Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH

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Quennerstedt, MikaelORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8748-8843
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Tolgfors, B., Quennerstedt, M., Backman, E. & Nyberg, G. (2023). A PE teacher’s tale: journeying from teacher education to teaching practice in physical education. Sport, Education and Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A PE teacher’s tale: journeying from teacher education to teaching practice in physical education
2023 (English)In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

As part of a longitudinal research project on the transition from physical education teacher education (PETE) to school physical education (PE) in Sweden and exploring whether and how PETE matters, this article uses narrative inquiry to ‘represent’ a PE teacher’s professional journey from PETE to the induction phase of PE teaching. The study focuses on his use of, and reflections on, ‘assessment for learning’ (AfL) at different stages of his teaching experience. The purpose of the study is to contribute knowledge about how positive experiences of AfL during PETE can enable the use of AfL in school PE for a newly qualified teacher. This is done by analysing one male PETE student’s reflections on AfL in the context of a campus-based course on PE assessment, his use of and reflections on AfL during his practicum, and in school PE as a newly qualified teacher. The data generation consisted of recordings of a PETE seminar, a stimulated recall interview with the participant during his final school placement, and two interviews with him in his role as a newly qualified PE teacher at two different schools. Through the PE teacher’s tale, we show how the campus-based course on PE assessment in PETE and the student teacher’s positive experience of using AfL during his practicum seem to have inspired him in his later positions. The results are discussed in relation to the perspective of occupational socialisation theory. This narrative inquiry suggests that PETE can make a difference for student teachers who are prepared to face the challenges of the induction phase of PE teaching and are able to navigate between the barriers that get in their way. We conclude the paper with some considerations regarding the study’s potential strength (trustworthiness), sharing (transferability) and service (usefulness).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
Keywords
Transitions, narrative inquiry, occupational socialisation theory, assessment for learning, physical education teacher education, teaching, learning
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7969 (URN)10.1080/13573322.2023.2281389 (DOI)001103563500001 ()
Projects
Transitions from Physical Education Teacher Education to School PE
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 218-03626
Available from: 2023-11-30 Created: 2023-11-30 Last updated: 2023-11-30
Backman, E., Quennerstedt, M., Tolgfors, B. & Nyberg, G. (2023). Activating students as resources in physical education teacher education – a complex process making social and physical capital visible.. In: : . Paper presented at European Conference on Educational Research, Glasgow, 22-25 August 2023.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Activating students as resources in physical education teacher education – a complex process making social and physical capital visible.
2023 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

It is well established that students in higher education need to develop evaluative skills in order to become effective learners (Guest & Riegler 2022). Assessment for Learning (AfL) is a model for assessment that strengthens learning in schools as well as in higher education (Black et al 2002). This is also the case in physical education teacher education (PETE) (Eather et al 2017, Macken et al 2020) and in school physical education (Leirhaug 2016). One of the key learning strategies in AfL is to activate peers as resources for learning, often operationalised as peer assessment. In PETE, peer assessment (or peer-assisted learning in a broader meaning) has proven to strengthen learning for both the observer and the observed (Lamb et al 2012). 

One dimension of peer assessment, that has only scarcely been covered in the PETE context (Macken et al 2020) but that is more highlighted in research of peer assessment in general teacher education (see e.g. Kilic 2016, Tait-McCutcheon & Bernadette Knewstubb 2018), is the tensions inherent in giving feedback to peers on their work, peers who might also often be friends. According to Kilic (2016, 137) preservice teachers “do not feel comfortable when critiquing another student” and Tait-McCutcheon and Knewstubb (2018, 773) argues that “peer assessment could reflect friendships more than learning outcomes”. 

