panel members voted on 222 statements relating to dietary nitrate as an ergogenic aid. Consensus was reached when > 80% of the panel provided the same answer (i.e. yes or no). Statements for which > 80% of the panel cast a vote of insufficient evidence were categorised as such and removed from further voting. These statements were subsequently used to identify directions for future research.

RESULTS: The 12 panel members contributed to voting in all three rounds. A total of 39 statements (17.6%) reached consensus across the three rounds (20 yes, 19 no). In round one, 21 statements reached consensus (11 yes, 10 no). In round two, seven further statements reached consensus (4 yes, 3 no). In round three, an additional 11 statements reached consensus (5 yes, 6 no). The panel agreed that there was insufficient evidence for 134 (60.4%) of the statements, and were unable to agree on the outcome of the remaining statements.

CONCLUSIONS: This study provides information on the current expert consensus on dietary nitrate, which may be of value to athletes, coaches, practitioners and researchers. The effects of dietary nitrate appear to be diminished in individuals with a higher aerobic fitness (peak oxygen consumption [V̇O2peak] > 60 ml/kg/min), and therefore, aerobic fitness should be taken into account when considering use of dietary nitrate as an ergogenic aid. It is recommended that athletes looking to benefit from dietary nitrate supplementation should consume 8-16 mmol nitrate acutely or 4-16 mmol/day nitrate chronically (with the final dose ingested 2-4 h pre-exercise) to maximise ergogenic effects, taking into consideration that, from a safety perspective, athletes may be best advised to increase their intake of nitrate via vegetables and vegetable juices. Acute nitrate supplementation up to ~ 16 mmol is believed to be safe, although the safety of chronic nitrate supplementation requires further investigation. The expert panel agreed that there was insufficient evidence for most of the appraised statements, highlighting the need for future research in this area.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2022
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7086 (URN)10.1007/s40279-022-01701-3 (DOI)000800961700001 ()35604567 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-06-28 Created: 2022-06-28 Last updated: 2022-12-06
Blackwood, S. J., Horwath, O., Moberg, M., Pontén, M., Apro, W., Ekblom, M., . . . Katz, A. (2022). Extreme Variations in Muscle Fiber Composition Enable Detection of Insulin Resistance and Excessive Insulin Secretion.. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 107(7), e2729-e2737, Article ID dgac221.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Extreme Variations in Muscle Fiber Composition Enable Detection of Insulin Resistance and Excessive Insulin Secretion.
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 107, no 7, p. e2729-e2737, article id dgac221Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

CONTEXT: Muscle fiber composition is associated with peripheral insulin action.

OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether extreme differences in muscle fiber composition are associated with alterations in peripheral insulin action and secretion in young, healthy subjects who exhibit normal fasting glycemia and insulinemia.

METHODS: Relaxation time following a tetanic contraction was used to identify subjects with a high or low expression of type I muscle fibers: group I (n=11), area occupied by type I muscle fibers = 61.0 ± 11.8%; group II (n=8), type I area = 36.0 ± 4.9% (P<0.001). Biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle and analyzed for mitochondrial respiration on permeabilized fibers, muscle fiber composition and capillary density. An intravenous glucose tolerance test was performed and indices of glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and secretion were determined.

RESULTS: Glucose tolerance was similar between groups, whereas whole-body insulin sensitivity was decreased by ~50% in group II vs group I (P=0.019). First phase insulin release (area under the insulin curve during 10 min after glucose infusion) was increased by almost 4-fold in group II vs I (P=0.01). Whole-body insulin sensitivity was correlated with % area occupied by type I fibers (r=0.54; P=0.018) and capillary density in muscle (r=0.61; P=0.005), but not with mitochondrial respiration. Insulin release was strongly related to % area occupied by type II fibers (r=0.93; P<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Assessment of muscle contractile function in young healthy subjects may prove useful in identifying individuals with insulin resistance and enhanced glucose stimulated insulin secretion prior to onset of clinical manifestations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2022
Keywords
insulin, insulin resistance, insulin secretion, intravenous glucose tolerance test, mitochondrial respiration, muscle fiber type
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Research subject
Medicine/Technology; Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7053 (URN)10.1210/clinem/dgac221 (DOI)000789019300001 ()35405014 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-05-18 Created: 2022-05-18 Last updated: 2022-12-06
Projects
The role of individual muscle-tendon characteristics for running shoe performance enhancement [CIF P2021-0057]; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIHInteraction between impaired glucose control and sleep disturbances in elite athletes [CIF P2021-0094, CIF 2022-0049]; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1343-8656

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