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Backman, E. (2016). Content knowledge or pedagogical content knowledge?: Exploring learning outcomes for Australian trainee teachers in physical education. In: : . Paper presented at ECER 2016 Leading Education: The Distinct Contributions of Educational Research and Researchers, The European Conference on Educational Research, Dublin 22-26 August, 2016..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Content knowledge or pedagogical content knowledge?: Exploring learning outcomes for Australian trainee teachers in physical education
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the context of physical education teacher education (PETE), content knowledge (CK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) are constructions of different forms of teacher knowledge that have been used to address knowledge of a subject and knowledge of teaching a subject to young people (Herold & Waring 2009, Siedentop 2009, Tinning 2010). This paper addresses how these two forms of teacher knowledge are valued through a study of learning outcomes (LOs) in syllabus documents at a sample of PETE universities in New South Wales, Australia. The US educationalist Lee Shulman (1987) originally defined CK as “the accumulation of literature and studies in content areas, and the historical and philosophical scholarship on the nature of knowledge in those fields of study” (p. 8-9). In the PETE context, CK is constructed by various sub-disciplines (Tinning 2010). According to Siedentop (2009), one of the most fundamental as well as the most marginalized of these sub-disciplines, is PE teacher students’ knowledge of movement. In this study, specific interest is devoted to how CK and PCK are expressed in documents regulating sport and movement courses within PETE. Regarding PCK, Shulman (1987) suggests it to be “that special amalgam of content and pedagogy that is uniquely the province of teachers, their own special form of professional understanding” (p. 8. Globally, there seems to be an agreement for the importance of future PE teachers to experience movement and sport practices during their education. However, there also seems to be different ideas about whether CK or PCK should by prioritized in the teaching and assessment of movement and sport practices during PETE (Backman & Pearson 2016, Capel, et al 2011, Herold & Waring 2009, Johnson 2013, Tinning 2010). The study of how LOs are expressed in an educational context can inform us not only of what forms of knowledge are most valued. It might also say something about PE teacher educators’ abilities to formulate his/her expectations of the student’s performance. For this instance, the discussion of learning objectives as formulated in university courses has lately been intensified. In Europe, this discussion has been strongly related to the intentions in the Bologna-declaration (Adam 2008, Brooks et al 2014, Hussey & Smith 2008). Some of the issues raised in the literature have concerned ways of formulating verbs in learning outcomes, student activity built into learning outcomes, and level of difficulty in learning outcomes (Adam 2008, Biggs & Tang 2007). Therefore, the aim of this paper is to analyse LOs formulated in syllabus document for sport courses at a sample of Australian PETE institutions. Further, the aim is to discuss these LOs through a framework regarding teacher knowledge originating from Lee Shulman (1987). Although PETE, like university programs in other subjects, are historical and cultural constructions, research from European countries such as UK, France, Sweden (Backman &Pearson 2016, Capel, et al 2011, Loquet & Ranganathan 2010) display similarities with the Australian PETE context. One characteristic feature of PETE in all these countries is the relative emphasis on constructivist epistemology and critical pedagogy, although this feature appears to be somewhat stronger in Australia compared to Europe and US. In times where the content in PETE is crowded and the time for teaching is short, a study of what forms of PE teacher knowledge are valued in some Australian PETE institutions, a context where the production of PETE research has been significant during the last decades (see e.g. Forrest 2015, Garrett & Wrench 2012, MacDonald et al 2002, Tinning 2010), can therefore serve as a valuable contrast for the discussion of knowledge forms in European PETE contexts.    