Research demonstrates a complexity with regards to the potential for peer assessment in PETE. On the one hand, preservice teachers have expressed that giving feedback to peers creates a positive, safe, equal and relaxed learning environment (Lamb et al., 2012) and peer assessment has been reported to improve competence, confidence and self-efficacy among preservice teachers (Eather et al., 2017). On the other hand, a study by Macken et al. (2020) reported that preservice teachers believe their students would be mean to each other if implementing peer assessment during their school placement practice in PETE.

In this paper, we aim to further explore the complexity involved in peer assessment in PETE to get a deepened and more differentiated picture of this phenomenon. Our overall aim is to contribute to more knowledge about how to involve  preservice teachers in PETE and students in school physical education as resources for learning without risking to cause harm. Drawing on the call from Scanlon et al. (2022) for more studies on how assessment is taught in PETE, our specific aim in this paper is to investigate preservice teachers’ views on what as well as how peer assessment is taught in PETE, to be used in school physical education. We will use Pierre Bourdieu’s (1990) concept of capital, as well as the work of Hay and Penney (2013) on how accountability mechanisms functions in assessment, in order to analyse what is assigned value in peer assessment. The two questions that will guide our analysis in this paper reads: What mechanisms are assigned value in peer assessment according to preservice teachers in PETE? And: How do the mechanisms that are assigned value in peer assessment in PETE function according to preservice teachers? More knowledge about the what and the how in teaching of assessment practices in PETE can improve these practices within school physical education.

Methodology

The study presented in this paper is conducted as part of a greater project with the aim of exploring how PETE matters for school physical education. In the overall project we have recruited preservice teachers, with physical education as one of their subjects, during their last year in teacher education. During this last year, one campus-placed course in assessment and one school placement course, constituted the contexts from which we collected empirical material to this study (Authors 2021).  

The participants in this study were 21 preservice teachers from two different PETE institutions in Sweden (10 from uni A and 11 from uni B). The empirical material analysed in this study compriced of: 

  1. Three audio-recorded seminars (90-120 min each) from the campus-based assessment courses (one seminar from uni A and two from uni B) conducted before the preservice teachers’ school placement studies.
  2. Seven individual semi-structured interviews (40-70 min each) (Kvale 1996) conducted during visits at the preservice teachers’ school placement studies (all from uni A).
  3. Five individual Stimulated Recall (SR)-interviews conducted during visits at the preservice teachers’ school placement studies (one from A, four from B).
  4. Two audio-recorded and semi-structured group interviews (40-60 min each) (Kvale 1996) from the campus-based assessment courses (both from A) conducted after the school placement studies. 

After having had the empirical material transcribed by an external part, a thematic content analysis was initiated by a process of familiarisation in which all four researchers were engaged (Braun et al 2017). Inspired by an abductive approach (Alvesson & Sköldberg 2017), we allowed ourselves to be open to alternative theories that could help explain the empirical material. The choice of research object was initiated by the impression from the interviews that giving feedback to peers is surrounded by a complexity, both in PETE and in school physical education. The identification of social relationships and certain types of bodies and movements as assigned with value when giving feedback to peers guided our attention towards Bourdieu-inspired interpretations of the social capital (Beames & Atencio 2008) and the physical capital (Redelius & Hay 2010).   

Educational challenges following when ‘the what’ is reflected in ‘the how’

The findings indicate that when the what-aspect of ‘social relationships’ is to be implemented into an how-aspect, the preservice teachers calls for continuous interaction ‘over time’ in order to build a safe and an allowing climate for learning. While this interaction can be implemented in PETE and in school physical education, allowing for school children to build social capital (Beames & Atencio 2008), a result from this study that calls for further discussion is how PETE can make continuous interaction between preservice teachers and school students possible during school placement studies. 

When the what-aspect of ‘articulating what to learn’ is mirrored in relation to the how-aspect of giving ‘correct feedback’ in peer assessment, this displays that physical capital in school physical education is strongly connected to standards of excellence and norms of right and wrong movement technique (Redelius & Hay 2010). These golden norms seem to be upheld by the displayed lack a common language for learning (Larsson & Redelius 2008). A question following from this study is what resources preservice teachers are offered within PETE to embody a language for learning in school physical education? 

