Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH

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Cumming, J., Nordin-Bates, S., Johnson, C., Sanchez, E. N. & Karageanes, S. J. (2024). High time to enhance dancer welfare: a call to action to improve safeguarding and abuse prevention in dance.. BMJ open sport & exercise medicine, 10(2), Article ID e001811.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High time to enhance dancer welfare: a call to action to improve safeguarding and abuse prevention in dance.
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2024 (English)In: BMJ open sport & exercise medicine, ISSN 2055-7647, Vol. 10, no 2, article id e001811Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While there is a lack of research into abuse in elite dance, numerous allegations of emotional, sexual and physical abuse of dancers can be found anecdotally in the media, legal convictions and personal accounts. As more dancers speak out, the scale of the problem within preprofessional schools and professional companies is becoming apparent. Accordingly, effective safeguarding mechanisms for preventing, identifying and reporting abuse are urgently needed. This viewpoint is intended to raise health professionals' awareness of factors contributing to abusive practices found in dance environments and the potential clinical implications of abuse to dancers' health and well-being. We also call for research and policy engagement on safeguarding and abuse prevention designed and implemented in partnership with stakeholders, aiming to promote safe and positive dance environments for all.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2024
Keywords
Elite performance, Injury, Protection, Psychology, Sexual harassment
National Category
Applied Psychology Performing Arts
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-8241 (URN)10.1136/bmjsem-2023-001811 (DOI)38736644 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-05-24 Created: 2024-05-24 Last updated: 2024-05-24
Nordin-Bates, S., Madigan, D. J., Hill, A. P. & Olsson, L. F. (2024). Perfectionism and performance in sport: Exploring non-linear relationships with track and field athletes. Psychology of Sport And Exercise, 70, Article ID 102552.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perfectionism and performance in sport: Exploring non-linear relationships with track and field athletes
2024 (English)In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 70, article id 102552Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The relationship between perfectionism – perfectionistic strivings and perfectionistic concerns – and athletic performance is contested and inconsistent. The present study explored the possibility that one explanation for this inconsistency is the assumption that the relationship is linear. In two samples, we tested alternative non-linear relationships between perfectionism and real-world competitive athletic performance. Sample one comprised 165 Swedish track and field athletes (57 % competing in female category, 42 % in male category; Mage = 16.93 years) and sample two comprised 157 British track and field athletes (55 % competing in female category, 43 % in male category; Mage = 18.42 years). Testing for linear and non-linear relationships, we found a quadratic effect whereby higher perfectionistic strivings had both positive increasing (i.e., U-shape; sample 1) and positive decreasing (i.e., inverted U-shape; sample 2) relationships with performance. We conclude that there may be circumstances when perfectionistic strivings contribute to better and worse sport performance, and that this relationship can be curvilinear.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Perfectionistic strivings, Perfectionistic concerns, Sport performance, Non-linear statistics, Quadratic effects, Athletics
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Applied Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7932 (URN)10.1016/j.psychsport.2023.102552 (DOI)001112347800001 ()37913912 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, P2019-0109
Available from: 2023-11-01 Created: 2023-11-01 Last updated: 2023-12-20
Dwarika, M. S. & Nordin-Bates, S. (2024). Supported or Thwarted? An Exploration of Autonomy Support in Ballet Teaching Informed by the Circumplex Model. Journal of Dance Education, 1-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Supported or Thwarted? An Exploration of Autonomy Support in Ballet Teaching Informed by the Circumplex Model
2024 (English)In: Journal of Dance Education, ISSN 1529-0824, E-ISSN 2158-074X, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

