Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH

Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Öhman, Marie
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 46) Show all publications
Quennerstedt, M., Öhman, M. & Öhman, J. (2021). Friluftsliv, health and quality of life: About friluftsliv as a method for health. In: Brügge, Britta; Glantz, Matz; Sandell, Klas; Lundqvist Jones, Therese; Szczepanski, Anders & Andersson, Per (Ed.), Friluftsliv explored: An environmental and outdoor teaching approach for knowledge, emotions and quality of life (pp. 203-216). Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Friluftsliv, health and quality of life: About friluftsliv as a method for health
2021 (English)In: Friluftsliv explored: An environmental and outdoor teaching approach for knowledge, emotions and quality of life / [ed] Brügge, Britta; Glantz, Matz; Sandell, Klas; Lundqvist Jones, Therese; Szczepanski, Anders & Andersson, Per, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press , 2021, p. 203-216Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2021
Series
Skrifter från Forum för utomhuspedagogik ; 4
Keywords
friluftsliv, health, wellbeing, quality of life
National Category
Educational Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7332 (URN)10.3384/9789179290665 (DOI)9789179290658 (ISBN)9789179290665 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-10-24 Created: 2022-10-24
Sund, L., Quennerstedt, M. & Öhman, M. (2019). The embodied social studies classroom: Repositioning the body in the social sciences in school. Cogent Education, 6(1), 1-21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The embodied social studies classroom: Repositioning the body in the social sciences in school
2019 (English)In: Cogent Education, E-ISSN 2331-186X, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Social studies have often been explored as dis-embodied which results in a limited view of what happens in the classroom. Based in Dewey’s transactional view of embodied relationality, Todd’s discussion on the liminality of pedagogical relationships and recent theoretical contributions into embodied learning and body pedagogics, the purpose is to explore students’ embodied engagement as an important but often overlooked aspect of social studies in school. The focus is on pedagogical encounters in terms of how students’ actions acquire a certain function in the classroom. Three embodied engagements— (i) disengaged encounters, (ii) screened encounters, and (iii) educative encounters—are identified and discussed in terms of the liminality of pedagogical encounters.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cogent OA, 2019
Keywords
embodied engagements, classroom practice, John Dewey, transaction, pedagogical encounters, liminality
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7344 (URN)10.1080/2331186X.2019.1569350 (DOI)000457403300001 ()
Available from: 2022-10-24 Created: 2022-10-24
Larsson, H., Quennerstedt, M., Caldeborg, A., Janemalm, L., Ridderlund, S., Segolsson, J., . . . Öhman, M. (2017). Teachers as researchers investigating their PE practice!. In: (Ed.), : . Paper presented at British Educational Research Association BERA-conference in University of Sussex, Brighton, 4th-7th sept 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teachers as researchers investigating their PE practice!
Show others...
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7235 (URN)
Conference
British Educational Research Association BERA-conference in University of Sussex, Brighton, 4th-7th sept 2017
Projects
Forskarskolan idrott och hälsas didaktik
Available from: 2022-10-24 Created: 2022-10-24
Sund, L., Quennerstedt, M. & Öhman, M. (2016). The Embodied Social Studies Classroom. In: (Ed.), : . Paper presented at ECER 2016, Leading Education: The Distinct Contributions of Educational Research and Researchers, Dublin, Ireland, 22-26 August, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Embodied Social Studies Classroom
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In recent years scholars interested in teaching and learning in social studies in schools have showed how learning in social studies classrooms can be understood through instruction, dialogue, cognition, reflection, concepts, thinking, writing, reading and awareness (cf. Bickmore & Parker, 2014; Brooks, 2011; Hess; 2002; Journell, Walker Beeson & Ayers, 2015; King, 2009; Nokes, 2014; Savenije, van Boxtel & Grever, 2014). Despite these important contributions, learning risks being limited to explorations of cognitive, verbal and/or written aspects of the educational situation. 

Learning is, however, very much also embodied, including the embodied interactions with the environment (cf. Shilling, 2000, Zembylas 2007), and research also reveals that secondary social studies is facing a crisis since a majority of students still are made to memorize and reproduce socioscientific knowledge instead of being prepared to use knowledge meaningfully and participating in public discussions (Sandahl 2015; Ljunggren et al. 2015; King 2009). Social studies have accordingly, as many other school subjects, often been handled as dis-embodied (Almqvist & Quennerstedt, 2015; Evans, Davies & Rich 2009), and this gives us a quite limited view of the learning going on in classrooms. The consequences of this gap in research as well as practice are that we miss out on important aspects of what Armour et al. (2015) argues to be “the dazzling complexity of the learning process” (p. 11).