This study also made visible that ‘the emphasis of certain forms of knowledge ’ is highly valued when preservice teachers are to give feedback to their peers, to their students (during school placement) or when they engage students to give feedback to each other.  The preservice teachers claim to handle this ‘what-aspect’ of peer assessment by focus their attention on ‘managing the sensitivity’ arising when themselves or their students are to comment on each others’ bodies in movements. 

In conclusion, the combination of social and physical capital decides what is possible to say to whom when preservice teachers and students are to give feedback to peers in PETE and in school physical education.

References

Alvesson M and Sköldberg K (2017) Tolkning och Reflektion. Vetenskapsfilosofi och Kvalitativ Metod [Interpretation and Reflection. Philosophy of Science and Qualitative Method]. Lund: Studentlitteratur. [In Swedish.]

Beames, Simon and Atencio, Matthew (2008)'Building social capital through outdoor education', Journal of Adventure Education & Outdoor Learning,8:2,99 — 112

Black, P., C. Harrison, C. Lee, B. Marshall, and D. Wiliam. 2002. Working Inside the Black Box. Assessment for Learning in the Classroom. London: GL Assessment

Bourdieu, P. (1990). The logic of practice. (Richard Nice, Trans.). Cambridge, MA: Polity Press.

Eather, N., Riley, N., Miller, D., Jones, B. (2017) Evaluating the Effectiveness of Using Peer-Dialogue Assessment for Improving Pre-Service Teachers' Perceived Confidence and Competence to Teach Physical Education. Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 

Guest J & Riegler R (2022) Knowing HE standards: how good are students at evaluating academic work?, Higher Education Research & Development, 41:3, 714-728

Hay, P. J., and D. Penney. 2013. Assessment in Physical Education. A Sociocultural Perspective. London: Routledge.

Kilic, D. (2016) An Examination of Using Self-, Peer-, and Teacher-Assessment in Higher Education: A Case Study in Teacher Education, Higher Education Studies, 6(1), 136-144. 

Kvale, Steinar (1996). Interviews. An Introduction to Qualitative Research Interviewing. California: Sage Publications.

Lamb P Lane K & Aldous D (2012) Enhancing the spaces of reflection: A buddy peer-review process within physical education initial teacher education, European Physical Education Review 19(1) 21–38

Larsson H & Redelius K (2008) Swedish physical education research questioned—current situation and future directions, Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 13:4, 381-398, DOI: 10.1080/17408980802353354

Leirhaug 2016 Exploring the relationship between student grades and assessment for learning in Norwegian physical education, European Physical Education Review, 22(3) 298–314

Macken S, MacPhail, A & Calderon, A (2020) Exploring primary pre-service teachers’ use of ‘assessment for learning’ while teaching primary physical education during school placement, Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 25:5, 539-554

Redelius, K. & Hay, P. (2010) Defining, acquiring and transacting cultural capital through assessment in physical education, European Physical Education Review, 5(3):275–294:

Scanlon D, MacPhail, A Walsh C & Tannehill D (2022): Embedding assessment in learning experiences: enacting the principles of instructional alignment in physical education teacher education, Curriculum Studies in Health and Physical Education, epub ahead of print

Tait-McCutcheon S & Knewstubb, B. (2018) Evaluating the alignment of self, peer and lecture assessment in an Aotearoa New Zealand pre-service teacher education course, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 43:5, 772-785

 