In this small-scale study we investigated ballet teachers’ views and experiences of autonomy and autonomy support. For this purpose, we conducted semi-structured interviews with six ballet teachers in a prestigious pre-professional ballet school in Europe. Findings indicate that when and how autonomy was provided seemed to be impacted by whether a teacher either challenged or adhered to ballet ideals. By using the Circumplex Model of motivation, three different levels of autonomy support could be identified: high autonomy support, moderate autonomy support, and controlling approaches. The findings present a nuanced picture of ballet teachers’ views, experiences, and teaching styles and suggest that dance educators move on a continuum of autonomy supportive and controlling behaviors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2024
Keywords
Dance teaching, ballet, motivation, self-determination theory, pedagogy
National Category
Performing Arts Applied Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-8288 (URN)10.1080/15290824.2023.2298503 (DOI)
Available from: 2024-06-14 Created: 2024-06-14 Last updated: 2024-06-14
Downing, C., Redelius, K. & Nordin-Bates, S. (2023). A systematic review of quantitative studies concerning psychological aspects of early specialisation. International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A systematic review of quantitative studies concerning psychological aspects of early specialisation
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Despite the intense and long-standing interest surrounding early sport specialisation, scholars still debate its nature and implications. Previous researchers have also identified the need for further research relating to the psychological aspects of early specialisation such as lower quality motivation, dropout and burnout. To help guide future research it is important to build upon the quantitative literature concerning such psychological aspects of early specialisation. The specific aims of this paper are to provide an overview of research results of quantitative studies that set out to explore relationships between early specialisation and psychological aspects, and to critically examine the designs of such studies. As such, study design characteristics including participant demographics, the psychological aspects represented, and the research questions and results are explored. Data searches were conducted in PubMed, SportDiscus, and PsychINFO using search terms such as "early sport speciali*". Twenty-one relevant papers met the inclusion criteria. The results highlight that the published papers in this area are broad in some respects (variety of sports, performance levels, and gender), but narrow in others (North American dominance, few psychological aspects explored, and few papers per psychological aspect). Many of the studies are based on cross-sectional and retrospective self-reports. Overall, this paper serves as a foundation on which to design future research studies in this area.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
Keywords
Youth sport, study designs, training history
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7892 (URN)10.1080/1612197X.2023.2251977 (DOI)001068374300001 ()
Available from: 2023-10-05 Created: 2023-10-05 Last updated: 2023-10-05
Haraldsen, H. M. M., Solstad, B. E., Fredriksen, D. C. S., Gustafsson, H., Nordin-Bates, S. & Knight, C. J. J. (2023). An exploration of reciprocity among teacher and students in female pre-professional ballet education: a shared reality theory perspective. Frontiers in Education, 8, Article ID 1148922.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An exploration of reciprocity among teacher and students in female pre-professional ballet education: a shared reality theory perspective
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2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Education, E-ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 8, article id 1148922Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the present study was to explore perceptions of shared reality in teacher-student partnerships in ballet, and how these perceptions were related to experiences of quality in the relationship and well-being. A longitudinal qualitative study design was adopted, with three female ballet students and their teacher participating in three semi-structured interviews each over an eight-month period. Data were analyzed using a combination of thematic and narrative analysis. Findings indicated that across the teacher-student relationships there were perceptions of a shared reality only on the professional and distanced level and not on a relational and personal level. This was achieved by a common experience of what matters in the world of ballet education as well as students finding their teacher as trustworthy. Furthermore, it appeared that the authoritarian apprenticeship culture in ballet, where the teachers give clear instructions and feedback, and where the student role is to listen and adapt to the teacher's instructions, was a barrier to fully achieving a shared reality on a personal and deeper level. In turn, this influenced the quality of the relationship and the wellbeing of both teacher and students. The present study offers critical reflections on the cultural backdrop of teaching and learning in ballet and highlights the importance of teachers to facilitate a supportive, unconditional, and trustworthy relationship so that they can work together in a more productive manner.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
Keywords
narrative inquiry, ballet dancers, teacher-student relationship, apprenticeship learning, shared reality theory, interpersonal trust, longitudinal qualitative research
National Category
Educational Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7677 (URN)10.3389/feduc.2023.1148922 (DOI)000997622300001 ()
Available from: 2023-06-27 Created: 2023-06-27 Last updated: 2023-06-27
Lubert, V. J., Nordin-Bates, S. & Gröpel, P. (2023). Effects of tailored interventions for anxiety management in choking-susceptible performing artists: a mixed-methods collective case study.. Frontiers in psychology, 14, Article ID 1164273.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of tailored interventions for anxiety management in choking-susceptible performing artists: a mixed-methods collective case study.
2023 (English)In: Frontiers in psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 14, article id 1164273Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Not being able to manage performance anxiety and subsequently experiencing a decline in performance have been called "choking under pressure". High trait anxiety and fear of negative evaluation, as well as low self-efficacy or self-confidence, can put performers especially at risk of experiencing choking. This study, therefore, examined the effects of psychological choking interventions tailored to "choking-susceptible" performing artists individually in a coaching setting.

METHODS: We conducted a mixed-methods (QUANT + QUAL) collective case study with nine performing artists, who each received five individual coaching sessions. The tailored choking interventions comprised acclimatization training, goal setting, and pre-performance routines, including elements such as imagery, self-talk, and relaxation techniques. Before and after the 10-week intervention phase, they filled in questionnaires on trait performance anxiety, fear of negative evaluation, and self-efficacy, performed in front of a jury, and were interviewed about their experiences. Transcripts of interviews and coaching sessions were analyzed using thematic analysis. Heart rate measurements, weekly performance videos, and expert evaluations were also part of our comprehensive data.

