Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 80) Show all publications
Nooijen, C. F., Kallings, L., Blom, V., Ekblom, Ö., Forsell, Y. & Ekblom, M. (2018). Common Perceived Barriers and Facilitators for Reducing Sedentary Behaviour among Office Workers.. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15(4), Article ID E792.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Common Perceived Barriers and Facilitators for Reducing Sedentary Behaviour among Office Workers.
Show others...
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 15, no 4, article id E792Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Qualitative studies identified barriers and facilitators associated with work-related sedentary behaviour. The objective of this study was to determine common perceived barriers and facilitators among office workers, assess subgroup differences, and describe sedentary behaviour. From two Swedish companies, 547 office workers (41 years (IQR = 35–48), 65% women, 66% highly educated) completed questionnaires on perceived barriers and facilitators, for which subgroup differences in age, gender, education, and workplace sedentary behaviour were assessed. Sedentary behaviour was measured using inclinometers (n = 311). The most frequently reported barrier was sitting is a habit (67%), which was reported more among women than men (X2 = 5.14, p = 0.03) and more among highly sedentary office workers (X2 = 9.26, p < 0.01). The two other most reported barriers were that standing is uncomfortable (29%) and standing is tiring (24%). Facilitators with the most support were the introduction of either standing- or walking-meetings (respectively 33% and 29%) and more possibilities or reminders for breaks (31%). The proportion spent sedentary was 64% at the workplace, 61% on working days, and 57% on non-working days. This study provides a detailed understanding of office workers’ ideas about sitting and means to reduce sitting. We advise to include the supported facilitators and individualized support in interventions to work towards more effective strategies to reduce sedentary behaviour.

Keywords
barriers, facilitators, office workers, sedentary behaviour, workplace
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5262 (URN)10.3390/ijerph15040792 (DOI)29670047 (PubMedID)
Projects
Fysisk aktivitet och hälsosamma hjärnfunktioner: Delprojekt 1, Tvärsnittsstudie
Available from: 2018-05-25 Created: 2018-05-25 Last updated: 2018-05-28
Hallgren, M., Skott, M., Ekblom, Ö., Firth, J., Schembri, A. & Forsell, Y. (2018). Exercise effects on cognitive functioning in young adults with first-episode psychosis: FitForLife.. Psychological Medicine, 1-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exercise effects on cognitive functioning in young adults with first-episode psychosis: FitForLife.
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Psychological Medicine, ISSN 0033-2917, E-ISSN 1469-8978, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Exercise has mood-enhancing effects and can improve cognitive functioning, but the effects in first-episode psychosis (FEP) remain understudied. We examined the feasibility and cognitive effects of exercise in FEP.

METHOD: Multi-center, open-label intervention study. Ninety-one outpatients with FEP (mean age = 30 years, 65% male) received usual care plus a 12-week supervised circuit-training program, consisting of high-volume resistance exercises, aerobic training, and stretching. Primary study outcome was cognitive functioning assessed by Cogstate Brief Battery (processing speed, attention, visual learning, working memory) and Trailmaking A and B tasks (visual attention and task shifting). Within-group changes in cognition were assessed using paired sample t tests with effect sizes (Hedges' g) reported for significant values. Relationships between exercise frequency and cognitive improvement were assessed using analysis of covariance. Moderating effects of gender were explored with stratified analyses.

RESULTS: Participants exercised on average 13.5 (s.d. = 11.7) times. Forty-eight percent completed 12 or more sessions. Significant post-intervention improvements were seen for processing speed, visual learning, and visual attention; all with moderate effect sizes (g = 0.47-0.49, p < 0.05). Exercise participation was also associated with a positive non-significant trend for working memory (p < 0.07). Stratified analyses indicated a moderating effect of gender. Positive changes were seen among females only for processing speed, visual learning, working memory, and visual attention (g = 0.43-0.69). A significant bivariate correlation was found between total training frequency and improvements in visual attention among males (r = 0.40, p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION: Supported physical exercise is a feasible and safe adjunct treatment for FEP with potential cognitive benefits, especially among females.