National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7814 (URN)
Conference
European Conference on Educational Research, Glasgow, 22-25 August 2023
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2023-09-11 Created: 2023-09-25
Williams, B. & Quennerstedt, M. (2023). Dining with Michel Serres: physical education and an ethics of the parasite. Sport, Education and Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dining with Michel Serres: physical education and an ethics of the parasite
2023 (English)In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Presented as a six-course meal, this article addresses the ethics of innovations, interruptions, and intrusions in physical education (PE). The central ingredient in this meal is Michel Serres' character-concept of the parasite. We begin by interpreting debates about PE's purposes, futures, beneficiaries, and so on, as offering researchers and practitioners food-for-thought about the status quo in PE and its transformation. We then introduce the tastes and textures of the parasite and explore these flavours further using PE research on outsourcing and the use of healthy lifestyle technologies. In the main course, we propose a situated and symbiotic parasitic ethics grounded in hesitation and discuss what this set of sensitivities offers debates in PE about outsourcing and healthy lifestyle technology-use. Recognising there will never be a PE without parasites, we advocate an attunement to what it is to parasite well in PE and to the role of the parasite in the composition of any PE collective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
Keywords
Physical education, Michel serres, The parasite, Ethics, Outsourcing, External providers, Healthy lifestyle technologies, Exergames, Activity trackers, >
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Educational Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7737 (URN)10.1080/13573322.2023.2235612 (DOI)001028471600001 ()
Available from: 2023-08-29 Created: 2023-08-29 Last updated: 2023-08-29
Varea, V., Barker, D., Caldeborg, A. & Quennerstedt, M. (2023). Encounters with health education - tensions and potentials for newly arrived students in Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at AARE - Australian Association for Research in Education, 26 - 30 November 2023, Melbourne, Australia.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Encounters with health education - tensions and potentials for newly arrived students in Sweden
2023 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The health of migrants is an international concern. Health education is one way in which states attempt to address this concern. Research suggests however, that health assumes different meanings in different cultures, which makes health education a complex and potentially challenging endeavour. This presentation is part of a project that focuses on newly arrived school aged immigrants’ encounters with health education in different school subjects in Sweden. The overall purpose of this presentation is to develop an understanding of what happens when school aged immigrants experience health education in the school subjects that contain health in Sweden: physical education and health, home and consumer studies, biology, and social studies.

In this study, we worked with 20 immigrant students aged 15-19 with different backgrounds. Their country of origin included Eritrea, Iran, Kenya, Bosnia, Somalia, Congo, Nigeria, Syria, Ethiopia, Pakistan, Gambia, among others. The participants had migrated to Sweden for various reasons although most sought a less risky, more prosperous life. To generate data, we presented the participants with photographs and vignettes during interviews. The participants were invited to comment on the photographs and talk about issues related to health, wellbeing, fitness and lifestyle. Participants were also presented with several short scenarios about different conceptions of health and wellbeing being used in educational settings. The participants were asked to appraise the situations, and describe how the scenarios were relevant to their experiences of health education.

Five general trends in the data were identified: (1) The participants learned about certain dimensions of health outside of school. Health education was not the only, and sometimes not the main, source of knowledge; (2) Physical health as fitness was the least contentious, most recognizable dimension of health; (3) Some participants missed a spiritual dimension of health in Swedish schooling; (4) A number of participants disagreed with aspects of Swedish health education, notably in topics related to sex, sexualities, and relationships.  

While research on health and health education frames newly arrived students as deficient, our findings suggest that newly arrived students often have a critical distance towards health education and are able to critique health education concepts. At the same time, in order for health education to be a collaborative process, there appears to be a need for practitioners to work across the school-family boundary, also acknowledging young people with different cultural backgrounds as resources in health education.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7997 (URN)
Conference
AARE - Australian Association for Research in Education, 26 - 30 November 2023, Melbourne, Australia
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2023-12-15 Created: 2023-12-15 Last updated: 2023-12-20
Barker, D., Quennerstedt, M., Johansson, A. & Korp, P. (2023). Fit for the job? How corporeal expectations shape physical education teachers' understandings of content, pedagogy, and the purposes of physical education. Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 28(1), 29-42
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fit for the job? How corporeal expectations shape physical education teachers' understandings of content, pedagogy, and the purposes of physical education
2023 (English)In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 29-42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: People often expect physical education teachers to look fit and athletic, to do lots of physical activity, and to eat well. While ample research exists on physical education teachers' bodies, relatively few scholars have investigated how physical educators relate corporeal expectations to broader ideas about subject content, pedagogy, and the purposes of the school subject.