RESULTS: Quantitative data showed reductions in performance anxiety and fear of negative evaluation, and increases in self-efficacy and performance quality, from before to after the intervention phase. Most participants also had a lower heart rate when performing for the jury. Themes from qualitative analysis comprised managing nervousness and feeling more relaxed, becoming more self-confident, satisfaction with artistic and mental performance, feeling good and enjoying performing, and general positive effects.

CONCLUSION: Tailoring psychological interventions may provide several benefits for choking-susceptible performing artists.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
Keywords
choking, mixed-methods, performance anxiety, performance under pressure, performing arts, psychological interventions, tailored interventions
National Category
Applied Psychology Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7665 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2023.1164273 (DOI)000998377000001 ()37275685 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-06-26 Created: 2023-06-26 Last updated: 2023-06-27
Nordin-Bates, S. (2023). Essentials of Dance Psychology (1ed.). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Essentials of Dance Psychology
2023 (English)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The topic of sport psychology is hardly new—but Essentials of Dance Psychology applies it to dance in a way that sets it apart from all other sport psychology texts available to dance students, instructors, and professionals.

Through Essentials of Dance Psychology, readers will come to understand why dancers think and behave as they do and how to design healthy, creative dance environments that lead to both well-being and optimal performance.

The book is built on a foundation of evidence from dance and sport psychology research, with applied experiences used as examples throughout. Where appropriate, evidence from other areas of psychology—for example, cognitive behavioral therapy—is used. A thorough coverage of topics relevant to dancers, teachers, and others working to support dancers is included, making the book suitable for one slightly longer course or two short courses in introductory dance psychology.

The book is organized into four parts. Part I delves into dancers’ individual differences, examining how personality, perfectionism, self-esteem, self-confidence, and anxiety factor into performance and well-being. Part II explores topics related to dance-specific characteristics such as motivation, attentional focus, and creativity. In part III, readers learn about a range of psychological skills, including mindfulness, goal setting, self-regulation, and imagery. Part IV examines topics related to dance environments and challenges, zeroing in on the social aspects of teaching and learning dance, the challenges of talent identification and development, injuries, body image, and disordered eating.

Essentials of Dance Psychology offers readers the opportunity to understand sport psychology from the vantage point of a dancer. The text will help develop dance teachers who are able to inspire and sustain high levels of performance and psychological health among dancers. It will also help other professionals who work with dancers to implement evidence-based practices that enhance and sustain dancers’ lives and careers. [Text from publisher]

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2023. p. 352 Edition: 1
National Category
Applied Psychology Performing Arts Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7113 (URN)9781718210004 (ISBN)9781718207554 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-08-17 Created: 2022-08-17 Last updated: 2022-11-22Bibliographically approved
Stornæs, A. V., Sundgot-Borgen, J., Pettersen, G., Rosenvinge, J. H. & Nordin-Bates, S. (2023). Mental health profiles among 13-16-year-Old Norwegian talent and mainstream students - A prospective person-centered analytical approach. Psychology of Sport And Exercise, 68, Article ID 102474.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mental health profiles among 13-16-year-Old Norwegian talent and mainstream students - A prospective person-centered analytical approach
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2023 (English)In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 68, article id 102474Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To contribute further knowledge about symptoms of anxiety, depression, body concerns, and self-worth among young talent development (TD) and mainstream students by exploring the indicators within person combinations prospectively, aiming to identify distinct profiles.

Methods: We included 946 students, n = 168 (45% girls) from three TD sports schools and one ballet class, n =778 (52% girls) from ten mainstream schools. All were 13–14 years at T1 and 15–16 years at T2. Descriptive statistics were examined via variable-centered approaches: ANOVA and cross-tabulations. Mental health profiles were explored via person-centered approaches: latent profile and latent transition analysis, including profile stability over two years and school type, gender, and perfectionism association with profiles.

Results: TD girls’ and boys’ anxiety and depression scores did not differ, but girls reported more weight-shape concerns. Mainstream schoolgirls fared worse compared to all others. Four retained profiles (distressed-body concerned, dissatisfied, moderate mentally healthy, mentally healthy) showed distinct patterns of co-occurring anxiety, depression, weight-shape concerns, and self-worth. Profile stability was high overall (72–93%). The highest proportion of TD boys was in the mentally healthy, TD girls and mainstream boys in moderate, and mainstream girls within the dissatisfied profile. Noteworthy transitions: TD boys who transitioned were likely changing to healthier profiles and girls to unhealthier. Unhealthier profiles were associated with socially prescribed perfectionism.

Conclusion: TD students fared relatively better than mainstream students. Still, considerable proportions of girls were identified in the unhealthiest profiles. These findings involving young TD and mainstream students propose a need for specific follow-up measures to promote mental health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Dance, Youth athletes, Distress, Self-worth, Body concerns, Latent profile analysis
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Psychiatry
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7680 (URN)10.1016/j.psychsport.2023.102474 (DOI)001030377800001 ()37665914 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-06-27 Created: 2023-06-27 Last updated: 2023-09-14
Nordin-Bates, S., Lundström, P., Melin, A. K., Sundgot-Borgen, J. & Edlund, K. (2023). Preventing Disordered Eating in Teenage Ballet Students: Evaluation of DancExcellent, a Combined CBT and Nutrition Education Intervention.. Medical problems of performing artists, 38(2), 71-79
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preventing Disordered Eating in Teenage Ballet Students: Evaluation of DancExcellent, a Combined CBT and Nutrition Education Intervention.
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2023 (English)In: Medical problems of performing artists, ISSN 0885-1158, E-ISSN 1938-2766, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 71-79Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Disordered eating (DE) behaviors are relatively common among high-level dancers, especially in classical ballet. At the same time, interventions aimed at reducing DE behaviors in this population are scarce.

METHODS: An 8-week exploratory preventive intervention for DE behaviors was carried out in a high-level ballet school for 40 teenagers aged 12-15 years (77.5% female). Both risk factors (perfectionism) and potentially protective factors (self-esteem, self-compassion) for the development of DE behaviors were considered. The intervention was created specifically for this study and consisted of five cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) workshops and four nutrition workshops. Additional components included newsletters for pupils and educational sessions and social media interactions with staff and parents. The intervention comprised two phases (control and intervention periods), with students acting as their own controls. Standardized questionnaires were completed before and after both phases.

RESULTS: Questionnaire results did not indicate any changes in reported perfectionism, self-esteem, or self-compassion, nor were symptoms of DE affected during either the control or intervention periods.

CONCLUSIONS: The intervention did not yield any discernible impact. However, it was affected by the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, which limits our ability to draw conclusions about intervention effectiveness. Evaluations with pupils offer several considerations for future improvements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Science & Medicine, 2023
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Applied Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7664 (URN)10.21091/mppa.2023.2009 (DOI)001019536400001 ()37260214 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, P2019-0063
Available from: 2023-06-26 Created: 2023-06-26 Last updated: 2024-06-01Bibliographically approved
Nordin-Bates, S., Aldoson, M. & Downing, C. (2023). Revisiting Perfectionism in High-Level Ballet: A Longitudinal Collective Instrumental Case Study. The Sport psychologist, 37(1), 1-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Revisiting Perfectionism in High-Level Ballet: A Longitudinal Collective Instrumental Case Study
2023 (English)In: The Sport psychologist, ISSN 0888-4781, E-ISSN 1543-2793, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Using a case study design, we explored two ballet dancers' perfectionism experiences via interviews and questionnaires at two time points 5 years apart. They represented the two types of "pure perfectionism" in the 2 x 2 model of perfectionism: a female representing pure personal standards perfectionism (high perfectionistic strivings, low perfectionistic concerns) and a male representing pure evaluative concerns perfectionism (low perfectionistic strivings, high perfectionistic concerns). The pure personal standards perfectionism dancer reported stable perfectionism across time, seemingly resilient to any perfectionistic concerns developing. She attributed this to her stable, grounded personality, also reporting autonomous motivation and performance success. The dancer representing pure evaluative concerns perfectionism reported increased perfectionistic strivings and lowered perfectionistic concerns over time; concurrently, his motivation became less controlled and more autonomous. He described the reasons in terms of improved basic psychological needs satisfaction and personal growth. Overall, autonomy might be important in mitigating perfectionism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Human Kinetics, 2023
Keywords
dance, self-determination theory, perfectionism development
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7543 (URN)10.1123/tsp.2022-0054 (DOI)000928409100001 ()
Available from: 2023-03-14 Created: 2023-03-14 Last updated: 2023-03-23
Projects
Aesthetic performance cultures: perfectionistic, abusive, injurious? [CIF P2023-0018]; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3428-6900

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