Keywords
Cognition, exercise, first-episode, physical activity, psychosis, schizophrenia
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5276 (URN)10.1017/S0033291718001022 (DOI)29729687 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-31 Created: 2018-05-31 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Ekblom Bak, E., Ekblom, Ö., Andersson, G., Wallin, P. & Ekblom, B. (2018). Physical Education and Leisure-Time Physical Activity in Youth Are Both Important for Adulthood Activity, Physical Performance, and Health.. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 1-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical Education and Leisure-Time Physical Activity in Youth Are Both Important for Adulthood Activity, Physical Performance, and Health.
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health, ISSN 1543-3080, E-ISSN 1543-5474, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: The importance of youth physical activity (PA) for adulthood PA, performance, and health was retrospectively evaluated. Methods: A total of 258,146 participants (49% women), aged 19–70, with a first-time health-profile assessment between 1982 and 2015, provided self-reported data on current perceived health, PA, lifestyle, and physical education class participation, and PA outside school hours before age 20. Data on anthropometrics, blood pressure, and estimated maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) were obtained. Results: Women participating in physical education class, compared with those who did not, had significantly lower OR (range: 0.81–0.87) for perceiving poor overall health, general obesity, and high diastolic blood pressure after adjustment for potential confounders, and increased OR (range: 1.17–1.23) for exercising regularly and a normal/high VO2max in adulthood. For men, the ORs were significantly lower (range: 0.66–0.86) for poor perceived overall health, general, and abdominal obesity. These associations were seen for participants up to 70 years. Increased PA outside school hours revealed even stronger beneficial associations. In joint analyses, both youth and current PA were important for lower OR of poor health and being obese in adulthood. Conclusions: Physical education class participation and additional PA after school hours were both important for perceived health, PA, VO2max, and metabolic health in adulthood up to 70 years.

Keywords
VO2max, adolescent, epidemiology, physical fitness, public health
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5253 (URN)10.1123/jpah.2017-0083 (DOI)29706117 (PubMedID)
Projects
HPI-gruppen
Available from: 2018-05-15 Created: 2018-05-15 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
Helgadóttir, B., Owen, N., Dunstan, D. W., Ekblom, Ö., Hallgren, M. & Forsell, Y. (2017). Changes in physical activity and sedentary behavior associated with an exercise intervention in depressed adults. Psychology of Sport And Exercise, 30, 10-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in physical activity and sedentary behavior associated with an exercise intervention in depressed adults
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 30, p. 10-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Exercise is beneficial for depression, but less is known about its impact on post-intervention physical activity and sedentary behavior. The aim of this paper was to determine the extent to which participation in light-, moderate- and vigorous-intensity exercise intervention influenced habitual physical activity and sedentary behavior patterns in depressed adults. Methods Accelerometer data was collected pre- and post-intervention from depressed participants randomized to one of three 12-week intervention groups: light (n = 21), moderate (n = 25) and vigorous (n = 22) exercise. Mixed models examined changes in time spent sedentary and in light and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA); time accumulated in sedentary and MVPA bouts; and, number of MVPA bouts and interruptions in sedentary time. Results Overall sedentary time decreased while light activity time increased across all intervention groups but not significantly so. The light exercise intervention group reduced MVPA minutes (−8.22, 95% CI: −16.44, −0.01), time in MVPA bouts (−8.44, 95% CI: −14.27, −2.62), and number of activity bouts (−0.43, 95% CI: −0.77, −0.09). The moderate exercise intervention group reduced time in MVPA bouts (−6.27, 95% CI: −11.71, −0.82) and number of sedentary interruptions (−6.07, 95% CI: −9.30, −2.84). No changes were observed for the vigorous exercise intervention group. Conclusions The exercise intervention led to an increase in overall light physical activity and decrease in sedentary time, though neither change was statistically significant. Participation in the light and moderate exercise intervention groups was associated with reductions of time in MVPA bouts, but this was not evident for the vigorous exercise intervention group.

Keywords
Habitual physical activity, Exercise, Depression, Sedentary behavior, Intervention studies
National Category
Psychiatry Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4775 (URN)10.1016/j.psychsport.2017.01.006 (DOI)000400038900002 ()
Available from: 2017-02-17 Created: 2017-02-17 Last updated: 2017-06-07
Millischer, V., Erhardt, S., Ekblom, Ö., Forsell, Y. & Lavebratt, C. (2017). Twelve-week physical exercise does not have a long-lasting effect on kynurenines in plasma of depressed patients. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 13, 967-972
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Twelve-week physical exercise does not have a long-lasting effect on kynurenines in plasma of depressed patients
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, ISSN 1176-6328, E-ISSN 1178-2021, Vol. 13, p. 967-972Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Physical exercise has well-characterized positive effects on depressive symptoms. The underlying biologic mechanisms are, however, far from established. A recently discovered mechanism has linked the enhanced conversion of kynurenine to kynurenic acid (KYNA) to an increased resilience toward stress-induced depression in mice. The aim of this study was to translate these findings to humans.

Materials and methods: Kynurenine and KYNA levels were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography in plasma samples from 117 patients affected by mild-to-moderate depression before and within a week after a 12-week training period at three different intensities. The patients were part of the Regassa study.