Aim: The specific aim of the paper is to identify the assumptions about content, pedagogy, and educational purposes that teachers make when they talk about a perceived need for physical educators to look fit and athletic.

Method: To frame our work theoretically, we draw from a Swedish didaktik of physical education tradition and employ Bakhtin's concept of speech genres, and Wertsch's concept of privileging. Our empirical material consists of transcripts generated from 6 focus group and 6 individual interviews (24 teachers in total, average age of 40 years, average teaching experience 11 years).

Findings: Data suggest that when teachers use an 'athletic-looking teacher as healthy role model' speech genre, they tend to privilege: (1) a particular version of health as subject content that involves not being too overweight and maintaining physical functionality in sports. This content is based on biomedical conceptions of health which foreground exercise, eating and weight, and a pathogenic reduction of risk; (2) particular pedagogies in PE that put the teacher at the centre of the pedagogical situation, and; (3) a certain educational purpose in PE, which is to educate citizens for healthy lives through participation in sport. With respect to this purpose, increasing body weight enters the genre as a potential obstacle for educational success.

Discussion: The findings raise questions concerning appropriate curricular content and its relation to teacher identities. They suggest that learning possibilities may be missed when certain content, pedagogies, and outcomes are privileged. The findings also indicate how wider voices are implicated in the speech genre.

Conclusion: The paper is concluded with reflections on the possibility for change regarding expectations of physical education teachers' bodies and pedagogies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
Keywords
Didaktik, teachers, weight, bodies, content
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7184 (URN)10.1080/17408989.2021.1934664 (DOI)000657161900001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-03476
Available from: 2022-10-24 Created: 2022-10-24 Last updated: 2023-05-19
Backman, E., Tolgfors, B., Nyberg, G. & Quennerstedt, M. (2023). How does physical education teacher education matter?: A methodological approach to understanding transitions from PETE to school physical education. Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 28(4), 411-424
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How does physical education teacher education matter?: A methodological approach to understanding transitions from PETE to school physical education
2023 (English)In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 411-424Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In this paper, we will address the question of how physical education teacher education (PETE) matters and suggest one way to explore the potential impact of PETE. A distinguishing feature of the studies of PETE's impact on physical education is that they either include perspectives from preservice teachers involved in PETE courses or perspectives from physical education teachers in schools looking back at their education. Longitudinal attempts to follow preservice teachers’ journey from education to workplace, in order to grasp how they perceive the relation between teacher education and teaching practice in schools, and the transition between these contexts, are few and far between. This gap of knowledge is a missing piece of the puzzle to further develop PETE, and to inform life-long professional development for teachers.

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, we develop and present a methodological approach for investigating the transition of content areas from courses in PETE into teaching practice in school physical education. Second, we will illustrate the potential utility of this methodological approach in longitudinal studies by showing how one particular content area, Assessment for Learning (AfL), was investigated through the use of methods and theories described in the first part of this paper.

Methodology: The suggested longitudinal approach involves Stimulated Recall (SR) interviews with pre- and postservice teachers, observations and communication with groups of students and teachers through social media. The construction, recontextualisation and realisation of pedagogic discourses regarding content areas are suggested to be analysed through a combination of Bernstein's concept of the pedagogic device and Ball's concept of fabrication.