In this presentation we aim to ‘transgress’ the separation of mind and body and explore embodied aspects of learning in the social studies classroom. With a point of departure in John Dewey’s transactional view of learning and Sharon Todd’s discussion on the liminality of pedagogical relationships, the ambition with the papers is not to explore ‘The Learning’ going on, or what every student learn in the explored situations. Instead, we argue that students always enter pedagogical encounters as some-body, and that it correspondingly is fruitful to explore students’ embodied engagements as an important but often overlooked aspect of the social studies classroom. The risk that remains is otherwise that social studies is treated as dis-embodied and that we as a consequence do not fully understand or embrace the potential of social studies.

Hence, the purpose of the study is to explore embodied engagements in a social sciences classroom. The focus in the study is on expected and potential pedagogical encounters and how students’ actions obtain a certain function in the classroom. As a conclusion we will discuss the results of our analysis in terms of the liminality of pedagogical encounters in classroom practice.

Our intent in this study is not to resolve tensions produced by theontological divide between representational and non-representational approachesor the epistemological separation of mind and body. Instead, by turning topragmatism and Dewey’s transactional perspective, we intend to approach socialstudies as embodied rather than dis-embodied. 

Method

By focusing on embodiment in a transactional perspective the attention is turned from bodies as a pre-determined metaphysical entity separated from the mind to what bodies do and become in and through transactions with the environment (Biesta & Tedder 2006; Garrison 2015). Taking a transactional approach, the study puts into focus the ‘lived’, embodied engagements with others (teachers, student peers) and the environment (classroom practice, classroom materiality) they engage in. The analysis is conducted in three steps; (i) distinguishing pedagogical encounters, (ii) identifying embodied engagements, and (iii) categorising embodied engagements by the function of actions-in-context. In this study we focus on situations where the body is foregrounded and the action is connected to subject matter. Accordingly, we are interested in both the pedagogical relation between teacher and students and the didactic relation between subject matter, instructional activities and teachers and students involved. This is described by Hudson (2015) as the didactic triadic that recognises the complex set of relations between teacher, student and content (Cf. Klette 2007). The study has no generalizing ambition since the data comes from a small sample, however, we hope that the insights that can be drawn from this case can be helpful in re-understanding social studies as embodied rather than dis-embodied. The empirical material consists of video recorded lessons from two different subject areas (Criminology and Sociology) in an upper secondary school in Sweden. The content of the lessons is small group activities, whole class lectures and student presentations. The class consisted of 31 students in their final year of the Business Management and Economics Programme. In exploring embodied engagements in a social sciences classroom several challenges arise. As Estola and Elbaz-Luwisch (2003) state “attention to the body is a challenge to both the researchers and the methods used” (p. 715). These challenges can be summarised as the difficulty in exploring the dazzling complexity of any educational situation involving verbal and non-verbal actions and communication, teachers and students, teaching aids, the materiality of the classroom as well as the context as a whole (Cf. Quennerstedt, Öhman & Öhman 2011). In order to handle this complexity the question that guided us in our analysis of our video recorded data was how aspects of embodied engagements manifest themselves in the social studies classroom. As a conclusion we will also discuss the results of our analysis in terms of the liminality of pedagogical encounters in classroom practice.