Results: No differences in plasma levels of kynurenine and KYNA or in their ratio could be detected between before and after training. No effect of the intensity group could be observed. No correlation with the improvement in cardiovascular fitness (Åstrand score) or the improvement in mood (Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale score) could be observed.

Limitations: As the Regassa study is based on an intention-to-treat protocol, the exact time and the exact intensity of the physical exercise are not known. Analyses of pulse data as well as personal interviews, however, were used to control the exercise protocols. Furthermore, the observations reflect chronic changes.

Conclusion: Physical exercise positively affects mood and cardiovascular fitness, but does not lead to long-lasting changes in plasma levels of kynurenine and KYNA in patients affected by mild-to-moderate depression.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dove Medical Press, 2017
Keywords
Kynurenine pathway, kynurenine, kynurenic acid, depression, physical exercise, Neurosciences. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry, Internal medicine, Medicine
National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4855 (URN)10.2147/NDT.S131746 (DOI)000397975100001 ()
Available from: 2017-04-12 Created: 2017-04-12 Last updated: 2017-12-21
Olsson, S. J., Ekblom, Ö., Andersson, E., Börjesson, M. & Kallings, L. (2016). Categorical answer modes provides superior validity to open answers when asking for level of physical activity: A cross-sectional study. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 44(1), 70-76, Article ID 1403494815602830.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Categorical answer modes provides superior validity to open answers when asking for level of physical activity: A cross-sectional study
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 70-76, article id 1403494815602830Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS:

Physical activity (PA) used as prevention and treatment of disease has created a need for effective tools for measuring patients' PA level. Our aim was therefore to assess the validity of two PA questions and their three associated answer modes.

METHODS:

Data on PA according to the PA questions and Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometers, aerobic fitness (VO2max), cardiovascular biomarkers, and self-rated general health were collected in 365 Swedish adults (21-66 years). The PA questions ask about weekly PA via categories (Categorical), an open-ended answer (Open), or specified day by day (Table).

RESULTS:

The Categorical mode, compared with the Open mode, correlated (Spearman's rho) significantly more strongly (p<0.05) with accelerometer PA (0.31 vs. 0.18) and VO2max (0.27 vs. 0.06), and the level of BMI (-0.20 vs. -0.02), waist circumference (-0.22 vs. -0.03), diastolic blood pressure (-0.16 vs. 0.08), glucose (-0.18 vs. 0.04), triglycerides (-0.31 vs. -0.07), and general health (0.35 vs. 0.19). The validity of the Categorical and Table modes were similar regarding VO2max and accelerometry, but the Categorical mode exhibited more significant and stronger correlations with cardiovascular biomarkers. The capacity of the PA questions to identify insufficiently physically active individuals ranged from 0.57 to 0.76 for sensitivity and from 0.47 to 0.79 for specificity.

CONCLUSIONS:

The Categorical mode exhibits the strongest validity and Open mode the weakest. The PA questions may be used on a population level, or as a tool for determining patents' appropriateness for treatment.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-3958 (URN)10.1177/1403494815602830 (DOI)000369969000011 ()26392418 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-08-04 Created: 2015-08-04 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Helgadóttir, B., Dunstan, D., Owen, N., Ekblom, Ö., Hallgren, M. & Forsell, Y. (2016). Changes in Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior Associated with Exercise Interventions in Depressed Adults: 2109 Board #261 June 2, 3: 30 PM - 5: 00 PM.. In: Medicine And Science In Sports And Exercise 2016 May; Vol. 48 (5S Suppl 1), pp. 594.: (pp. 594-594). , 48(5S Suppl 1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior Associated with Exercise Interventions in Depressed Adults: 2109 Board #261 June 2, 3: 30 PM - 5: 00 PM.
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Medicine And Science In Sports And Exercise 2016 May; Vol. 48 (5S Suppl 1), pp. 594., 2016, Vol. 48, no 5S Suppl 1, p. 594-594Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: Exercise training programs are beneficial for depression, but less is known about their impact on non-intervention physical activity patterns and sedentary behavior patterns in depressed adults. We determined the extent to which participation in light-, moderate- and vigorous-intensity exercise intervention programs influenced the habitual physical activity and sedentary behavior patterns in depressed adults.

METHODS: Accelerometer data were collected pre- and post-treatment from a subset of depressed participants randomized to one of three 12-week exercise intervention programs: light (n=21), moderate (n=25) and vigorous (n=22) exercise. Mixed models examined changes in accelerometer-measured overall time spent in sedentary, light and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA); accumulated sedentary and MVPA bouts; and number of MVPA bouts and interruptions in sedentary time.