Results and Conclusions: The longitudinal design and the suggested methodology can provide answers to how content areas are transformed in and between PETE and school physical education. A combination of the theoretical perspectives of Bernstein and Ball enables us to say something not only about how pedagogic discourses regarding content areas are constructed, recontextualised and realised in PETE and school physical education, but also about what content areas become in terms of fabrications in the transition between these contexts. To conclude, we argue that the methodological research design can be used to explore different content areas in PETE and that this methodology can contribute to knowledge about how PETE matters for school physical education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
Keywords
Longitudinal research design, preservice teachers, newly qualified teachers
National Category
Pedagogy Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7176 (URN)10.1080/17408989.2021.1990248 (DOI)000711281800001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish National Centre for Research in Sports
Available from: 2022-10-24 Created: 2022-10-24 Last updated: 2023-06-26
Geidne, S., Ericson, H. & Quennerstedt, M. (2023). Idrottsföreningen som hälsofrämjande arena: Från fysisk aktivitet till hållbart idrottande – en fråga om hur!. Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, 100(4), 589-600
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Idrottsföreningen som hälsofrämjande arena: Från fysisk aktivitet till hållbart idrottande – en fråga om hur!
2023 (Swedish)In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 100, no 4, p. 589-600Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [sv]

I årtionden har begreppen folkhälsa, hälsa och hälsofrämjande använts i relation till idrott på många sätt i såväl praktik, forskning som i policy. Att idrotten har någon slags betydelse för och koppling till folkhälsan torde vara helt klarlagt. Men hur kan vi förstå relationen eller kanske snarare relationerna mellan idrott och folkhälsa? Ett forskningsområde som tar tag i relationen idrott och folkhälsa och som också breddar vad relationen kan bestå av är forskningsfältet idrotten som hälsofrämjande arena (Health promoting sports clubs). I artikeln kommer vi därför att med utgångspunkt i forskning om idrotten som hälsofrämjande arena teoretisera relationen idrott - folkhälsa. Vi kommer därigenom diskutera och illustrera hur vi på fler än ett sätt kan öka förståelsen för idrotten som hälsofrämjande för så många som möjligt så länge som möjligt.

Keywords
arena-ansats, hållbarhet, idrott hela livet, idrott för alla, HPSC
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7926 (URN)
Available from: 2023-10-25 Created: 2023-10-25 Last updated: 2023-10-25
Korp, P., Quennerstedt, M., Barker, D. & Johansson, A. (2023). Making sense of health in PE: conceptions of health among Swedish physical education teachers. Health Education, 123(2), 79-92
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making sense of health in PE: conceptions of health among Swedish physical education teachers
2023 (English)In: Health Education, ISSN 0965-4283, E-ISSN 1758-714X, Vol. 123, no 2, p. 79-92Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

Over the last couple of decades, health has become a central part of the subject content in physical education (PE) curricula in many countries. As a result, issues of health have been foregrounded much more clearly in the teaching of PE. The aim of this study was to explore how Swedish PE teachers make sense of health in relation to their teaching practices. This was done through investigating conceptions and theories about health in the teachers' descriptions of their teaching practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The data analyzed in this paper were collected through focus group and individual interviews with PE teachers in the grades 7-9 within compulsory schools in Sweden. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis.

Findings

Four dominant themes were identified in the data: 1) Health as a healthy attitude, 2) Health as a functional ability, 3) Health as fitness, 4) Health as mental wellbeing. There is a clear impact from healthism and obesity discourses on the teachers' accounts of health, but there is also an impact from holistic views and approaches to health. The authors contend that teachers should be explicit in what they mean by health in relation to what they teach, how they teach and why they teach health in a certain way.