Expected Outcomes

In the analysis we have identified three embodied engagements in the social studies classroom: (i) disengaged encounters, (ii) screened encounters, (iii) collective inquiry. These embodied engagements describe functions that different actions-in-context have in transaction in the classroom. Each category describes different functional roles that teachers, students, classroom settings, tasks, etc. have in embodied engagements and the direction this takes in the pedagogical encounter. The categories are not mutually exclusive, but instead intertwined with each other in real situations.Disengaged encounters is about how students are made disengaged in transaction with others and the environment in terms of teacher led lessons, peer presentations or disengaging tasks.Screened encounters refer to embodied engagements being both focused towards screens (computers, smart-boards etc) and screened off in terms of how student interaction occurs.Collective inquiry is events when students actively (as some-body) engage in a collective, communicative process guided by conditions of uncertainty and change.These results will be clarified and discussed further in terms of the liminality of embodied engagements in classroom practice with reference to Todd (2014). Todd uses the metaphor of liminality, or the threshold, as a way of discussing that pedagogical relationships in education are “played out materially, between bodies in the present, unpredictably against a future that is always unknown” (p. 243) thus these pedagogical encounters have the potential to be transformative. The paper aims to contribute to earlier research on embodied aspects of learning in Sweden and Europe and to extend the methodological approaches currently in use within the field of subject didactics.

References

Almqvist, J. & Quennerstedt, M. (2015). Is there (any)body in science education? Interchange. A Quarterly review of Education, 46(4), pp 439-453.

Armour, K. Quennerstedt, M. Chambers, F & Makopoulou, K. (2015). What is ‘effective’ CPD for contemporary physical education teachers? A Deweyan framework. Sport, Education and Society, DOI:10.1080/13573322.2015.1083000.

Biesta, G.J.J. & Tedder, M. (2006). How is agency possible? Towards an ecological understanding of agency-as-achievement. Working paper 5, Exeter: The Learning Lives project.

Estola, E. & Elbaz-Luwisch, F. (2003). Teaching bodies at work. Journal of Curriculum Stuides, 35(6), pp. 697–719.

Evans, J., Davies, B. & Rich, E. (2009). The body made flesh: embodied learning and the corporeal device. British Journal of Sociology of Education, 30(4), 391-406.

Garrison, Jim (2015). Dewey’s Aesthetics of Body-Mind Functioning. Aesthetics and the Embodied Mind: Beyond Art Theory and the Cartesian Mind-Body Dichotomy. Alfonsina Scarinzi (ed.), Dordrecht: Springer.

Hess, D. E. (2002). Discussing Controversial Public Issues in Secondary Social Studies Classrooms: Learning from Skilled Teachers. Theory & Research in Social Education, 30(1), 10-41.

Hudson, B. (2015). The epistemology and methodology of curriculum: didactics. In The SAGE handbook of curriculum, pedagogy and assessment, edited by Wyse, Dominic, Hayward, Louise and Pandya, Jessica (eds.) Sage. 

Journell, W, Walker Beeson, M. & Ayers, C. A. (2015). Learning to Think Politically: Toward More Complete Disciplinary Knowledge in Civics and Government Courses. Theory & Research in Social Education, 43(1), pp. 28-67.

King, J. T. (2009). Teaching and Learning about Controversial Issues: Lessons from Northern Ireland, Theory & Research in Social Education, 37(2), pp. 215-246.

Klette, K. (2007). Trends in Research on Teaching and Learning in Schools: didactics meets classroom studies. European Educational Research Journal (online), 6(2), pp. 147-161.

Quennerstedt, M., Öhman, J. & Öhman, M. (2011) Investigating learning in physical education – a transactional approach. Sport, Education and Society, 16:2, 159-177.

Savenije, G. M., van Boxtel C. & Grever, M. (2014). Learning about Sensitive History: “Heritage” of Slavery as a Resource. Theory & Research in Social Education, 42(4), pp. 516-547.

Schilling, C. (2000). The Body. In G. Browning, A. Halcli, & F. Webster (Eds.), Understanding contemporary society: Theories of the present. (pp. 415-432). London: SAGE Publications Ltd.

Todd, S. (2014). Between Body and Spirit: The Liminality of Pedagogical Relationships. Journal of Philosophy of Education, 48(2), pp. 231-245.