RESULTS: Overall sedentary time decreased while overall light activity increased across all intervention groups but neither significantly so. The light exercise intervention group reduced their MVPA minutes (-8.22, 95% CI: -16.44, -0.01), time in MVPA bouts (-8.44, 95% CI: -14.27, -2.62), and number of activity bouts (-0.43, 95% CI: -0.77, -0.09). The moderate exercise intervention group reduced the time in MVPA bouts (-6.27, 95% CI: -11.71, -0.82) and number of sedentary interruptions (-5.79, 95% CI: -9.11, -2.46). No changes were observed for the vigorous exercise intervention group.

CONCLUSIONS: On the whole, participating in a structured exercise intervention did not lead people who are affected by depression to significantly reduce their overall light physical activity nor to increase their sedentary time. Participation in the light and moderate exercise intervention programs was associated with reductions in overall MVPA, but this was not evident for the vigorous exercise intervention program.

National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4513 (URN)
Available from: 2016-08-05 Created: 2016-08-05 Last updated: 2016-08-08Bibliographically approved
Hallgren, M., Herring, M. P., Owen, N., Dunstan, D., Ekblom, Ö., Helgadottir, B., . . . Forsell, Y. (2016). Exercise, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behavior in the Treatment of Depression: Broadening the Scientific Perspectives and Clinical Opportunities.. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 7, Article ID 36.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exercise, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behavior in the Treatment of Depression: Broadening the Scientific Perspectives and Clinical Opportunities.
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, ISSN 1664-0640, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 7, article id 36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research exploring links between exercise and depression now span several decades, yet several clinically relevant research questions remain unanswered. This opinion article briefly describes the status of selected research issues from the exercise depression literature and offer insights into research areas that are currently lacking. We draw particular attention to the potential of research exploring links between sedentary behavior and depression.

National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4395 (URN)10.3389/fpsyt.2016.00036 (DOI)000371758700001 ()27014101 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-30 Created: 2016-03-30 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Ekblom, Ö. & Börjesson, M. (2016). Hela rörelsemönstret har betydelse. Idrottsmedicin, 35(3), 5-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hela rörelsemönstret har betydelse
2016 (Swedish)In: Idrottsmedicin, ISSN 2001-3302, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 5-7Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Svensk förening för fysisk aktivitet och idrottsmedicin, 2016
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4597 (URN)
Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2016-10-03Bibliographically approved
Ekblom-Bak, E., Ekblom, Ö., Bergström, G. & Börjesson, M. (2016). Isotemporal substitution of sedentary time by physical activity of different intensities and bout lengths, and its associations with metabolic risk.. European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, 23(9), 967-974
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Isotemporal substitution of sedentary time by physical activity of different intensities and bout lengths, and its associations with metabolic risk.
2016 (English)In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 23, no 9, p. 967-974Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Time spent being sedentary, regardless of time in exercise, has been associated with metabolic risk using regression modelling. By using isotemporal substitution modelling, the effect of replacing sedentary time with an equal amount of time in physical activity (PA) of different intensities can be considered. The present study aims to investigate the effect of replacing sedentary time with time in light, moderate and vigorous PA to the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Also, replacement of sedentary time by PA of different bout lengths was studied.

METHODS: In total, 836 participants (52% women), aged 50-64 years, from the SCAPIS pilot study were included. Daily time spent sedentary and in PA of different intensities was assessed using hip-worn accelerometers.

RESULTS: In this cross-sectional study, replacing 10 minutes of sedentary time with the same amount of light PA was associated with significant lower MetS prevalence, odds ratio (OR) 0.96 (95% confidence interval 0.93-0.98). Replacement with moderate PA resulted in even lower OR, 0.89 (0.82-0.97), with the lowest OR for vigorous PA, 0.41 (0.26-0.66). Participants with high energy intake and high daily sedentary time benefitted more from the replacement of sedentary time with light PA. Significant associations were seen for all bout lengths of light, moderate and vigorous PA in a stepwise-like fashion from one minute to up to 120 minute bouts.

CONCLUSION: Theoretical substitutions of sedentary time with PA of any intensity and of as little as one minute were associated with significantly lower ORs for MetS. This may be an easily communicable message in clinical practice and for public health purposes.

National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4246 (URN)10.1177/2047487315619734 (DOI)000376288500008 ()26635358 (PubMedID)
Projects
SCAPIS
Available from: 2015-12-08 Created: 2015-12-08 Last updated: 2018-04-26Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6058-4982

Search in DiVA

Show all publications