Originality/value

The knowledge produced by this study is crucial since teachers' assumptions regarding health affect the subject content (what), the pedagogies (how), as well as the reasons (why) they teach health and therefore what students learn regarding health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2023
Keywords
Conceptions of health, Physical education, Subject content, Interviews, Thematic analysis
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Educational Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7777 (URN)10.1108/HE-11-2022-0086 (DOI)001039097000001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2023-09-13 Created: 2023-09-13 Last updated: 2023-09-13
Backman, E., Quennerstedt, M., Tolgfors, B. & Nyberg, G. (2023). Peer assessment in physical education teacher education - a complex process making social and physical capital visible. Curriculum studies in health and physical education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Peer assessment in physical education teacher education - a complex process making social and physical capital visible
2023 (English)In: Curriculum studies in health and physical education, ISSN 2574-2981Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Peer assessment has been proven to improve learning for both the observer and the observed. One dimension of peer assessment that has been given little attention in the context of physical education teacher education (PETE) is the tension that exists when peers give feedback on each other's work. In this paper, we report on Swedish preservice teachers' (PST) views on peer assessment used in PETE school placements. Our findings reveal four mechanisms of peer assessment assigned value in PETE: (i) building social relations, (ii) making 'what to learn' visible, (iii) giving correct feedback, and (iv) handling sensitive and gendered comments. Inspired by Bourdieu, we discuss learning potentials and complex challenges with peer assessment, where the combination of social capital and physical capital decides what is possible to say and to whom when peer assessment is used in the PETE school placement and in school physical education (PE).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Physical education teacher education, peer assessment, social capital, physical capital
National Category
Pedagogy Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7890 (URN)10.1080/25742981.2023.2256327 (DOI)001061422700001 ()
Available from: 2023-10-05 Created: 2023-10-05 Last updated: 2023-10-05
Bjørke, L. & Quennerstedt, M. (2023). Reflecting on student reflections in physical education practice: moving beyond a theory-and-practice divide. Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 1-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reflecting on student reflections in physical education practice: moving beyond a theory-and-practice divide
2023 (English)In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background

Although the theory/practice dualism seems difficult to deal with in physical education (PE) practice, this paper posits that there are ways in which teachers can enable students to develop holistic competencies that encapsulate elements of both theoretical and practical knowledge. We therefore seek to rethink the relationship between theory and practice in PE practice and present ways in which PE teachers can connect these forms of knowledge with their students. We do so by looking at one of the historically most favoured means of bridging theory and practice: reflection.

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute with knowledge about student reflection in PE practice. First, we discuss the concept of reflection to clarify how student reflection might be understood in the embodied and situated context of PE practice. Then, we reconceptualise reflection in a way that might enable teachers to bridge the gap between theory and practice in new and hopefully fruitful ways with their students.

Theory and methods

We draw on various theoretical traditions on reflection to present a reconceptualisation of reflection that encapsulates the practical, situated and embodied nature of PE.

Theoretical discussion

We present the following four key ideas pertaining to reflection that together create a framework for conceptualising student reflection in the PE context: 1) Why reflection is important: a matter of intelligent practice; 2) Students must learn to reflect – in relation to what?; 3) What should students reflect on?; and 4) The how questions: creating conditions for reflections through indeterminate situations. Drawing on these four key ideas, we present an example of how our theoretical discussions can form the following three intertwined principles for a pedagogy of student reflection in PE practice for PE teachers moving beyond a theory-and-practice divide in PE: 1) a pedagogy of becoming through reflection; 2) a pedagogy of reflecting on the plurality of embodied and situated meaning; and 3) a reflective pedagogy of enquiry and discovery.

Conclusion

Throughout this paper, we argue that students need to learn to reflect, we suggested how reflection could be facilitated and we proposed that the why(s), what(s) and how(s) should be the objects of student reflection in PE. It is necessary to highlight that our suggestions for a pedagogy of student reflection are not complete nor definite but could serve as points of departure for future discussions of student reflection in PE.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
physical education, pedagogy, reflection, theory, practice
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7973 (URN)10.1080/17408989.2023.2281913 (DOI)001100492500001 ()
Available from: 2023-12-01 Created: 2023-12-01 Last updated: 2023-12-12
Projects
SMOVE Doctoral Programme of Sustainable Movement Education [VR 2021-00520]; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIHGender in motion – movement possibilities in school-age educare [VR 2021-00520]; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8748-8843

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