Zembylas, M. (2007). The specters of bodies and affects in the classroom: a rhizo‐ethological approach, Pedagogy, Culture & Society, 15(1), pp.19-35.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7343 (URN)
Conference
ECER 2016, Leading Education: The Distinct Contributions of Educational Research and Researchers, Dublin, Ireland, 22-26 August, 2016
Available from: 2022-10-24 Created: 2022-10-24
Maivorsdotter, N., Quennerstedt, M. & Öhman, M. (2015). Students’ Aesthetic Experiences of Playing Exergames: A Practical Epistemology Analysis of Learning. International Journal of Games Based Learning, 5(3), 11-24
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Students’ Aesthetic Experiences of Playing Exergames: A Practical Epistemology Analysis of Learning
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Games Based Learning, ISSN 2155-6849, E-ISSN 2155-6857, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 11-24Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to explore Swedish junior high school students meaning-making of participating in exergaming in school based on their aesthetic judgments during game play. A transactional approach, drawing on the work of John Dewey, was used in the study and the data consisted of video- and audio recordings of ongoing video gaming. A practical epistemology analysis (PEA) was used in order to explore the students’ meaning-making in depth. When analyzing the data, the importance of performing well in relation to the challenges the game offers; developing techniques suitable for the game; and interacting socially with one’s peers emerged as main themes in the students’ meaning-making and learning. It was clear that the students’ taste for gaming played a crucial role in how they proceeded in the activity and that meaningful gaming included an intrinsic combination of pleasure and displeasure. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
USA: IGI Global, 2015
Keywords
Exergames, Meaning-making, Learning, Aesthetic judgments, Practical Epistemology Analysis
National Category
Pedagogy Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7246 (URN)10.4018/IJGBL.2015070102 (DOI)000218933000002 ()2-s2.0-84931838794 (Scopus ID)
Projects
TV-spel som hälsofostran
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2010-4756
Available from: 2022-10-24 Created: 2022-10-24
Redelius, K., Quennerstedt, M. & Öhman, M. (2014). Communicating aims and outcomes in PE: part of a subject for learning?. In: (Ed.), : . Paper presented at AIESEP World Congress 10-13 February 2014, Auckland, New Zealand.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communicating aims and outcomes in PE: part of a subject for learning?
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7334 (URN)
Conference
AIESEP World Congress 10-13 February 2014, Auckland, New Zealand
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2022-10-24 Created: 2022-10-24
Almqvist, J., Quennerstedt, M. & Öhman, M. (2014). How Wii teach Physical Education and Health. In: (Ed.), : . Paper presented at BERA - British Educational Research Association, Annual Conference, Institute of Education, London, 23rd - 25th September 2014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Wii teach Physical Education and Health
2014 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background

The potential use of exergames in Physical Education and Health is surrounded by a growing discussion among practitioners, policy makers and researchers focusing on different expectations about the games. In this discussion there is, however, a need to further include issues about the learning content offered by these games, how the content is expected to be taught and about the potential consequences the use of games may have for learning and socialisation. This study focus on how meanings about health and the human body are offered by the game: What kind of teaching is delegated to the artifact when used in Physical Education and Health?

Focus of inquiry

The aim of this article is to investigate how images of health and the human body and are taught by using exergames.

Analytical framework and Research methods

The empirical study builds on the use of an analytical tool called “Epistemological move analysis”. Studies of teaching and learning have shown how teachers use different kinds of actions (for example instructive, confirming, re-orienting, generative, re-constructive and evaluative moves) in order to try to direct the meaning making in educational settings. In this study, these categories are used, developed and specified in the context of teaching in Physical Education and Health. The empirical material used consists of video recordings from sessions where the games Wii Fit Plus and EA Sports Active were played.

Research findings

The results of the analyses show how the games offer different kinds of epistemological moves: Instructive moves about the fit body and how to play the game, re-orienting moves used in order to help the players to modify their action towards a more relevant and effective way, generative moves used to help the players to think about how to play the game and confirming move about the players’ gaming. In sum, the “teacher” constituted in the game is a teachers who instructs, confirms and encourages the players to move and exercise their bodies. But it is not a teacher who, in contrast to teaching in other contexts, is able to help the learners to make investigations or to participate in argumentation and discussion about for example images of health and the human body. Teaching in these games is constituted as a behavioral modification focused on an idea about a pre-defined and ideal body not expected to be discussed in education.