Methods/methodology (up to 400 words) 

By the end of 2014, there were 24 universities across Australia offering PETE, eight in New South Wales (NSW). These eight universities in NSW makes the total sample (N=8) in the study reported in this paper. To the collection of the empirical material in form of written documents, five PETE-universities (n=5) of the total sample have contributed. Each university was asked to contribute with two unit outlines for courses in sport and movement for PETE students. A unit outline is a written document intended to give the student more specific information compared to what a curriculum document for a course will provide (e.g. regarding examination, schedule, expectations, etc). Further, a unit is generally only a part of a whole course. The collected unit outlines contained a the total number of 73 LOs. The sample of unit outlines can be described as a strategic and purposeful sample (Patton, 2002). The empirical collection from the participating universities was carried out during November and December 2014. After information about the study through e-mail and phone, a total number of 10 unit outlines were sent to the author by e-mail. In the analysis Alvesson and Sköldberg (1994) description of analytical induction or abduction has served as an inspiration. This means trying to let, on one hand, the empirical material inform the choice of theoretical perspective while on the other hand, acknowledging that some specific theoretical perspectives, in this case Shulman’s (1987) forms of teacher knowledge, have been viewed as more relevant than others before conducting the study. The primary analysis has been divided into two steps. In the first step, when reading through the collected and transcribed material questions such as: ‘What movement and sport practices do students meet during PETE in NSW?’ and ‘How are movement and sport practices expressed through the LOs in the unit outlines?’ has been asked. Asking these questions to the material has involved a process of clustering described by Patton (2002) as convergence which has been followed up by a process of divergence, that is, an exclusion of formulations and quotes that do not fit into the identified pattern. In the second stage of the analysis, the choice of Shulman’s (1987) concepts for forms of teacher knowledge was confirmed and strengthened as we discovered that the different views of assessment of movement and sport practices were clearly related to our chosen definitions of CK and PCK.

Expected outcomes/results (up to 300 words) 

The preliminary analysis of the LOs shows that the knowledge in sport and movement courses at the investigated PETE institutions is sometimes formulated as CK and sometimes as PCK (Shulman 1987). Within these two main categories there were also sub-categories related to abilities expressed through different verbs. With regards to PCK one such main sub-category addressed the students’ ability to “plan, arrange, carry out and assess different forms of teaching situations”. Further, another ability expressed within the PCK category was the ability to “observe, analyse and critically reflect over educational practices”. These two PCK sub-categories clearly reflect research emphasizing critical pedagogy in Australian PETE (Garrett & Wrench 2012, MacDonald et al 2002, Tinning 2010). Further, two other forms of sub-categories, expressed both as CK and as PCK, was firstly, the ability to “perform movements” and secondly, the ability to “demonstrate an understanding” of different forms of movement and sport practices. Findings will be discussed in relation to research criticizing the decrease of sport performances in PETE (Herold & Waring 2009, Siedentop 2009) as well as work emphasizing the importance to teach and assess movement practices to PETE students in contextualized situations (Backman & Pearson 2016). The concept of “understanding” was found to be very commonly used in LOs both when expressed as CK and as PCK. Generally, students were encouraged to “demonstrate an understanding” of different forms of knowledge. In literature of how to formulate knowledge in higher education, the concept of understanding has been discussed, sometimes criticized as lacking precision (Adam 2008, Biggs & Tang 2007), sometimes claimed to be under-contextualised (Hussey & Smith 2008). Part of the discussion will focus on various meanings of understanding in sport courses at some Australian PETE-institutions and how these meanings can differ depending on whether CK or PCK is addressed.

Intent of publication:  

References (400 words)

Adam, S. (2008). Learning Outcomes Current Developments in Europe: Update on the Issues and Applications of Learning Outcomes Associated with the Bologna Process. Retrieved 12 May 2015, from http://www.ond.vlaanderen.be/hogeronderwijs/bologna/BolognaSeminars/documents/Edinburgh/Edinburgh_Feb08_Adams.pdf

Alvesson, M. & Sköldberg, K. (1994). Tolkning och Reflektion. Vetenskapsfilosofi och Kvalitativ Metod. Lund: Studentlitteratur.

Backman, E. & Pearson, P. (2016) ‘We should assess the students in more authentic situations’: Swedish PE teacher educators’ views of the meaning of movement skills for future PE teachers. European Physical Education Review, 22, 47–64.

Biggs, J., & Tang, C. (2007). Teaching for Quality Learning at University. Third edition. Maidenhead: Open University Press.

Brooks, S., Dobbins, K., Scott, J. J., Rawlinson, M., & Norman, R. I. (2014). Learning about Learning Outcomes: The Student Perspective. Teaching in Higher Education, 19, 721-733.

Capel, S., Hayes, S., Katene, W. and Velija, P. (2011). The interaction of factors which influence secondary student physical education teachers’ knowledge and development as teachers. European Physical Education Review, 17, 183–201.

Forrest, G. (2015). Systematic assessment of game-centred approach practices – the game-centred approach Assessment Scaffold. Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 20, 144-158.

Garrett, R. & Wrench, A. (2012). ‘Society has taught us to judge’: cultures of the body in teacher education. Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education, 40, 111–126.

Herold, F. & Waring, M. (2009). Pre-service physical education teachers’ perceptions of subject knowledge: Augmenting learning to teach. European Physical Education Review, 15, 337–364.

Hussey, T., & Smith, P. (2008). Learning Outcomes: A Conceptual Analysis. Teaching in Higher Education, 13 (1), 107-115.

Johnson, T.G. (2013). The value of performance in Physical Education teacher education. Quest, 65, 485-497.

Loquet, M. & Ranganathan, M. (2010). Content knowledge in teaching, an investigation into an adequate ‘milieu’ for teaching dance: The case of Indian dance in France. European Physical Education Review, 16, 65–79.

MacDonald, D., Hunter, L., Carlson, T. & Penney, D. (2002). Teacher Knowledge and the Disjunction between School Curricula and Teacher Education. Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education, 30, 259-275.

Patton, M.Q. (2002). Qualitative Research and Evaluation Methods. London: Sage Publications.

Shulman, L.S. (1987). Knowledge and Teaching: Foundations of the New Reform. Harvard Educational Review, 57(1), 1-21.

Siedentop, D. (2009). Content Knowledge for Physical Education. In R. Bailey & D. Kirk (Eds.), The Routledge Physical Education Reader (pp. 243-253). Abingdon: Routledge.

Tinning, R. (2010). Pedagogy and human movement: theory, practice, research. Abingdon: Routledge.

Keywords
Australia, learning outcomes, Fenstermacher, Shulman, content knowledge
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4544 (URN)
External cooperation:
Conference
ECER 2016 Leading Education: The Distinct Contributions of Educational Research and Researchers, The European Conference on Educational Research, Dublin 22-26 August, 2016.
Available from: 2016-08-25 Created: 2016-08-25 Last updated: 2016-09-05Bibliographically approved
Backman, E. (2016). Friluftsorganisationernas roll och villkor. In: Ulf Silvander (Ed.), Friluftslivet och politiken: Svenskt Friluftslivs friluftspolitiska program 2016 (pp. 78-87). Bromma: Svenskt Friluftsliv
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Friluftsorganisationernas roll och villkor
2016 (Swedish)In: Friluftslivet och politiken: Svenskt Friluftslivs friluftspolitiska program 2016 / [ed] Ulf Silvander, Bromma: Svenskt Friluftsliv , 2016, p. 78-87Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bromma: Svenskt Friluftsliv, 2016
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4414 (URN)
Available from: 2016-04-20 Created: 2016-04-20 Last updated: 2017-01-20Bibliographically approved
Mikaels, J., Backman, E. & Lundvall, S. (2016). In and out of place: exploring the discursive effects of teachers' talk about outdoor education in secondary schools in New Zealand. Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 16(2), 91-104
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In and out of place: exploring the discursive effects of teachers' talk about outdoor education in secondary schools in New Zealand
2016 (English)In: Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, ISSN 1472-9679, E-ISSN 1754-0402, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 91-104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this article is to explore and problematise teachers’ talk about outdooreducation in New Zealand. The focus is on what can be said, how it is said and thediscursive effects of such ways of speaking. The inquiry draws on Foucauldiantheoretical insights to analyse interview transcripts derived from semi-structured interviewswith eight outdoor education teachers who work at secondary schools in NewZealand. Findings suggest that different discourses co-exist and are intertwined in theparticipants’ talk. Associated with a dominating discourse of adventure are subdiscoursesof risk and safety, pursuit-based activities, skill and assessment. Connected to adiscourse of learning are subdiscourses of environment, sustainability and socialcritique. Resistance towards a dominating discourse of adventure with pursuit-basedactivities can be traced in a discourse of learning in the form of a more placeresponsivepedagogy.

Keywords
Discourse, adventure, learning, place, curriculum
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4159 (URN)10.1080/14729679.2015.1086660 (DOI)000380145700001 ()
Available from: 2015-09-24 Created: 2015-09-24 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Backman, E. (2016). ”Tell us what to do and how to assess!”: Swedish PE teachers’ experiences of the implementation of Support For Assessment in outdoor education.. In: : . Paper presented at European seminar of the Institute of Outdoor Adventure Education and Experiential Learning. Changing Horizons - challenges to Outdoor Education in Europe. Sept., 07 - 11, 2016 Salzburg.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>”Tell us what to do and how to assess!”: Swedish PE teachers’ experiences of the implementation of Support For Assessment in outdoor education.
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In Sweden, as in many European countries, Outdoor Education (OE, or its Scandinavian equivalent as friluftsliv) is in the formal school setting positioned within the subject Health and Physical Education (HPE). In the curriculum for compulsory school, implemented in 2011, OE is organized as one of three areas of knowledge along with Health and Lifestyle, and Movement. In order to meet the increasing call for a more equal assessment and grading in Swedish Schools, the Swedish National Agency of Education (SNAE) completed the curriculum in HPE with a material (text and film) named Support For Assessment (SFA) in 2012. As responsible for the construction of OE in SFA the author followed up the implementation of the SFA with several presentations and workshops for teachers in HPE during 2013 and 2014. The purpose of this presentation is to describe how OE was constructed in the SFA in Swedish HPE for compulsory school and further to analyse and discuss reactions from Swedish HPE teachers expressed in evaluations after the mentioned presentations and workshops. The results suggest that while a part of the HPE teachers found the SFA useful and effective, another part called for more concrete advices on what to assess in OE and how to assess it. Drawing on Basil Bernstein’s theories of how pedagogical messages are communicated and evaluated in school systems, the results will be discussed in relation to the classification of OE within Swedish HPE.

Keywords
Outdoor education, assessment, schools
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4543 (URN)
External cooperation:
Conference
European seminar of the Institute of Outdoor Adventure Education and Experiential Learning. Changing Horizons - challenges to Outdoor Education in Europe. Sept., 07 - 11, 2016 Salzburg
Available from: 2016-08-25 Created: 2016-08-25 Last updated: 2016-09-05Bibliographically approved
Backman, E. & Pearson, P. (2016). ‘We should assess the students in more authentic situations’: Swedish PE teacher educators’ views of the meaning of movement skills for future PE teachers. European Physical Education Review, 22(1), 47-64
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘We should assess the students in more authentic situations’: Swedish PE teacher educators’ views of the meaning of movement skills for future PE teachers
2016 (English)In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 47-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The question of what knowledge a student of Physical Education (PE) needs to develop during PE teacher education (PETE) was recently discussed. One form of knowledge is the movement practices that students must meet during their education. Given the limited time, a delicate matter is whether to prioritize movement knowledge and consider it as subject matter knowledge (e.g. performance of the freestyle stroke) or as pedagogical content knowledge (e.g. teaching how to perform the freestyle stroke). The aim is to investigate Swedish PE teacher educators’ views on the meaning of movement skills for future PE teachers and to analyse the learning cultures made visible in the ways the meaning of movement is expressed. We conducted interviews with 12 teachereducators and collected documents with tasks for assessment from five PETE universities in Sweden. Inspired by Bourdieu’s field metaphor, and particularly its use by Hodkinson et al. on learning cultures, we then analysed the collected material. In the results, different views on the meaning of movement skills are made visible. The PE teacher can be seen as an instructor, as well as a facilitator of movements. Movement skills can be seen as essential for a teacher in PE, as well as valuable but not essential. Movement quality can also be viewed as universal, as well as contextual. Swedish teacher educators in PE appear to ascribe value to all the positions made visible in this study. These results are discussed from the perspectives of epistemology, assessment and learning cultures.

Keywords
Curriculum, education, assessment, epistemology, learning culture, movement skills, physical education, practice, Sweden, teacher education, teaching methods, theory
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-3861 (URN)10.1177/1356336X15589203 (DOI)000367468900003 ()
Projects
Vad ska en idrottslärare kunna
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports
Available from: 2015-06-20 Created: 2015-06-20 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Backman, E. & Larsson, H. (2016). What should a Physical Education teacher know?: An analysis of learning outcomes for future Physical Education teachers in Sweden.. Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 21(2), 185-200
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What should a Physical Education teacher know?: An analysis of learning outcomes for future Physical Education teachers in Sweden.
2016 (English)In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 185-200Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research indicates that Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) has only limited impact on how physical education (PE) is taught in schools. This paper offers possible explanations for the difficulties of influencing subject traditions in PE through analysing PETE curriculum documents. The purpose is show how knowledge is expressed through learning outcomes in local curriculum documents at six PETE institutions in Sweden. Inspired by Fenstermacher’s ideas about teacher knowledge, our ambition is to discuss the potential educational consequences of the epistemological assumptions underlying specific learning outcomes. From the total number of 224 learning outcomes described in the curriculum documents, different types of knowledge were identified and clustered together into the following themes: Teaching PE, Interpreting curriculum documents, Physical movement skills, Science, Social health, Pedagogy, Critical inquiry, and Research methods. In most of the identified themes, learning outcomes are formulated with an integrated perspective on so called performance knowledge and propositional knowledge. However, particularly in the themes Science and Physical movement skills, two very influential themes, the concept of knowledge is limited and unilateral in relation to ideas of different forms of teacher knowledge. Drawing on the work of Tinning, we offer an explanation as to how teacher knowledge in the themes Science and Physical movement skills, emanating from behaviouristic and craft knowledge orientations, is formulated.

Keywords
Physical education teacher education, Curriculum documents, Learning outcomes, Propositional knowledge, Performance knowledge, Epistemology.
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-2510 (URN)10.1080/17408989.2014.946007 (DOI)000368714300005 ()
Projects
Vad ska en idrottslärare kunna
Available from: 2012-11-30 Created: 2012-11-30 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Backman, E. & Pearson, P. (2015). Movement skills as content knowledge and/or as pedagogic content knowledge?: Identifying gaps in Australian PETE research.. In: : . Paper presented at Australian Association for Research in Education - University of Queensland Health and Physical Education RESEARCH CONFERENCE i Brisbane, 19-20 juni, 2015. (pp. .-.). , .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Movement skills as content knowledge and/or as pedagogic content knowledge?: Identifying gaps in Australian PETE research.
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The discussion of what constitute subject matter knowledge in Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) has been intense and ongoing, particularly in the US and in Australia. One central part of this discussion have concerned the movement and sporting practices that students meet during their education. While most PETE scholars agree on the value for PETE students to experience movement and sport practices during their education, there are different ideas about the extent and in what form these should be taught and as to whether, and in what form, these should be assessed. In Australia, the discussion of movement and sport practices in PETE has very much been focused on various adaptations of the Sport Education model, the Game Centered Approach and Teaching Games for Understanding. However, given the limitations of time and resources, the issue of whether to prioritize movement and sport practices seen as a form of knowledge in itself or as means for teaching pupils in, through and about movement, has only been slightly dealt with in research of Australian PETE. Inspired by Shulman’s division of different forms of teacher knowledge, and in particular subject matter knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge, we want to address gaps in the Australian research on movement and sport practices in PETE. Illuminating the local construction of dominant as well as marginalized research discourses might help identify issues in need of research. 

National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-3888 (URN)
Conference
Australian Association for Research in Education - University of Queensland Health and Physical Education RESEARCH CONFERENCE i Brisbane, 19-20 juni, 2015.
Note

Paper presenterat vid AARE-UQ HPE RESEARCH CONFERENCE vid University of Queensland i Brisbane, 19-20 juni, 2015.

Available from: 2015-06-25 Created: 2015-06-25 Last updated: 2016-01-12Bibliographically approved
Backman, E. (2015). Teaching trainee teachers about outdoor education. In: Humberstone, Barbara; Prince, Heather; Henderson, Karla A (Ed.), Routledge International Handbook of Outdoor Studies: (pp. 121-130). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teaching trainee teachers about outdoor education
2015 (English)In: Routledge International Handbook of Outdoor Studies / [ed] Humberstone, Barbara; Prince, Heather; Henderson, Karla A, London: Routledge, 2015, p. 121-130Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2015
Keywords
outdoor education
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4243 (URN)9781138782884 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-12-05 Created: 2015-12-05 Last updated: 2016-01-12Bibliographically approved
Backman, E., Larsson, H., Lundvall, S., Nyberg, M., Redelius, K. & Tidén, A. (2014). Bedömningsstöd i ämnet Idrott och hälsa: gymnasiet. Stockholm
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bedömningsstöd i ämnet Idrott och hälsa: gymnasiet
Show others...
2014 (Swedish)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, pages
Stockholm: , 2014. p. 30
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-3581 (URN)
Projects
Bedömningsstöd i skolämnet idrott och hälsa
Note

Ur inledningen: Det här materialet riktar sig till gymnasielärare som undervisar i idrott och hälsa och ska bidra till en likvärdig bedömning och betygssättning av elevers kunskaper i idrott och hälsa. Bedömningsstödet behandlar exempel från kursen idrott och hälsa 1.

Available from: 2014-11-29 Created: 2014-11-29 Last updated: 2016-09-19Bibliographically approved
Backman, E. (2014). En teorispäckad sociologisk analys av fritid och sport – ett ambitiöst projekt: recension av boken Leisure, Sports & Society av Karl Spracklen [Review]. Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum (14 november)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>En teorispäckad sociologisk analys av fritid och sport – ett ambitiöst projekt: recension av boken Leisure, Sports & Society av Karl Spracklen
2014 (Swedish)In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224, no 14 novemberArticle, book review (Other academic) Published
Abstract [sv]

I september 2014 bytte Leeds Metropolitan University, trots studentprotester, namn till Leeds Beckett University; universitetets första colleges låg i Beckett Park, vilken i sin tur fått namn efter bankiren och konservative parlamentsledamoten Ernest Beckett, 2nd Baron Grimthorpe (1856–1917), vars alma mater faktiskt var Trinity College, Cambridge. Leeds-studenternas motstånd hade sin grund i att namnändringen beräknades kosta en kvarts miljon pund, alltmedan inte minst universitetets idrottsanläggningar tillåtits förfalla. Vi vet inte hur universitetets personal ställde sig till namnförändringen, och särskilt nyfikna är vi ju på vad professorn i Leisure Studies (fritidsforskning, fritidsvetenskap) vid Leeds Beckett University, Karl Spracklen, tyckte om förändringen. Detta är dock blott "idle curiosity"; Spracklen är aktuell av ett helt annat, och viktigare, skäl, nämligen för sin bok Leisure, Sports & Society (Palgrave Macmillan). Spracklen, som är sociolog och vars forskningsintresse också inkluderar "metal music" (som sekreterare för International Society for Metal Music Studies och redaktör för Metal Music Studies) och "whiskey tourism" (som drivande i British Sociological Associations Alcohol Study Group) är en centralfigur inom det brittiska fritidsforskningsetablissemanget – han har bland annat varit ordförande i viktiga LSA, Leisure Studies Association från 2009 till 2013. Han har därtill en lång rad publikationer bakom sig, böcker, antologibidrag och vetenskapliga artiklar inom idrotts- och fritidsforskning i vid mening. Den nya boken ges här en grundlig recension av Erik Backman, som ju vet ett och annat om fritidsforskning, Spracklen bottnar teoretiskt i Habermas, i sig ovanligt bland brittiska forskare, men också i Marx, Weber och Bourdieu, bland andra, i sin utforskning av sambandet mellan fritid, fysisk aktivitet och sport ur ett tvärvetenskapligt perspektiv som innefattar idrottsvetenskap, sociologi, cultural studies, historia, filosofi och psykologi. Och vår recensent är imponerad över bredden, djupet och ambitionsnivån – även om det kan bli lite tjatigt från och till.

National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-3558 (URN)
Available from: 2014-11-17 Created: 2014-11-17 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4660-717X

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