National Category
Social Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7170 (URN)
Conference
BERA - British Educational Research Association, Annual Conference, Institute of Education, London, 23rd - 25th September 2014
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2022-10-24 Created: 2022-10-24
Larsson, H., Annerstedt, C., Barker, D., Karlefors, I., Quennerstedt, M., Redelius, K. & Öhman, M. (2014). Idrott och hälsa: ett ämne för lärande?. In: (Ed.), Resultatdialog 2014: (pp. 120-128). Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Idrott och hälsa: ett ämne för lärande?
Show others...
2014 (Swedish)In: Resultatdialog 2014, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2014, p. 120-128Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [sv]

Skolämnet idrott och hälsa kallas sedan 1994 allt oftare för ett ”kunskapsämne”. Eleverna ska bland annat utveckla allsidiga rörelseförmågor och lära sig plane- ra, genomföra och värdera rörelseaktiviteter ur olika hälsoperspektiv. Samtidigt har kritik mot undervisningens utformning rests i utvärderingar, inspektioner och forskning. Kritiken gäller bland annat en stark betoning på ”att pröva på” olika fysiska aktiviteter och att undervisningen inte ger eleverna möjligheter att ut- veckla kunskaper i någon djupare mening. Samtidigt framhåller lärare omstän- digheter som försvårar sådan kunskapsutveckling. I den här artikeln redovisas resultat från forskningsprojektet ”Idrott och hälsa – ett ämne för lärande?”, vars syfte var att undersöka undervisnings- och lärprocesser i ämnet.

Referenser

Annerstedt, C. & Redelius, K. (2014) Exploring the relationship between rhetoric and reality with regards to assessment in PE. Presentation vid AIESEP-konferensen i Auckland, Nya Zeeland, 2014-02-11.

Barker, D., Annerstedt, C. & Quennerstedt, M. (kommande) Learning through group work in Physical Education: A symbolic interactionistic ap- proach. Manuskript avsett för publicering i tidskriften Sport, Education and Society.

Barker, D., Quennerstedt, M. & Annerstedt, C. (2013) Inter-student in- teractions and student learning in health and physical education: a post-Vygotskian analysis, Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, DOI: 10.1080/17408989.2013.868875

Bernstein, B. (1977) Class codes and control, towards a theory of educational transmissions. London: Routledge and Keegan Paul.

Karlefors, I. & Larsson, H. (kommande) Teaching Methods in Physical Edu- cation. Manuskript avsett för publicering i vetenskaplig tidskrift.

Kirk, D. (1996). The sociocultural foundations of human movement. Melbourne: Macmillan Education.

Larsson, H. & Karlefors, I. (kommande) Movement Cultures in Physical Education. Manuskript avsett för publicering i tidskriften Sport, Educa- tion and Society.

Larsson, H., Quennerstedt, M. & Öhman, M. (2014) Heterotopias in Physical Education: Towards a Queer Pedagogy? Gender and Education, 26(2), 135- 150.

Quennerstedt, M., Annerstedt, C., Barker, D., Karlefors, I., Larsson, H., Re- delius, K. & Öhman, M. (2014) What did they learn in school today? A method for exploring aspects of learning in physical education. European Physical Education Review, 20(2), 282-302.

Redelius, K., Quennerstedt, M. & Öhman, M. (kommande) Communicating aims and learning outcomes – part of the teaching practice in physical education? Manuskript avsett för publicering i tidskriften Sport, Educa- tion and Society.

Wertsch, J. V. (1998). Mind as action. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet, 2014
Keywords
Idrott och hälsa, lärande, lärandeteori, lärandeobjekt, undervisningsmetoder, idrottsdidaktik, bedömning av kunskaper, normer, grupparbete
National Category
Educational Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7228 (URN)978-91-7307-247-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-10-24 Created: 2022-10-24
Larsson, H., Annerstedt, C., Barker, D., Karlefors, I., Quennerstedt, M., Redelius, K. & Öhman, M. (2014). Physical education: a subject for learning?. In: (Ed.), : . Paper presented at AIESEP World Congress 10-13 February 2014, Auckland, New Zealand.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical education: a subject for learning?
Show others...
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7229 (URN)
Conference
AIESEP World Congress 10-13 February 2014, Auckland, New Zealand
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2022-10-24 Created: 2022-10-24
Quennerstedt, M. & Öhman, M. (2014). Salutogenic approaches to health and the body. In: Katie Fitzpatcrick & Richard Tinning (Ed.), Health education: Critical perspectives (pp. 190-203). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Salutogenic approaches to health and the body
2014 (English)In: Health education: Critical perspectives / [ed] Katie Fitzpatcrick & Richard Tinning, London: Routledge , 2014, p. 190-203Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2014
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7324 (URN)9780415815956 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-10-24 Created: 2022-10-24
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications